Rumours Of New Deus Ex 3 Art Greatly Exaggerated

By John Walker on August 6th, 2008 at 4:44 pm.

OLD!

A couple of gaming sites are posting this “new” Deus Ex artwork. Which, er, we first posted in April. Get ready – we’re going to be smug.

C&VG imply in some way that PC Zone ed Will Porter is involved, which is excellent as we know him well enough to mock him publically. (Max Console got pretty excited too, calling it the “first ever”, which is technically true).

I mean, we all make mistakes (for instance, at RPS, every day), but come on guys, the Deviant Art page with the picture states it was posted on 21st May! (Which makes our posting it in April all the more impressive, donchathink?)

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63 Comments »

  1. Bartek says:

    In the crap-art world of Deviant Art, there is always a few gems.

  2. SwiftRanger says:

    Well, it won’t be the last time sites put up such kind of ‘news’ a bit late.

    Btw, that other “third game in a series everyone should be fond of” Jagged Alliance 3 won’t be out before 2010 apparently and that was spotted in June this year already…

  3. machineisbored says:

    *are

  4. Kast says:

    Maybe it IS new concept art, and it’s a spot the different competition

  5. hungSolo says:

    I want Deus Ex 3 so bad, hopefully it’s not as bad as invisible war

    DX:IW wasn’t all bad. It’s been said elsewhere but bears repeating — where else was the series to go after the first game ticked off every concpiracy theory in the Big Book of Conspiracy Theories?

    The environments felt kind of limited, and the physics were floaty, but IW wasn’t the train wreck people make it out to be.

    Still, I’d like to see some improvement, too. Here’s hoping the prospect of a third installment inspires some, uh, inspired storytelling.

  6. WeakLemonDrink says:

    DX:IW wasn’t all bad.

    Well, I guess it’s easier to defend the game when you only address one thing that most people don’t even complain about anyway. I’m more concerned with the total stripping out of the skills/experience points system, the arse sandwich of a HUD and inventory, grossly simplified ‘biomods’, universal fucking ammo and the removal of all that cool computer and keypad interaction.

    The storytelling is probably one of the best things about the game, but that hardly matters when precisely every single thing that made Deus Ex truly special and involving is ripped out and dumped in the nearest river.

  7. Janto says:

    Yes, IW wasn’t really that bad, in hindsight, although I found it far less charming than its bigger daddy despite its spruced up looks, and gave up 2/3rds of the way through.

    Hell’s Kitchen in Deus Ex 1 may have been a fairly generic urban dystopia-tron, but it was fun to explore in a way none of IW’s areas were. Thief 3 just about scrapped by on tiny zones not being an issue because most of your actions were contained in a limited area, IW had you constantly running up and down that damn arcology, and the way load times were presented made them an issue. Morrowind’s house entering load? Didn’t care. Half Life 2′s loading new area while jumping a ramp in a swamp boat? Didn’t care. IW’s loads though were self-harm inducing for some reason, and I challenge the fine (and not so fine) denizens of this site to come up with a better system of handling quests in a DX:IW style game.

  8. Diogo Ribeiro says:

    Invisible War’s stripping of skills and experience wasn’t entirely without merit. I can relate to both sides of the camp, really. I enjoy seeing my character evolve and have my past choices dictate how it all plays out; but when the player and the character are so interwoven that there is little distinction between both, certain gameplay inconsistencies – like circumventing a character’s lack of skill with my own reflexes or ingenuity at manipulating or exploiting the game world and its entities – puts a damper on the meaning of character. As such, do I really need to bother with a character system that influences how it handles weapons when a player can nevermind that and go trigger happy in close quarters or just nudge the mouse in the opposite direction of the aiming reticule to negate heavy weapon recoil?

    Of course, I’d prefer if they had considered a more well thought out system instead of ripping it away, but still, I think that aspect was for the better. Without being a trainwreck, however, it felt deeply uninspired on all else.

  9. Lake says:

    Smug Level Yellow!

  10. WeakLemonDrink says:

    Sure, the Deus Ex skills system did need a little work, but I really think it did a great job of communicating the differing stages of skill in the various areas. Important stuff like Rifle, Pistol, Destruction, Swimming, Security… the system works brilliantly when you’re picking your advancement in those skills, as they all weave nicely into the choices the game forces you to make. What DX’s skill system is, is a demonstration the careful, multi-layered way levels and paths are mapped out. It feels like IW didn’t need these skills because the level design was so much more claustrophobic and linear. Fine for an FPS game, but not for a Deus Ex game.

    Plus, I would argue that your ‘circumventing lack of skill’ is a massive part of Deus Ex’s appeal. It improves you as a player and makes the world and situations far more interesting. And that’s even before we get on to the joys of full advancement in a certain area and the satisfaction that brings.

  11. WeakLemonDrink says:

    IW’s loads though were self-harm inducing for some reason

    I think in IW it’s a mixture of the horrifically small levels, the fact that they’re all separated by doors or lifts and those bloody loading screen that yank you out of the game.

    DX, Half-Life, Morrowind… they all give you a nice little on screen message as you pass into another map, but Oblivion and IW (two games I’m playing through again at the moment, which is why they’re on my mind) us loading screens. It’s an awful practice.

  12. Tim James says:

    That screenshot has too many bright colors, not enough precipitation, and I think I see a rainbow.

  13. Diogo Ribeiro says:

    Plus, I would argue that your ‘circumventing lack of skill’ is a massive part of Deus Ex’s appeal. It improves you as a player and makes the world and situations far more interesting.

    I’m not talking about the player deciding how the character should progress. Player progression and character progression are two very different things, although they certainly go together in several instances. What I’m talking about is being able to put the character system aside in favor of my own skill. There’s not much of a point in beefing up hacking skills when passwords, for instance, are not randomized, or investing in environmental training when there’s a large amount of breathers, hazmat suits and secondary paths to avoid obstacles.

    Of course, the above example may only be valid on replays as the player will use background knowledge, but other things – such as weapon usage – suffer from the same. To me, it’s not appealing to invest in rifles when I can handle them just as well without dumping points in them, because me – as the player – found a way to get past the character’s limitations.

  14. Charlie says:

    I don’t think CVG implied Will told them to put it up there but anyway haha! Poor old Will! I always like his articles.

  15. WeakLemonDrink says:

    I’m not talking about the player deciding how the character should progress.

    Good, because neither was I. Not in what you quoted me, anyway. I’m talking about this…

    What I’m talking about is being able to put the character system aside in favor of my own skill.

    …actually being a positive trait of the game. However, my argument is going on the assumption that no matter how good a player’s own skill is, they can never truly reach the heights of Master or even Advanced training in what they’re using. For example, I love the challenger of getting a headshot with my wild, flailing sniper rifle, but there’s no fucking way I could be as reliable as I would be with some training levels. However, this…

    o me, it’s not appealing to invest in rifles when I can handle them just as well without dumping points in them

    … suggests you actually can. Which I find massively unlikely. Can you really handle a rifle on Untrained as well as you could on Master (to pick the extreme example)? Especially Cos, if you can, then… well, that’s your fault for being a clever dick ;)

    I get what you’re saying, though. It’s not a perfect system, but I think it’s actually pretty damn great, none-the-less. I think the biggest issue is the over abundance of useful kit lying around that can make some skills redundant and make the game too easy, rather than the skills system itself. But that’s a whole different matter.

  16. WeakLemonDrink says:

    On the subject of DX3, though, I reckon we’ll be getting a better game than IW. A new development team should have the ability to look at the previous games objectively and have a good stab at getting a good mix of the two. Personally, I’d want something identical to DX, but I realise that isn’t going to happen.

    At the very least, the horrendous (and it really is horrendous) level design issues with IW should be gone, as consoles are far better at dealing with big environments these days.

  17. Charlie says:

    Really? I think something identical to DX now would actually be pretty shite(well not shite but deffinetely not a classic). I mean it’s a great game, for an old game, but I think many games have improved on what it did and it would seem a bit dated now.

  18. Jaxtrasi says:

    Invisible War had exactly one insurmoutable flaw, which was the Deus Ex title. I’m pretty sure Kieron is going to want to stay well out of this, so I’ll fight his corner. IW is a really, really good game. It’s the most polished FPS/RPG ever made, and has one of the most involving stories in a computer game.

    What’s on trial here is the difference between 1 and 2, not the value of 2 in its own right. Criticise their design decisions all you like, and complain that they didn’t make more Deus Ex (though speaking as a Deus Ex modder, I know exactly why they didn’t), but don’t level accusations at IW that it really doesn’t deserve, such as it being a geuinely bad game.

    DX, by the way, is in my PCG top ten, and IW isn’t. I know very well what’s good about DX, and I would loved to have had more of it, but instead I got a completely different game that I also enjoyed. Looks like the people who renamed Project: Snowblind knew what they were doing.

  19. WeakLemonDrink says:

    Really? I think something identical to DX now would actually be pretty shite

    Well, obviously when I say “identical”, I mean more of a modern re-imagining. Bring some complexity back into the augmentations, get a nice Skills system in place that draws on what DX did but refined and bring back that level of interactivity with machines. It might seem like a chore for some, but I *love* working out which keycodes or account details are correct and typing them into terminals. Cod all this ‘streamlining’ bollocks that the move to consoles seems to have brought on.

  20. Charlie says:

    Yeah it’s a bit like Fallout 3. Looks great but different from the first 2 so people will hate it just because it’s different from their own idea of how Fallout should be.

    I really enjoyed DX1 but have to say I played it a couple of years after it came out and I think it’s a bit overhyped tbh. Never got round to playing Invisible War but after reading that Jaxtrasi I really wish I had!

    @WeakLemon – I completely agree. For example Bioshock was a great game but felt like it had been a bit watered down, pun unintended. Can’t help but think that was for the 360 players. That makes me sound like a PC fanboy but I do own a 360, it’s great at certain games but I feel like it is killing RPG’s and ‘serious’ shooters

  21. Diogo Ribeiro says:

    My bad on that quote, then. Apologies.

    Note, I immensely enjoy Deus Ex’s character system. While not being particularly complex, it’s satisfying and well layed out.

    In terms of difficulty, different playstyles emerge or are born of necessity, of course. On higher difficulty settings it is tricky, and certainly requires a modicum of character advancement to avoid nearly being instagibbed :) But comparatively – and note, I am giving examples based on personal experience and your mileage may vary – the higher difficulty settings only require that I invest more than I usually do in the lower ones, but not necessarily attain the rank of Master in any skill level. Since my time with Deus Ex was a gradual process – experimenting multiple ways of character and level advancement, tackling the difficulty levels one by one – I was so versed in the motions necessary to keep going that sometimes, character skill seemed rather incidental to my progress and while I was (and am) far from being a circle-strafing shooting god, what little skill (this might be easier referenced to as “reflexes” since I’m addressing combat) I had, coupled with some lateral thinking, was enough to stay alive. I remember one game session on the highest difficulty tear (which the name illudes me now – Difficult? Realistic?) where I only invested about two or three points in my favoured weapon skills, and it was enough to tackle the likes of MJ12 Commandos.

    In the end, it’s a wonderful game, and Invisible War could have used a revamped approach instead of sweeping it under the rug. Although as I’ve said, I understand why removing it – giving players the chance of not being barred by character skills, which they could go around anyway – seemed like something worth pursuing.

  22. Geoff says:

    Diogo,

    To some extent, the circumventions you mention are just realism – someone who’s a poor marksman still can hit targets by running up closer to them, but this obviously carries some risk. Perhaps being able to hit a fly with a pistol from a mile away, while cool, is overrated and not a top priority for real life combat.

    But I understand what you’re getting at – it’s fundamentally hard to mesh numerical skill progression with real-time action. Other games are still trying, and it’s getting better, but still awkward. Oblivion handles some parts of it well – higher Marskman skill grants you bonuses like “no longer get fatigued holding bow string, or zoom, or knockdown, rather than accuracy +X%. Other parts not so well – Security is a perfect example where player skill can completely override a low stat when playing the minigame.

    Bioshock tried as well – increased “hacker skills” change the parameters in the minigame to make it harder or easier, and without sufficient skill, some of the games are actually impossible. But again, player skill can override character stats.

    It seems to me that some element of that will always be present when dealing with real time play elements…

  23. WeakLemonDrink says:

    IW is a really, really good game. It’s the most polished FPS/RPG ever made, and has one of the most involving stories in a computer game.

    Whoah, nelly! Are you sure you’re not going too far the other way? I totally take your point about the name being its biggest curse, but even when you disregard that you’re still left with some severely gameplay crippling level design issues (I’ve banged on about them enough) and an ‘open ended’ structure, that really isn’t open ended at all.

    I’m really not saying the game’s completely shit – it’s perfectly enjoyable but “he most polished FPS/RPG ever made”? and “one of the most involving stories in a computer game”? Christ…

    I also don’t think highlighting a game’s weaknesses by comparing it to the original’s strengths is a wholly unreasonable position to take, either, yet that seems to be the one thing thrown back in complainer’s faces, as if it’s some crippling flaw in their arguments. Which it isn’t.

  24. Jaxtrasi says:

    Charlie:

    It’s still very playable now. The character models are a little ugly, but that was true at release.

  25. WeakLemonDrink says:

    Oh, crap, I’ve totally ballsed up my last post and I can’t edit it for some reason. Needless to say, everything past the first paragraph is me, rather than a quote.

  26. Charlie says:

    Yeah, my biggest issue with Deus Ex was that I could hit the target but my character who was a bionically enhanced secret agent type couldn’t so I would miss because of some silly stat somewhere.

    Something must be done about these RPG’s which make things artificially difficult to do something because of your stats. I think it’s lazy!

  27. WeakLemonDrink says:

    I think it’s lazy!

    And, of course, removing stats completely and having the player character brilliant at everything isn’t.

  28. Charlie says:

    I don’t mean to remove player stats. But having the game make you miss a shot is frustrating and really puts me off. If I don’t really have a choice as to where the bullet goes don’t give me a crosshair!

    It’s ok for things that are out of the player’s hands but don’t pretend to give the player direct control over something which he doesn’t.

  29. WeakLemonDrink says:

    I don’t mean to remove player stats.

    Yeah, sorry, I was being needlessly flippant there.

    But having the game make you miss a shot is frustrating and really puts me off. If I don’t really have a choice as to where the bullet goes don’t give me a crosshair!

    Well, you could have a good stab at it. I think a point you’re missing is that JC is fresh out of the academy. In fact, isn’t he pulled out really prematurely because of the developing problem with Paul and the NSF? It feels right to me, that JC is a little wet behind the ears to start with.

  30. Jaxtrasi says:

    WeakLemonDrink:

    There are only three games in the genre. Deus Ex is generally acknowledged as being far, far more than the sum of its parts. Almost every element of it, analysed in isolation, is at best passable and at worst an absolute disaster. The writing. The story. The characters. The level design. The weapons. The combat. The skills system. None of these are praiseworthy in isolation. The combined effect is one of the finest games ever made, but it’s in no way whatsoever “polished”. Deus Ex is like a raggedy old book you found in a musty attic.

    Vampire Bloodlines, whilst brilliant, is also a shoddy, buggy, unfinished, crippled mess. Also not polished.

    That leaves IW. When I say polished, I don’t mean perfect, I mean they’ve taken on a smaller job and done it more carefully. IW sacrifices the breadth of DX for polish. Compare the Underworld Bar with the Greasel Pit. The Underworld Bar is more ambitious. The Greasel Pit is more polished. That really describes the differences between the two games.

    Also, it has a solid story. Analysed purely on its content (ignoring the magical, unaccountable presentation that makes Deus Ex work so well), it’s a better story. Amongst computer games, it stands out pretty well as one of the better ones.

    I’m not saying your argument is cripplingly flawed. I’m saying it’s just the wrong argument. “Deus Ex 2 is bad” isn’t a good argument to make. It’s not bad. It’s just not Deus Ex. “Deus Ex 2 isn’t enough like Deus Ex for me to enjoy it” is a flawless and perfectly reasonable argument to make. “I hope Deus Ex 3 is more like 1 than 2″ is a perfectly reasonable opinion to hold. I do too. I don’t think it will be.

  31. Diogo Ribeiro says:

    I think player skill and character competency are hard to conciliate, but nonetheless, the resulting quirks seem fine for many gamers. And sometimes, a broken thing may hold wonders that a more polished one does not (yes, I am making an analogy between Deus Ex and it’s sequel ;) ).

    One thing I found ironic though, was when upon Vampire: Bloodline’s release, many reviewers saw fit to point out the combat system had its faults – but these faults were exactly the same as those of Deus Ex, which they largely glossed over upon that game’s release :)

  32. Charlie says:

    I think we wait.

    Completely off topic. Has anyone clicked on the download Doom3 Free Fast Legal thingy? Seems pretty dodge to me.

  33. Jaxtrasi says:

    “And sometimes, a broken thing may hold wonders that a polish one does not”

    Absolutely. The two are a tradeoff. Personally, I’m glad we have one of each.

    “One thing I found ironic though, was when upon Vampire: Bloodline’s release, many reviewers saw fit to point out the combat system had its faults – but these faults were exactly the same as those of Deus Ex, which they largely glossed over upon that game’s release”

    Vampire has long, mandatory sections of extremely difficult and very tedious combat. Deus Ex has none.

  34. hungSolo says:

    This is what happens when I leave my computer for a couple of hours.

    At this point, I can’t add much to the conversation about the skills system and mods except to say that I, too, found them far less satisfying in IW. Between that and the frequent loads, the game is the poster child for what went wrong with cross-platform development in the early oughts. I’ve never played it on XBox, but that feels more like its natural home.

    To me, that doesn’t mean IW in sum isn’t a satisfying game to play. It’s just … lesser. I’d be content if the third one ends up somewhere in between.

  35. WeakLemonDrink says:

    Compare the Underworld Bar with the Greasel Pit. The Underworld Bar is more ambitious. The Greasel Pit is more polished. That really describes the differences between the two games.

    Ok, I’ll agree with this, but your argument stills leads to the same conclusion as my original one: DX is brilliant, IW isn’t.

    it’s a better story.

    If it *is* better (and I’m not sure it is) then it’s largely down to the brilliant world building that DX did. I do agree the story is good, though.

    ’m saying it’s just the wrong argument. “Deus Ex 2 is bad” isn’t a good argument to make. It’s not bad.

    I say this with the greatest respect, but I’ve never said it was a bad game, for fuck’s sake. The entire thrust of my argument was that it was poor, based on the strong points of the original game. I never claimed to say anything but. One more time: I agree that it is a good game, just obviously not as good as you think it is. Further up the thread I listed two things I thought was really bad about the game (Deus Ex or no Deus Ex) but I think the rest does stand up quite well.

    “Deus Ex 2 isn’t enough like Deus Ex for me to enjoy it” is a flawless and perfectly reasonable argument to make.

    Yes, and if I’ve failed to get across that this has been my entire point all along, then I apologise. But… it’s been my entire point all along.

  36. WeakLemonDrink says:

    Ah, my last comment is in a moderation queue. I guess my gabbing frequency is worryingly SPAM like. In fact, this comment will be probably be held, too… ah well.

    I think that wraps up my thoughts on the matter, anyway. Any more and I’ll start (continue?) going round in circles :)

  37. Diogo Ribeiro says:

    @Jaxtrasi:

    I can see how under that perspective, most reviewers could become more aware of the combat model’s deficiencies, yes.

  38. Jaxtrasi says:

    “I say this with the greatest respect, but I’ve never said it was a bad game, for fuck’s sake.”

    With an equal amount of respect, I never specifically directed my comments at you. Many people who read RPS maintain that IW is a bad game, and have posted in many previous threads. At least one of them (ghat) posted in this thread. If you’re not saying it’s a bad game, then my saying “People shouldn’t say it’s a bad game” clearly doesn’t apply to you.

  39. WeakLemonDrink says:

    then my saying “People shouldn’t say it’s a bad game” clearly doesn’t apply to you.

    Well, how about the bit I actually quoted, rather than something I, you know… didn’t?:

    “I’m not saying your argument is cripplingly flawed. I’m saying it’s just the wrong argument. “Deus Ex 2 is bad” isn’t a good argument to make.”

    That was aimed at me, wasn’t it?

  40. Janto says:

    Surely Mass Effect is the most polished RPG/Shooter out there? Admittedly not FPS, but it’s a point where the similarity (player skill vs character skill being a factor in aiming, etc) outweigh the difference in perspective in my opinion.

    Deus Ex 3 with Mass Effect’s production values would be a great and splendid thing, probably worthy of its own cargo cult, or at least more so than members of the British Royal Family.

    In typical internet soapbox mode, what I’d like to see would be a system with improving skills, but where the focus was on starting with a competent character who learns how to use more compex machines and tools, or unlocks additional capacities, rather than or in addition to incrementally increasing abilities. Say Swimming, at swimming rank one you can swim on the surface at a decent rate, but you’re crap at holding your breath. Rank 2 is diving, you take less damage from falling in water and are much better at diving, and can use scuba gear. Rank 3 is River Ninja, you get a stealth bonus in water and can move silently through it, and you can use advanced gadgets such as propulsion units. Examples are off the top of my head and rough, but the key thing is you’re not grinding through the 30′s to get to the 40′s and a 10% improvement boost. Instead, each advance gives the player something new and useful for the rest of the game.

    Anyone want to make an RPG? ;)

  41. Diogo Ribeiro says:

    I’ve been trying to make an RPG for ten years now. I doubt it would be any easier on my part if I tried to tackle something with the legacy of Deus Ex.

    I think I’ll start small and do some Metroidvania with GameMaker, which is about the only thing someone as ignorant of coding as me could ever aspire to.

    Could Rank 4 be Underwater Squidlord? You could take Cthulhu out for a drink :)

  42. Larington says:

    The simple truth is, that if DX-IW had been released under any other title, no one would’ve made such a big deal about DX-IWs apparent failings, thing is, it was a different game made for a different audience.

    This led to the people who liked DX-IW appreciating how streamlined it is. Meanwhile, the folks who prefered the original (I myself being amonst them), were unable to appreciate how simplified the game was.
    Odd how the change of one word changes the meaning quite so much.

    In any case, theres very little info out there on the game, btw, the DX3 forums has a thread where a chap visited their offices, but there wasn’t any info of note from that, just some pictures of some folks and places. Until I hear more solid info, I’m on standby.

  43. James T says:

    But having the game make you miss a shot is frustrating and really puts me off. If I don’t really have a choice as to where the bullet goes don’t give me a crosshair!

    I really don’t think this is any worse than the widening crosshair during running in, say, CoD4. You still know the spread of your shot, there’s just a little more of it since, talk of superpowers aside, JC is the new guy, still learning to apply his training to the field. With increased skills, there’s less scatter and the crosshair comes in tighter, accordingly; seems fair enough to me.
    I think if you improved combat AI and the stealth mechanics, either chuck out or make useful some of the redundant items (cigarettes, mini plasma gun etc), and polish up the veneer to the standard of the day, DX would not only ‘stand up’ today, but continue to outshine practically everything else.

  44. luminosity says:

    I wish I could get DX:IW from Steam to run so I could participate in angry arguments about its merits. :(

  45. Charlie says:

    It seems to me when you shoot a gun in a 1st person RPG it feels more like you click and the game rolls a dice to calculate whether you hit or not, ala D&D.

    The first shot, which should be a headshot, doesn’t hit because my character had to roll a 15 instead of a 6 beccause of the stats of my character. Why not just have us click on the enemy if our aiming has no effect?

    I agree with Janto, maybe it would be better if you just learned to use more effective weapons and new abilities?

  46. sbs says:

    It still feels weird for me to compare Bloodlines with Deus Ex. While it’s a game that’s has so many different priorities, I feel massively reminded of Deus Ex playing it. It’s kind of a similarly deep level of interaction with the world it put’s you in, while having an enormously different approach at reaching this level. It is almost irritating at times, but in a good way. And by the way, thank god for fanpatches, the latest one not older then a month. Impressive fanbase.

    And yes, IW does what it does very well and is a good game in it’s own right, but not as a successor to the first title.
    See, It was developed for the home console players, too, and they can not grasp all those complicated statistics and options. For all we know Deus Ex 3 could even have these interactive cutscenes and shit that seems to be so popular right now – “Quick time events” or whatever they call them
    :>

  47. Muzman says:

    Interesting to encounter DX fans who thought IW was fairly well written or had a good story. Most DX ers I bump into hate IW top to bottom.
    Had a few humdinger debates on the endings too. The Anti-IW camp did have a point in that the original game’s endings are more open ended thanks to not leaping into the future to show you what happened. But it was argued that DXs endings are more equal to choose from too. Me, I thought it was plainly obvious which one was the “right” choice in both games. Perhaps I’m playing the “What sort of sci-fi story is this?” game rather than the game-game, if you know what I mean.
    (Maybe I just sent everything into spoiler country)

  48. Captain Jorge says:

    There are too many problems with IW to count. But the top one is this:

    Alex Denton is a pussy.

  49. Gap Gen says:

    I suspect that one of my main problems with IW was that it wasn’t long enough. The character development, in my opinion, was a shallow husk of its predecessor, and there was no consequence for the more important actions (like killing your partner) or indeed which side you chose (oh no! your death commandos have fallen asleep when I hit them with a stick!)

    Then again, I think the only way it could have won was by not being a sequel and doing a different story entirely.

  50. Gap Gen says:

    Oh, and the highlight of IW for me was watching a group of civilians succeed in setting themselves on fire as I walked past.