Bohemia: There’s Only One Real Flashpoint Sequel

By Kieron Gillen on February 27th, 2009 at 5:52 pm.

Assaulted peanut?
And it’s ArmA2. This is fascinating. The situation where a developer keeps the technology and the publisher gets the name is common enough. There’s always obvious competition between the keeper of the flame and the keeper of the name (e.g. Football Manager versus Championship Manager, Far Cry 2 versus Crysis, etc). But Bohemia, in a recent press-release, have made that incredibly explicit. To quote the opening: “Is the upcoming Codemasters game really ‘the much anticipated return of the genre-defining military conflict simulator’ Operation Flashpoint: Cold War Crisis? Is it really ‘the official sequel to the multi-award winning Operation Flashpoint: Cold War Crisis’? Bohemia Interactive says: ‘No! What matters is the game, not the name.’” Seeing Bohemia’s fury at Flashpoint 2 being described by Codemasters as the “return of” or “official sequel to” is without precedent in recent gaming history. Read the whole thing for more. Crikey.

We took the opportunity to chat to Bohemia CEO Marek Spanel about the whole situation…

RPS: While the name-goes-one-way-dev-goes-another happens, it’s a rare thing where we see a developer explicitly making a press release to state that? What made you decide it was time for open confrontation?

Marek Spanel: Quite likely, without knowing the full details of each situation, it’s almost certainly different in every case, as the nature of each publishing relationship is different. One recent example that may come to mind for many is with Crysis and Far Cry 2 – but even that comparison doesn’t fit as UbiSoft simply acquired the entire Far Cry IP, which completely avoided such an unfortunate situation. In our case, the name stayed with the publisher, but all of the other rights of the game have remained in our hands, so the technology, the story, the design and gameplay of the original Operation Flashpoint Cold War Crisis (and Resistance and Elite) are all 100% owned by Bohemia Interactive.

As to the confrontation and timing… well, recently Codemasters have started to promote their new Operation Flashpoint (2) Dragon Rising heavily in way that we believe misleadingly publicize their game as the “official sequel” to our Operation Flashpoint Cold War Crisis so we simply expressed our view on the entire situation.

RPS: Reading the press-release you seem surprised that Codemasters chose to develop a sequel to Flashpoint. Is this correct? Is it more that they’re doing it at all, or is it the deliberate claiming they are the “official” sequel. As in, if they’re being deliberately aggressive so you have to respond?

Marek Spanel: Codemasters own the rights to the name Operation Flashpoint, which we’re fully aware of and we’re not claiming anything different. We’re also not surprised that they are developing a new game under the name Operation Flashpoint. In fact, for us it is additional motivation to work harder and develop a better game. But what we protest are the marketing attempts to create a strong connection between the original Operation Flashpoint Cold War Crisis and this new game of theirs, when there is no connection other than the name and similarities in the overall concept. We insist that all credit and recognition received by Operation Flashpoint Cold War Crisis really belongs to the game and not the name, thus we feel it’s inappropriate for such a legacy to be attached or implied to new unrelated game under circumstances of this particular situation, especially when it seems that Codemasters are not giving Bohemia Interactive credit it rightfully deserves.

One old Czech proverb says “a lie repeated a hundred times becomes the truth” and there is some point in it that could be applied to the gaming industry and media these days. Maybe from Codemasters it was just a series of unfortunate misunderstandings, but something is seriously wrong when in a preview on a major gaming site, one of the developers of the new game, who was never even remotely involved in the development of the original, is credited as a “veteran of the original Flashpoint team”. If you add up all such little misunderstandings, like Codemasters reps saying what “we did when we made the original Operation Flashpoint” etc. you may end up with seriously distracted image of the entire situation created in minds of journalists and gamers.

I also feel this case is somewhat interesting in more general way than only this particular situation between two particular companies. Not so much for gamers, they simply will play games they like and enjoy, but more for the gaming industry. I think it raises some interesting questions with the main one being: Is it really enough for this industry just to stick a name on a box to claim it’s “the official sequel”? Are games really just “franchises” or is there something more in them, something that could be considered an art form?

RPS: Did you attempt to talk to Codemasters before releasing the press release?

Marek Spanel: No we didn’t, usually we would prefer to resolve problems in private, but after some of the recent “behind the scenes” movements there wasn’t really much space left to talk… The press release covers the situation only partially and is focused only on matters we feel really need to be said publicly.

RPS: As an example of a developer in a similar situation and choosing to take an alternative direction, Monolith ran a competition for the readers to choose the name to their “real” sequel to FEAR. As well as playing to the fanbase, it introduce the idea to a lot of gamers that the “real” sequel of FEAR wasn’t actually what their publisher was making. Of course, in the end, they managed to get their name back, but it’s an interesting tactic to take. Did you consider something less confrontational?

Marek Spanel: As mentioned before, I don’t believe that it’s really possible to draw parallels from the past situations of other developer facing a similar situation, all developer/publisher relationships are unique and what may seem on paper to be similar from an external perspective is rarely similar in its actual nature. Of course we considered other options, and I believe some of them were fairly smart, but the surprising turn of events, just a few days after we’d already started preparations for that plan, meant we had to completely re-think our strategy in order to avoid some serious threats to our company. However, some of our plans that are more creative still may happen in future.

RPS: It’s an interesting thing – if you follow the situation where a game’s name went one way and the actual developers (and often their engine) went another… well, the developer almost always wins. The only even *draw* I can think of is Far Cry 2 and Crysis. What do you think of that? History seems to be on your side.

Marek Spanel: Well, perhaps Crytek were a little smarter or a little luckier than us in this case as they had benefits from both titles due to way how it was handled. Also, in contrary to what you say I would estimate that Far Cry 2 sold substantially more copies, at least because of the platforms it was published for. And if you compare the marketing and PR support that Crysis received, with what we have for ARMA II, you would see another significant difference.

That said, it will be very interesting to see the final round of the duel between our game and Codemasters’ new game, as both try to build upon the original Operation Flashpoint in one way or another. We are putting as much effort and passion into ARMA II as we did for the original game, and I am sure our competition at Codemasters is also trying hard to come up with a remarkable experience, which is a win-win situation for everyone, especially for gamers. Despite our company’s track record, in terms of sales of the original Operation Flashpoint Cold War Crisis, as well as awards and recognition both in the press and from the gaming community, we really are back to being the underdogs again, so we’re in the position where we can only surprise the gaming audience, but we shall see where everyone stands when the dust settles, as the rhapsody goes: “I am just a poor boy, I need no sympathy, because I am easy come, easy go, a little high, little low, anyway the wind blows, doesn’t really matter to me…”, to end on classic Queen quote. After all, it doesn’t matter if history or anything else will be on our side, unless gamers are. That simply depends on how good game we will manage to create and there also goes most of our efforts. This public statement is very insignificant to the final quality of our next game anyway.

RPS: Thanks for your time.

__________________

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137 Comments »

  1. Dominic White says:

    Really, this is all you need to know:

    OFP, ARMA and ARMA 2 are the civillian adaptations of real military training sims – the Virtual Battlespace system.

    OFP2 is developed purely as a game.

  2. Heliocentric says:

    Codemasters have issued a rebuttal.

    Fat bottomed girls make the rocking world go round

  3. Zaphid says:

    Dominic: OFP was also the first game that showed that there is a large number of people who like to be virtual soldiers in a simulation as close to reality as possible, don’t underestimate that. And i though that VBS was developed after the publishing of OFP? Maybe it was the other way around with Arma.

    OFP2 will probably sell more initially and arma 2 will have stronger community which in the end will also mean more sales…

  4. rob says:

    “OFP2 will probably sell more initially and arma 2 will have stronger community which in the end will also mean more sales…”

    Given the strength of the Operation Flashpoint and Armed Assault communities I sincerely doubt this will be the case. Those people are scarily dedicated.

  5. Gap Gen says:

    “Let’s start a war! Start a nuclear war!
    At the gay bar, gay bar, gay bar…”

    Anyway, I will definitely buy ArmAII and probably buy OpF2, depending on reception. I haven’t got a definite sense of the gameplay in OpF2 yet, but for ArmA I assume there will be some continuity of the feel, although hopefully a bit less clunky.

    I think the modability and sandbox nature of ArmA lend to its charm. There are a number of comedy moments we’ve had when things have gone horribly wrong, such as blowing up the ladder we needed to climb to rescue our friend, or stealing a motorbike only to fall off and break my legs. It’s a shame the campaign for ArmA wasn’t so good, but the build-up for ArmA2 does look promising.

    It’s a shame that the split has been so acrimonious, but hopefully it means that we get two great realistic military sims rather than just one.

  6. Turin Turambar says:

    The most interesting little fact is that it seems Bohemia not only have the rights of the first Opf and the technology, but they also have the exclusive rights to make new sequels of the first game, they only don’t have the trademark name. So, technically Codemasters shouldn’t go saying “Opf2: the sequel to Operation Flashpoint, the return!”, the rights to make sequels are from Bohemia.

  7. The_B says:

    But still, the important question hasn’t been asked.

    What is it good for?

  8. Zaphid says:

    The greater good.

    j/k

    Probably to give a shout to “mainstream” gamers through the media about the fact that OFP2 is in fact not really sequel? I mean the OFP/Arma community knows so who else could be their target for this PR ?

  9. teo says:

    Is this PC exclusive? It needs to be for the gameplay to stay intact

  10. Tworak says:

    Whichever game runs worse is the true heir to the Flashpoint name. FACT!

  11. JonFitt says:

    @Heliocentric: Excellent!

    I will be looking to buy the one which most accurately improves on what made OpF good for me.
    ARMA was not it. The cludgy interface, buggy engine, and ropey missions were not what made OpF great for me!

    As far as I’m concerned both teams are have the same chance to produce the spiritual successor to OpF. Let the games begin!

  12. dsmart says:

    To be fair, they do have a point and a valid claim. Codemasters marketing are, IMO, appeat to be deliberately attempting to capitalize on the popularity of the original game in an attempt to obfuscate the facts.

    Ask yourself this: Why wouldn’t they? After all, as the original publishers, they no doubt contributed a great deal to the success of the original by way of marketing and such. If they didn’t have a vested interest in the IP, they’d have have agreed to keep the name. In an industry where new IPs with multi-million budgets are crapping (see Dead Space, Mirrors Edge and every other new IP launched in 2008 by a major publisher) out at retail, publishers know that what works is familiarity.

    …but only if you were under a toadstool since you crash landed on Earth – and haven’t been playing fps games since you crawled out of your diapers – would you not know the difference between the original OPF game and whatever “sequel” these two parties are cooking up.

    As for gamers, I wouldn’t be too concerned if I were them. ArmA was a rushed release and a sordid mess of bugs – most of which remain unfixed – and totally for the hardcore no-life-having military game bot. From what we’ve seen – and heard – of ArmAII, its shaping up to be more of the same. So I don’t think Codemasters is even remotely worried about who is going to prevail at retail. My money on is OFP2 trashing ArmaII at retail. Which, in itself, is really inconsequential since whatever Codemasters is spending on OFP2 will typically eclipse whatever Bohemia could possibly hope to pull out of a stocking on Christmas day. What matters is: who gets to turn a profit.

    The point about the media quoting rubbish and attributing stuff to people who probably never even laid eyes on the original, let alone play it, speaks to the sorry ass state of the gaming media as a whole. Most of these tools don’t even bother checking sources, doing fact checks or anything like that anymore. In an era when every tit is a typist, its easy to just put up a bunch of crap into circulation regardless of whether or not it is newsworthy, let along accurate and/or factual.

    …another day in the life of the gaming industry.

  13. M_the_C says:

    I think that this competition is going to be good.

    Yes OFP2 is going to be less of a simulator, but if they go too far way then they’ll just alienate people. Having two companies scrapping for first place could make being a gamer very interesting when they’re released.

    On the news announcement, I agree with the general view so far, Codemasters should tone down the ‘We’re the true sequel’ message.

  14. Tei says:

    I don’t know, I don’t care. I don’t even want to make some sense of all of this. Or what is the moral right option. I am coward and amoral. I just want to play again something as fun as the original Operation Flashpoint. Feel again that.
    ArmA.. good game, I dont like it. Who make’s me another OFP will get my money.

  15. Senethro says:

    “ArmA was a rushed release and a sordid mess of bugs – most of which remain unfixed – and totally for the hardcore no-life-having military game bot.”

    Irony detected!

  16. dsmart says:

    I wonder how Far Cry 2 fared against Crysis at retail. Need to check up on that. Both were good games but with totally different directions and game play. Both borne of the same franchise. It would have been fun to watch an EA vs Ubisoft marketing fiasco from the sidelines and along the sames lines as what is happening now. But no, that would be too easy. Instead those sensible bastards decided to just throw it all out there and let the gamers make the call.

    It think the whole OFP2 vs ArmaII rhetoric is also heating up because both games are launching this year I believe.

    Oh man, I sure hope Bohemia isn’t even considering putting ArmaII on any console. That would be one train wreck I’d buy tickets to watch.

  17. Xercies says:

    Hmm I’m split on what to get, i’ll look at the reviews to see which one is the best at being a good sequel to OP flashpoint. If it has a mission maker(which I will make lots of sniper missions like I did in the first one) and its so realistc that your scared of a couple of soldiers then I will buy that one.

  18. dsmart says:

    Irony detected!

    Not sure what you’re going on about there. Especially since one can probably give a list of games that fall into that category. No, I don’t have any games in that category – but the otherwise un-informative jab is noted.

  19. dsmart says:

    @ Xercies

    I guess you’ll be buying ArmaII then. :D

  20. Dominic White says:

    dsmart: Actually, Operation Flashpoint 1 got an Xbox port, and it was VERY good. Nothing sacrificed in the campaign itself, and the realism was untouched. It actually ran on a later version of the engine, too, so looked better than the PC version in some places.

    Only real downside was that the mission editor, while included, was pretty bare-bones and the multiplayer wasn’t much cop. Still, it proved that you can take complex PC sims to consoles without dumbing them down at all.

  21. Senethro says:

    dsmart: Its no fun if I have to explain it! My point was that some of your games have been… difficult to play to the extent that deriding a communitys dedication as being “hardcore no-life-having military game bots” is a bit rich.

  22. Turin Turambar says:

    BTW, the expansion addon of ArmA had a much better campaign. Pity that most people couldn’t try it, as the original ArmA campaign was so underwhelming.

    Still, all seems to indicate that Bohemia has learned their lesson with the first ArmA.

  23. Tei says:

    There can be made a simple (ridiculous) list, with description of how the games feel:

    FarCry was engineered + crafted
    FarCry 2 is half-crafted + half-engineered + half-painted
    Crysis is engineered + crafted
    Operation Flashpoint was painted + engineered
    ArmA is engineered

    leyend:
    engineered: tecnical merits
    crafted: obvious production merits
    painted: genius artistic merits

    The future games:
    ArmA2 engineered
    OFP2 crafted + half-engineered

  24. drewski says:

    Maybe if big publishers tried releasing a good game in a new IP, instead of generic space action games and nonsensically linear, horribly written “free running” games, the new IPs would have a chance.

  25. teo says:

    Who cares about Flashpoint 2
    No publisher in today’s world would put out a worthy sequel to Flashpoint with such a huge budget. It’s a console game FFS

    Just forget about it

  26. Heliocentric says:

    I just made a toasty, it had intense conflict between the cheese and ham. And accurately simulated the cold war. By being mostly in the fridge pre toasting, the fear and tension of ofp have carried over as one mistake and it’ll be all over.

    I should get a plate.

  27. DeuceMojo says:

    Let’s start a war, we need the space. It can start in New Jersey.

    I must thank RPS for even clueing me in to the existence of Arma2. Yea! Can’t wait.

  28. Heliocentric says:

    Oh, also.

    Terrain

  29. DeuceMojo says:

    @Tei: Thanks for half-clearing that up.

  30. Tei says:

    Making a ambush for 3 tank in OFP was like hunting a leopard with the bare hands. The hunter become hunted If can’t control the uncontrollable with a terrible beast that can finish the game in a blink.

  31. dsmart says:

    Actually, Operation Flashpoint 1 got an Xbox port, and it was VERY good. Nothing sacrificed in the campaign itself, and the realism was untouched. It actually ran on a later version of the engine, too, so looked better than the PC version in some places.

    Yes, thats the point that I was trying to make actually. You see, since XBox1, the bar for console shooters has been raised so high (OK, Halo not included) that if they were to even dream of porting ArmaII in today’s market, right after the publisher – and probably MS – stopped laughing, they’d all just take the Red pill and call it a day.

    Today’s console shooters are brain dead affairs. A category in which the likes of Arma or ArmaII for that matter, have no place. They’d just tank. Spectacularly. Its bad enough getting mainstream games to turn a profit on the console.

    No publisher in today’s world would put out a worthy sequel to Flashpoint with such a huge budget. It’s a console game FFS

    Its not even about the budget, but more about gamers. When you’re targeting the console demographic, all bets are off and the prudent thing to do is to play it safe: play dumb, then go clean, clear and naked.

    dsmart: Its no fun if I have to explain it! My point was that some of your games have been… difficult to play to the extent that deriding a communitys dedication as being “hardcore no-life-having military game bots” is a bit rich.

    uhm, er, wot?! I wasn’t deriding anyone. I made a spot on target assessment I thought. So what? I can’t liken dedicated balls-to-wall hardcore fps gamers to military game bots anymore? Are you trying to pick a fight or just start one? Or maybe you’re just being a smart ass and I needn’t have bothered to respond.

  32. PHeMoX says:

    Quoted:”Really, this is all you need to know:

    OFP, ARMA and ARMA 2 are the civillian adaptations of real military training sims – the Virtual Battlespace system.

    OFP2 is developed purely as a game.”

    Actually that’s not entirely true. Operation Flashpoint was made entirely with gamers in mind, in fact, with mostly multiplayer-only in mind. There have been other games made by Bohemia that served as simulations for the military, sure, but they were of a totally different kind.

    Quoted:”As to the confrontation and timing… well, recently Codemasters have started to promote their new Operation Flashpoint (2) Dragon Rising heavily in way that we believe misleadingly publicize their game as the “official sequel” to our Operation Flashpoint Cold War Crisis so we simply expressed our view on the entire situation.”

    And still they shouldn’t have sold the name. Especially after ARMA 1 which did not really do anything spectacularly impressive, except for the fact of being a better looking remake of the first Operation Flashpoint.

    ARMA II is going to be underestimated at best by the majority of people, perhaps even totally ignored in the worst case scenario. This is assuming ARMA II will be an excellent game and greater true sequel to Operation Flashpoint than OF2 is going to be.

    In my humble opinion, Bohemia shouldn’t have made ARMA 1, but should have gone straight for gold instead making a true Operation Flashpoint sequel. This would have made the ARMA franchise a lot stronger than it currently is. It has a bad taste even though I like the game, because it has ‘easy money’ and ‘remake’ written all over it.

  33. Pags says:

    Just a continuation of Phemox’s thoughts: if Bohemia were that concerned with having an established name to build upon, then they really should’ve put out ArmA in a much more stable state than how it first came out – of course, I could also go into how really the game needed to be more than just a prettier version of OPF but that really isn’t fair on them, so I won’t go there.

  34. Ginger Yellow says:

    One old Czech proverb says “a lie repeated a hundred times becomes the truth”

    Czech’s must be more resistant to bullshit. Over here it’s just three times.

  35. Pags says:

    That said, I do think they’re rather justified in their concern that Codemasters are selling their product as the “real sequel to OPF”.

  36. Gap Gen says:

    Marek should get on this comments thread. Hell, I’d pay to see a developer fight. Either over the honour of the game, or over the rights to names ending in “rek”.

  37. Gap Gen says:

    And yeah, ArmA is *really* not a console shooter. For a game where you need to be able to accurately fire at something over a kilometre away, I don’t think a controller is that good an idea.

  38. Senethro says:

    Can’t see myself buying a console until one of them caves in and starts offering mouse support.

    Low mouse sensitivity for long range, precise tracking aim.
    High sensitivity for rapid response flickshots.

  39. DigitalSignalX says:

    Both games have their merits, I think Tei illustrated it perfectly, and both have their attraction. An inch-by-inch fear of a single bullet clinical vs. a more visually and story driven shooter; both can be improved upon greatly with a solid sequel.

    This debate hopefully will motivate the sides to make BOTH sequels even better, a win-win situation for us.

  40. psyk says:

    Which is hopefully why they wont support mice, my ms laser mouse 6000 is rubbish compared to my steel series ikari it makes it a non equal playing field which is one of the nice things about playing on console everyone is using the same input device (maybe you can get a controller that is better than the ones you get when you buy the console if so that argument is moot.)

  41. dsmart says:

    In my humble opinion, Bohemia shouldn’t have made ARMA 1, but should have gone straight for gold instead making a true Operation Flashpoint sequel. This would have made the ARMA franchise a lot stronger than it currently is. It has a bad taste even though I like the game, because it has ‘easy money’ and ‘remake’ written all over it.

    True. But when you don’t have a publisher, but have a studio to run, families to feed and BILLS TO PAY, that source sitting around doing nothing is as good a meal ticket as any. Sure, the short term game – of quick money – is not the optimal solution when you’re thinking long term; but my guess is that there are LOT of dead or dying studios out there who wished they actually owned their own stuff so they get to make the call.

    The math is simple. Spend a year and make a game based on legacy code and hope it sells, or go bust doing nothing.

    The result of the genius decision above was ArmAII; and I can’t see anything wrong with that. Sure it could’ve been better polished and such, but again, you live by the bug, you die by the bug. ArmAII is going to die by the bug for same reason that the previous people stated: gamers are already burned by ArmaAI and at best are either going to pirate it or take a wait and see approach.

  42. Deuteronomy says:

    dsmart

    Are you even a PC Gamer? As a “military game-bot” I can assure you I have a girlfriend, friends, job, and life. Can you imagine how much poorer the gaming world would be without simulation-style games like OpFlash? Probably not.

    Out of respect for this site I haven’t truly expressed my opinion about your opinion.

  43. dsmart says:

    Are you even a PC Gamer?

    Does this answer your question?

    …and thats just what I have in my game room at home.

    Gaming library size to date? Almost 10K games and climbing. I have a $175 a month air conditioned storage unit that helps to also answer your question.

    As a “military game-bot” I can assure you I have a girlfriend, friends, job, and life.

    ..and who doesn’t have any of those things?

    The term “no life having” doesn’t even equate to what you are alluding to.

    Instead of being trigger happy, you might want to stop, listen and THINK before engaging your fingers. Wars have been started, fought and lost for less.

    Can you imagine how much poorer the gaming world would be without simulation-style games like OpFlash? Probably not.

    Irrelevant and inconsequential argument. And considering the state of “simulation” gaming, what you just said is, well, rubbish.

    Out of respect for this site I haven’t truly expressed my opinion about your opinion.

    aaaaww. He’s cute, ain’t he? Can we keep him?

  44. Deuteronomy says:

    Ahhhh.

  45. dsmart says:

    Deuteronomy: Wikipedia says this. And indeed this.

    Oh look, here come the attacks. I better go get a fresh pais of Depends. When idiots can’t hold an argument, the first thing they do is whip out the race or controversy card. Yah, like that has had ANY effect on me whatsoever. So uhm, yeah, go ahead, derail the thread.

  46. Deuteronomy says:

    I have fed the proverbial ultra-troll.

  47. Frankie The Patrician[PF] says:

    *waves at Derek Smart* o/

    Anyhow, where’s the popcorn and soda? It’s fun to watch them fight, even thou I should support BI as I am Czech, but well…I will never forget the StarForce dagger in the back and us Czechs being free testers for them..

  48. dsmart says:

    Both games have their merits, I think Tei illustrated it perfectly, and both have their attraction. An inch-by-inch fear of a single bullet clinical vs. a more visually and story driven shooter; both can be improved upon greatly with a solid sequel.

    This debate hopefully will motivate the sides to make BOTH sequels even better, a win-win situation for us.

    Exactly. Hence the reason I was drawing up the Crysis vs Far Cry 2 comparison. At the end of the day, gamers will either vote with their dollars or get blinded by the usually marketing bullshit and up with the wrong product.

  49. EBass says:

    As a Flashpoint veteran I’m putting my vote behind Codemaster’s game being superior. Why? For a number of reasons.

    These Eastern European developers have a habit of making great games, then simply adding more of the same in the sequals without fixing all the massive of flaws in the game which led the community to class it as a “rough gem”. Stalker, Soldiers Hereos of WW2, H&D, IL-2 etc etc.

    This pattern continued with Armed Assault. Flashpoint was (and is) one of my favorite games ever, but no one could deny it was very “rough”. Dodgy animations, bad individual AI, very clunky control method. When we got Armed Assault it had errrr Dodgy animations (most were exactly the same as OFP), bad individual AI (after a month of solid experimenting I could barely see a difference between its and flashpoints AI), the same control method.

    All the gameplay vids I’ve seen of Arma2 and most of the press release seems to tell me that BiS aren’t particularly interested in fixing the glaring flaws in their game and instead seem to be focusing on how much content they can put in.

    Granted Codemasters haven’t come out with a wealth of information, but I’m getting a good vibe from the game. Not to sound arrogant, but I can’t really remember many times when my vibeometer has been significantly off.

    I was a BiS fan, but the totally uninspired Armed Assault killed that. Its up to BiS to convince me their game is fixed, not the other way round.

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