Spore War

By Alec Meer on September 9th, 2008 at 9:27 am.

People really don’t like DRM. And a small but very passionate/ferocious group of people really, really, really don’t like DRM. They’ve struck back by shaping Amazon’s user reviews of Spore en masse, bringing its average rating down to just one star.

While I’m aware it’s a major issue for a lot of gamers, I think it’s a hateful thing to do on this kind of scale. I do understand their concerns entirely, and would much prefer there was no DRM in Spore. Fine, don’t buy the game yourself or crack it if you’re not happy with the restrictions and privacy violations. Write to EA or trading standards, blog about it, demand there’s a big warning sticker on the box.

Even protest ratings based on your actual negative experiences of the DRM are entirely valid, but this concerted group effort (most of whom, I imagine, haven’t actually played the game or experienced its usage restrictions first-hand) is giving innocent Amazon customers entirely the wrong impression of a game they might well love: that star rating is all that a lot of people look at. This isn’t raising awareness of DRM: it’s just making people not buy the game because they think it must be rubbish.

The DRM’s a significant problem – a problem we won’t know the full extent of for a while, I’d imagine – but my concern is that one of the most influential buying guides on the web is currently only telling one side of the story. A progressive, excellent game could get sunk because of it, and we’ll end up with more licensed tripe instead. Not that likely, granted, but possible.

Appreciate that this is a subject people feel very strongly about, but please express your comments below without bellowing abuse at each other.

, .

350 Comments »

  1. Nallen says:

    @Sana
    /me counts number of systems I’ve installed Q3A on over the years

    No. No it isn’t.

  2. Erlam says:

    “… this concerted group effort (most of whom, I imagine, haven’t actually played the game or experienced its usage restrictions first-hand) is giving innocent Amazon customers entirely the wrong impression of a game they might well love: that star rating is all that a lot of people look at.”

    Then they deserve to ‘fall’ for this. Anyone who makes little to no effort to look at what they’re purchasing have no right to complain. Are you actually saying that people who go to Amazon.com, see the one star, and then avoid the game, are somehow wronged? Maybe if they woke up and looked at what was going on this wouldn’t be a problem.

    If a game has this kind of moronic ‘security’ measure, it deserves this kind of attention. What other message could you possibly send to EA that would have an effect this? EA is about money (and I don’t blame them for that, but they also don’t really care about customer reaction, unless it affects sales), so they only message you can send them that they’ll understand is one that makes them lose money.

    For those about to one-star, we salute you.

  3. cuk says:

    The review is not only about gameplay, its how much you get for the money you pay.
    And SecureRom can really screw you over. EA should realise this is not a good anti pirate protection because in the end you will have much less problems if you just download the pirate version (which is out before you can buy the game in stores :P) than actually buying the game.

    Also the game is really not any good. It feels like its made for kids under 10 years. Simplyfied to the max. Its like that with most new games :(

  4. gradius says:

    1) It’s awesome that consumers actually have some organised power for a change. That’s more important than the fate of Spore, all of EA, and probably all of gaming.

    2) Amazon just needs to make a more granular rating system. Spore (presumably, haven’t played it) deserves 5 stars for Gameplay, 3 stars for Graphics and 0 stars for Other.

  5. JonFitt says:

    @Diogo Ribeiro:
    No, that’s incorrect I didn’t say they couldn’t enter. You’re free to enter the pub on accepting the conditions.

    But more likely these reviews are from people who haven’t even been in on the grounds that the entrance is too barbaric. That is a review I would accept.

  6. Robin says:

    I think it’s a pretty valid way to raise awareness of the issue, considering that the specialist press (especially in the US) seem to be terrified of upsetting the big publishers. It’s the lack of any legitimately aired dissent that has allowed EA to get away with the DRM schemes used on Spore and Mass Effect in the first place.

    I would object to a review site or magazine docking points for DRM (because inevitably changes to the distribution method would eventually make the criticisms invalid), but Amazon reviews aren’t supposed to be expert appraisals of the game, but aggregated opinion of likely customer satisfaction. The typical audience for Spore (casual gamers or whatever term you want to use – families with multiple machines) are the least likely to know that they can circumvent the DRM, and are the most likely to have their experience adversely affected by it.

    It’s not going to significantly affect the game’s sales (which is why I have to respectfully disagree with Cliffski on this one, sorry), but it will generate bad press.

    It’s worth bearing in mind that EA are no longer where they were five years ago – the company that dwarfed their competitors and had a tight grip on all the important markets. The market has changed and EA are struggling to stay relevant, and things like Spore’s DRM are products of desperation rather than strategy. I don’t think you could get someone from EA (least of all Will Wright) to sit down and explain why limiting the number of installs has any beneficial effect. Valve, Take2 and Activision/Blizzard don’t do it, and by golly if they’re not all making money on PC games hand over fist.

    If the net effect for them is negative (as we saw with Starforce) they might back down.

    @The Poisoned Sponge: “What it is is to stop you reselling the game in used game stores.”

    Extremely few retailers take second hand PC games.

    @Rob Lang: “wish I could phone up Toyota and get them to switch my car back on when it breaks (or, rather, I drive it into something) – oh, hang on, I can.”

    What a horrible analogy. You don’t have to phone up Toyota for permission to use your car as intended.

    @Diogo Ribeiro:

    “If between one to three years, you believe you may not have finished it, I’d suggest that it is not a problem with the game or its DRM.”

    Is the idea of people wanting to enjoy a game in perpetuity such an alien concept these days? I blame MTV.

  7. cuk says:

    @gradius
    No it doesn’t deserve 5 star for gameplay. I would say 2-3.

  8. Erlam says:

    “I can’t boot up Deus Ex or Planescape: Torment in Vista even with compatability modes, and can’t play some classics I adored on WinXP.”

    Really? Deus Ex? I play it every week or so – I have XP Pro. I’m using my old, first week release, CD too. Well, I had to fix the scratches on it, but it does work. What error are you getting?

  9. Diogo Ribeiro says:

    @Colthor:

    Planescape: Torment works fine on Vista, as does Baldur’s Gate.
    I haven’t tried Deus Ex, but it does work fine on XP x64. It may have required the CD-check disabling, I forget.

    Then you’re luckier than me, mate.

    Frankly your argument that playing old games might be tricky in the future, so therefore copy protection that renders them uninstallable is absolutely fine is… unfathomable.

    Come on, man, I didn’t say it was absolutely fine :) I was simply questioning the reasoning of people placing on DRM the blame for something – in this case, inability to play the game in the future – that may happen if DRM wasn’t there. From a technical perspective, it can muck things up just as any other technical obstacle. The issue is not that it’s fine, is that people start to act defensive in a way as if DRM was the only thing that could stop them dead in their tracks if they wanted to replay it.

    And the argument that people shouldn’t complain because some people wait until they can play a game before buying it… What? I think you’re misunderstanding something there.

    Again, it’s not about telling them shouldn’t complain, and more in line with the previous answer. From an end user perspective, there are so many variables when it comes to installing, playing and dealing with the maintenance of videogames, that people seem to place all of their frustration on DRM. DRM is a stupid, pointless thing, to be sure; but can you tell me with a straight face that when it comes to stability and compatibility, DRM is the worst of our worries?

  10. Diogo Ribeiro says:

    @Erlam:

    That may have become muddled, so a correction is in order – I can boot it up in XP, not on Vista :)

  11. Cope says:

    @sana, it’s 3 installs. They used the 3 computers thing as an example, to ‘dumb it down’ so non-technophiles can understand. Like the Windows DRM, if you upgrade the motherboard or hard drive you’ll use up another install. If you just reinstall your copy of Windows you won’t use up a Spore install, but if you re-format your drive and reinstall Windows, you will. If you uninstall Spore you’re not credited with another install. A call to EA to request another install will take anywhere between 6 minutes and an hour, depending on how competent the guy on the other end is and whether you ask the right questions. The call isn’t free. You get 1 more install per phone call.

    I found all this with some google searches, you can verify the information yourself if you want. It’s so ridiculous that I couldn’t believe it either…

  12. Diogo Ribeiro says:

    @Robin:

    Is the idea of people wanting to enjoy a game in perpetuity such an alien concept these days?

    No. But the idea that we will be able to do so without a hitch might be.

  13. Shadowmancer says:

    @ Diogo Ribeiro really? deus ex works fine on vista 32 and 64 for me
    Diogo Ribeiro says:

    @Robin:

    Is the idea of people wanting to enjoy a game in perpetuity such an alien concept these days?

    No. But the idea that we will be able to do so without a hitch might be.

    agreed 10char

  14. JonFitt says:

    I want to play it – 1 install
    I’m going to install Vista at some point in the near-ish fututre – 2 installs
    My wife wants to play it – 3 installs
    She is due a new laptop shortly – 4 installs.

    and that’s just for starters.

    People are saying 10 years from now, but what about 2 years from now? After the up-teen expansion packs that are due out. I’ve lost track of the number of times my wife re-installed The Sims.
    Are you going to have any installs left for “Spore: Vacation”?

    Someone also mentioned here that you’re only allowed one account as well, so how are my wife and I supposed to play without having to use each other’s spawn?

    We don’t have to play at the same time, but we do want to both play one copy.

  15. cuk says:

    @Diogo Riberio
    offtopic:
    Two months ago I finished Planescape Torment on Vista. Before that I played Deus Ex (tried the HR unofficial update). Zero problems, installed from my original CDs and I don’t even think I updated it :P

    edit: x64

  16. Mr Lunch says:

    It just goes to show that it’s mostly the clueless that pay for software. Poor, invested ranters. No-one with any nous could possibly have a problem, even if they stoop as far as handing over life-tokens for the thing. Who cares how bad the system gets if you can exist outside of it? Hell, it keeps the fuckheads contained and occupied imo… moar DRM!!

  17. Diogo Ribeiro says:

    @Shadout:

    Agree, to a point; there’s certainly a few things that can’t be done, but other methods of compatibility sometimes fail because of a desire of propelling technology forward without accounting for those that may predominantly use something older but more widespread. But both inevitably bring about the conscious knowledge that, sooner or later, it might just stop working.

    And certainly, if DRM is to be used, it will need to be extensively tweaked and improved before it meets publishers demands without screwing up with gamers.

  18. Diogo Ribeiro says:

    @cuk:

    Thanks for telling me :) I don’t think I have the x64 version of Vista, though. Might be related? I’ll have to check this out when my gaming PC gets fixed.

  19. Colthor says:

    @Diogo Ribeiro:
    The worst? Maybe not, but this is certainly trying harder. It is the one area that people are actively trying to make more of a hindrance, rather than less, and it is deliberately imposed rather than being accidental or out of the developer’s control, like future hardware or OS troubles.

  20. Alex says:

    Who decides whether to buy something or not by just looking at a star rating?

    Surely that would just mean two slightly different flavours of stupid meeting eachother in the middle.

  21. Dinger says:

    @Robin: if reviewers are going to factor price into their silly little point scores, they better factor DRM as well. It’s hard to dispute that DRM makes the product less valuable to the user, just as a $100 price tag makes the user expect more.

    By the way, the estimate for Spore to break even is 1.6 million sales. But the whole investment, with all the other Spore titles, and the secondary markets (a Spore comic book generator!) make EA’s break-even vs. wildly profitable line hard to call. But odds are good it’ll get there. This is the biggest game complex of the year.

  22. cullnean says:

    any one got a link to the eula any where?

  23. Diogo Ribeiro says:

    @Ragnar:

    If it works now, it will work in 10 years with the same hardware/software setup.

    But by your own admission, your hardware/software environment might change because of updates to memory, processor or hard drive. Sure, if you manage to keep the same hardware and software, the game will work in 10 years; but the way things are, it’s quite difficult to achieve this. These environments never stay the same for 10 years, unless you’re playing a console. There always changes, from drivers, to small lines of code, to whatnot.

    And it is highly probable that windows is sufficiently backwards-compatible to allow for playing older games (heck until I bought Vista 64-bit I were able to play 10-15 year old DOS games without a problem).

    WHY DO YOU PEOPLE TAUNT ME? :(

    I’ve had more problems with older games than outright success. But since I need to fix my gaming PC, I’ll thoroughly look into it as soon as I can. But I know of at least one other person with the same problem in Vista – no Deus Ex love.

    The point is that playing the game in a non-supported environment is my own headache, but if I want to play a game that I have bought, in a supported environment (to the point that it has already been tested to work in said environment), I see no reason why I should need to contact any support just to *be allowed* to play the game.

    You’ll note, I never I say agreed with this. Far from it. But for the most part, I think people were blowing things out of proportion somewhat. And my “quest”, so to speak, was to understand exactly why DRM demanded such outbursts and vitriol when it’s not, by far, the only thing that can stand in the way of replaying or reinstalling games.

  24. Delduwath says:

    @Diogo Ribeiro:
    The thing is, you can guarantee that you’ll be able to play a game in the future by keeping a machine from every “era”. For example, a Win98 machine with a 3dfx card, a WinXP machine with an Geforce4, and so on. Obviously, this requires significant physical storage space and financial commitment, but it only depends on what YOU do. If you take certain precautions, you’ll be able to play a 20-year-old game even if the current generation of computers has no concept of “CD-drive” or “motherboard”.

    Remotely-activated games like Spore and so on rely on SOMEONE ELSE, specifically EA and their SecuRom activation servers. There’s no way YOU can ensure that 20 years from now, EA will still be an entity, that their activation servers will be running, and that they will still be responding to queries from Spore.

    DRM and hardware/software changes both stand in the way of playing current games in the future. One of these obstacles is in your power to circumvent, one of them you cannot do a thing about. This is why no one is mentioning the hardware/software when talking about playing games in the future, and is focusing only on the DRM.

  25. Seniath says:

    It’s almost 5. Thank you all for keeping me entertained today whilst at work with your endless ranting!

  26. The Sombrero Kid says:

    emulation always guarantees computability in the long run without drm, but then combine emulation with stripped exes and you’ve still got the same guarantee, this isn’t about whether or not you will be able to play it in 10 years it’s about surrendering basic freedoms now AND in 10 years.

    no one would tolerate a government this intrusive and their interests are closer aligned with yours than EA’s ever will be.

  27. cliffski says:

    “@ cliffski so you would prefer drm running in the background of your desktop sucking your cpu dry”

    I’m pretty tech savvy,. I can look at CPU and memory load of all the processes currently running on my PC. securorom is doing nothing. zero zilch. It’s not a running process, and I can’t see it as a service either. The vista sidebar, MSN and my fancy mouse driver uses up memory and CPU, but not securom. By all means hate DRM, but not because of some FUD. It doesn’t use up anything when you aren’t running a securom game. Not that I can see anyway…

  28. cliffski says:

    “no one would tolerate a government this intrusive and their interests are closer aligned with yours than EA’s ever will be.”

    gimme a break. the USA has the patriot act, and the UK prevented us demonstrating within a mile radius of the hq of our parliamentary democracy. What did you do to protest these actions?
    anything?

  29. cHeal says:

    “This isn’t raising awareness of DRM: it’s just making people not buy the game because they think it must be rubbish. “

    I don’t think that is the point. They are trying to hit the sales.

    I’ve boycotted it, as I did Mass Effect and Bioshock and am prepared to simply miss out.

    I support the cause but I’m not sure about this kind of action. I am wondering how long it’ll take for it to be coined as some form of terrorism.

    I would like ask one thing though, Alec did you feel the same when gamers done this to that womans book from ages ago after she ranted about Mass Effects explicit sexual content?

    I don’t remember anyone condemning their actions then, and certainly there is far greater justification on this occasion since DRM is an issue with this product.

  30. Velt says:

    DRM and you.

    If you purchase a copy of and MMORPG, how many accounts are you permitted? One. The CD Key you were given can only be tied to one username and password.

    Why should it work any differently for any other game? You can’t load up WoW and log in twice, unless you own two separate copies of the game. Nobody has a problem with this, yet it’s a problem with Spore?

    DRM is just a method of ensuring that the artists who create content, are able to keep creating without fear that their work will be stolen from them.

    It’s an inconvenience, but due to the amount of software that has been stolen in the past, It’s a required evil at this point. If you have ever pirated software in your life, it’s your fault that DRM exists. We’re pretty much all guilty.

    If there is no DRM, there is no protection for the artists that create games, and in the end they are the ones punished when companies can’t afford to continue paying them for their services. I’m not saying that the method is flawless, but DRM is necessary. Otherwise 30% of the PC market is lost, which means they have more difficulties breaking even after the release of the game. Games aren’t cheap to make like the old days, it costs millions to make a video game. They spend insane amounts of money just for advertising alone. Why release a game for PC if you aren’t going to break even? or Profit? Welcome to Capitalism.

  31. The Sombrero Kid says:

    @cliffski
    it does when you are though which is perhaps more important (certainly to me) it easily doubles the start up time for mass effect (in my case more 3 – 5x since it loads instantly after securom does it’s jiggery and I get past the component Adds!)

    ohh and thats not intrusive

    @Velt
    it’s nothing to do with the creators, I’m a creator, it’s the people who distribute, id’ gladly strip all my software of drm and self distribute if it was possible

  32. Shadowmancer says:

    @ The Sombrero Kid “no one would tolerate a government this intrusive and their interests are closer aligned with yours than EA’s ever will be.”

    The governments far more intrusive than u think they recently alowed isps to become internet police and ban ppl for downloading too big files, e.g. one of my friends was banned from virgin media for downloading the orange box and the id super pack at the weekend, and he got them legally of steam.

  33. cliffski says:

    my PC is from when vista was new, and starts up spore, bioshock and company of heroes very quickly. If you want to be upset about game startup times, be upset at those silly, stupid adverts and movies, not the copy protection.
    Attack DRM for what it is, not what the zealots claim it is. It is not a tool of fascism or something that gives you cancer.
    Its a bad idea that doesn’t work, but its not ebola.

  34. Frosty840 says:

    Spore’s a pile of pretty graphics and intelligent, procedural animation-generation on top of a set of crap minigames.
    Even the Space section is a crap minigame, it’s just a big minigame.
    There’s no depth anywhere.

    There’s no choosing speed over strength in the creature creator.
    There’s no fashioning tools from stone and development of technologies in the tribal stage.
    There’s no tech tree at all in the civilization stage.
    There’s hardly any challenge in the space stage, and it’s just so indescribably dull anyway that what little challenge there is is soon becomes a monotonous chore.

    You can’t even reconfigure the controls for fuck’s sake! Who makes games where you can’t reconfigure the controls?

    Yes, the creature creator is very, very pretty, but Spore is hardly a game, and is barely even a toy.

    I keep hearing that Spore is original and innovative and all that bollocks.

    How?

    It’s a set of dull minigames, connected by a common theme. So are the Big Brother games. Sure, Spore is less broken than those, but so what? “Not broken and bugged all to fuck” is the game industry’s stand-in for original and innovative now?

    Heck, just look at the achievements-bandwagonning “badges” from the space stage. Every single solitary one of them is grind-based. All of ‘em! “Travel 500 times”. “Visit 100 star systems”. “Use the planet-sculpting tools 50 times”.

    Where the hell is the high-end stuff? The badge for digging up every tree on a planet and using them to spell out your name so that it can be seen from orbit? Where’s the ability to play as a race so violent and warlike that you don’t end up having to drag your sorry arse back to every backwoods world in your empire every six minutes to defend it from THREE FUCKING PIRATE SHIPS. Fuck’s sake, I had enough firepower to defend against that sort of force in the civilization stage, and the other empires can certainly muster enough force to see my spaceship off, so why do my colonies continually freak out at a “threat” that took me all of thirty seconds to deal with at the start of the space stage, let alone at the end of it.

    Aside from any of the complaints I have about the game itself, the parts of the game that are blatantly missing and will be available in the expansion pack are simply insulting.
    There’s an editor for nearly everything in the game, but no ability to edit turrets, no way to create plants, no way to create new city layouts, no scope to hilariously over-power your creature in the cell and creature stages.

    Selling me a game that’s not all that good is one thing, but selling me three quarters of a game that’s not all that good and making me wait six months or so on the promise that if I wait quietly like a good little boy they might eventually allow me to spend more money to get the finished version of the game which by that stage might actually be worth playing? That’s a different matter. That’s insulting.

    Okay, rant done. Gonna go play some CivIV. You know, a game that shipped complete and had expansions that added to its completeness by making it better?

  35. The Sombrero Kid says:

    virgin media != government and not leftting people download thing != invading thier home through software

    if the govenment shipped a product with this level of spyware there would be public outrage

    ohh and people would refuse to use it and spread the word about it on principle like they are now

  36. Ian says:

    Cliffski clearly doesn’t realise how many babies get stomped on as a direct result of DRM.

    Shame on you! Shaaaaaaaaaame!

  37. cliffski says:

    how is it spyware again? what personal information does it take from you? is it a keylogger? Directline know way more about me than EA will because securrom is on my PC.

    securrom is not a trojan, nor a rootkit, nor spyware. it is copy protection.

    Look, I don’t like DRM either, but lets try to get the facts straight surely?

  38. Noc says:

    Goddamnit, Cliffski! We are the internet! We do not deal in “facts.” What we deal with is much more important.

  39. liquidindian says:

    Worse than the DRM, I reckon, is the limit of one account per installation. So here you have a game aimed at everyone, veteran gamers, kids, wives, girlfriends, parents, everyone can have a go, even if it’s just to make houses and planes and silly monsters. Yet the surely trivial matter of having a few accounts for each installation – despite it saying so in the manual! – isn’t available. And I’d lay money (not much, but some) on this feature not being available because of piracy concerns.

    (Edit – Oh, er, this is already mentioned. Sorry)

  40. Boojum says:

    @Robin “Extremely few retailers take second hand PC games.”

    Obviously you’ve never been to GAME, Gamestation, Amazon or Ebay.

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/offer-listing/B0000DG2T3/ref=dp_olp_1/203-3750482-3032745

    Notice the section that says “used”, for example. I guess I could go out and take photos of the second hand games in Gamestation but I can’t be bothered

    Oh yeah. DRM.

    Don’t care. Not in the slightest. If it gives me problems, I’ll just crack the sonnovabitch.

    Wow, DRM really does lead to thoughts of piracy.

    Bad Boojum, Bad!

  41. Owen says:

    Jesus wept.

    I think the game is brilliant and I’m loving it. But rather sadly I appear to be in the minority, on this RPS anger-fest anyway.

    The creator tool is without a shadow of a doubt one of the most impressive things I’ve ever seen. Strong words I know but anything which enables someone to use their creative abilities and imagination to create creatures, buildings, planes, cars, tanks, ships and more is just ground breaking. More so when the tool is so incredibly easy to use.

    It’s a shame that to some (1200 odd it would seem) that is not what matters. You ARE missing out.

  42. grumpy says:

    Velt: Do you seriously believe that stuff?

    Let’s take a closer look:

    If you purchase a copy of and MMORPG, how many accounts are you permitted? One. The CD Key you were given can only be tied to one username and password.

    Why should it work any differently for any other game? You can’t load up WoW and log in twice, unless you own two separate copies of the game. Nobody has a problem with this, yet it’s a problem with Spore?

    Seriously? These are two entirely different systems. I can log in to WoW on *any* computer, no matter how many times the game has been reinstalled there, and no matter whose copy of the game has been installed. If someone has WoW, I can log in. If someone does not have WoW, I can install it just like that.
    With Spore… I can’t. If I try to install the game on a new computer, *bang*, I use up a precious installation slot.

    DRM is just a method of ensuring that the artists who create content, are able to keep creating without fear that their work will be stolen from them.

    No it isn’t. In an ideal world, that’s what it would be, but….. Spore was cracked on release. The pirates have been able to play the game from day 1. So ti does *not* protect anyone.

    It’s an inconvenience, but due to the amount of software that has been stolen in the past, It’s a required evil at this point.

    Is it? Then how come so many games sell very well *without* extreme DRM? Stardock don’t use *any* DRM. Sins of a Solar Empire has sold 500k copies so far.
    Steam is a huge success, and while that *is* DRM, it doesn’t limit how often I can install or download the game.
    Civ4 only required the CD to be in the drive during startup. It doesn’t care how many computers you install it on. And that game too, sold shedloads of copies.
    The facts contradict you.

    If there is no DRM, there is no protection for the artists that create games

    There is no protection for them WITH DRM either. That’s kinda the point. The game still got cracked on day 1.

    Otherwise 30% of the PC market is lost, which means they have more difficulties breaking even after the release of the game.

    That doesn’t matter, because the remaining 70% is worth 80 gajillion megadollars.
    See, I can make up numbers too.

    Why release a game for PC if you aren’t going to break even? or Profit? Welcome to Capitalism.

    Why buy a game that gives you less value for your money? Welcome to capitalism. The point about capitalism is that consumers buy what they want, and so corporations have to *give* them what they want in order to make money.
    Saying “We decide what you get to buy” is *not* capitalism, it’s fascism.

    And now tell me, how does EA make more money by doing something that makes a lot of people *cancel* their orders?

    Perhaps, just perhaps, it’s not as black and white as you like to pretend. Perhaps, the facts actually tell a different story. Simple, easily verified facts. Not random made-up numbers like “30%”, but actual fact.

    Any idiot can verify that Spore was cracked on day 1. And you only have to read a few posts in this thread to see that there are people who have chosen not to buy a game because of its DRM.

  43. Ian says:

    @Noc: You forgot to mention logic. That has no place here either.

  44. cullnean says:

    i saw DRM punch a baby

  45. someyoungguy says:

    publishers and developers that disrespect their audience in this manner deserve to have their game rated as low as possible. i’m only upset that one can’t assign zero stars.

    @grumpy
    thanks for taking the time to type up what the rest of us were only doing in our heads.

  46. JonFitt says:

    I saw DRM spoil a good game.

    It’s punishing customers (not pirates) because pirates exist. There is no logic there.

    I guess we’re arguing if it’s punishing them enough to be annoyed enough to protest on Amazon or if their not sufficiently punished?
    Perhaps no punishment would solve this?

  47. Jim says:

    Well, one thing I want to know that could make me look past any DRM issues:

    Can you make a species that looks like Kathy Ireland naked?

  48. Paul Moloney says:

    Part of me feels guilty at not being inconvenienced by DRM. I’ve honestly never had a problem with it, and never found I couldn’t install or play a game that has it, over the course 2 desktops and 2 laptops. I feel like someone in Paris 1968 who missed the whole revolution. Am I just incredibly lucky? Or is it possibly these “DRM stole my dog’s homework” people just, well, have crap machines?

    P.

  49. Diogo Ribeiro says:

    @Delduwath:

    True to an extent, but how do you define an era with computers as opposed to, say, consoles? What about OS updates, for instance – how many games had problems with WinXP’s Service Pack 3 or nVidia and Radeon drivers? How many game patches have all but disappeared after companies folded and could no longer sustain their servers?

    I’m not saying you’re wrong, but if anything, it’s slightly nebulous to achieve that level of certainty.

  50. Diogo Ribeiro says:

    @Jim:

    Probably not, but you can have Charles Darwin dance and lay eggs.