The Whispered World Demo (In German)

By John Walker on September 15th, 2009 at 11:31 pm.

The animation isn't smooth, but it is lovely.

Talking of demos I can’t understand, the gorgeous point and click adventure The Whispered World has a demo out. In German. Which I don’t speak a word of. Which makes me sad, because it looks fantastic. However, I’m aware that people reading this site can speak German! Especially the ones in Germany. So it’s good news for you. And for the rest of us, it’s a chance to remember that The Whispered World is coming, and will be translated.

For a moment I did wonder if my brain had developed the ability to learn new languages like those universal translators on Star Trek. I listened to a lot of unintelligible words, and then heard the main character say, “That is so unfair.” But I think it might just be a weird glitch of language, as sadly it all went back into the reason I didn’t get very good marks in German lessons.

Wait, can I... Oh, no.

I first spotted it back in March 08 (good grief, that long?), as one of three adventures being made by Daedalic, and it immediately intrigued me with its melancholic style. Then things went a bit quiet. Then things looked troubling, with secret journo site Games Press still giving its release date as Q1 2009. However, with the appearance of the German demo, and assurances that it will indeed be receiving an English translation, there’s reason to start getting interested in this cute little game again.

So, German speakers, play this and tell us whether it’s any good.

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40 Comments »

  1. tycho says:

    wow, looks pretty – is the gameplay/puzzles any good?

  2. Pags says:

    I don’t understand how something like this could’ve happened; the Germans are incapable of whispering.

  3. Rive says:

    Vat? I resent that notion.

  4. Railick says:

    I wasn’t aware I was reading Stein,Papier,Schrotbüchse

    Bitte klicken Sie weiter

  5. Bjoern Roepstorff says:

    German language borrows many words from other languages. Frequently used words (so called loanwords) are “unfair”, “computer”, “keyboard”, “countdown”, “headset”, “mousepad” (spelled Mauspad in german) or even “handy” which, funnily enough, refers to a cellphone.

    What’s worse though is the tendency of younger people to use internet acronyms as part of their normal language. Hearing a kid say: “LOL, this is funny” makes me sad.

  6. Jonas says:

    I might be tempted to add that pretty much all languages borrow many words from other languages, particularly English words, thanks to American imperialism (and the fact that they churn out awesome inventions at a frankly ridiculous rate). Even English has stolen a fair few words from other languages… such as Kindergarten ^_^

  7. Gap Gen says:

    Railick: You forget to revel in the ability to make very long words. I’m pretty sure the German version of this site should be called Steinpapierschrotbüchsezahnbürste.

  8. Smee says:

    @Jonas: Sorry, “Even English has stolen a fair few words”? That seems to be an understatement of the absolute highest order.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lists_of_English_loanwords_by_country_or_language_of_origin

  9. Jonas says:

    I know :-)

    Cool list though. Wikipedia has so many awesome lists. I wonder if it has a list of cool Wikipedia lists…

  10. Railick says:

    lmao I’m not that good at German so I missed out :)

    Is it racist that I read all German text (in my mind and sometimes out loud) In a huge Nazi accent? I’m thinking it is and I should probably stop (it is also incentive) I’m warry of even using the N word on here at all. I just love the accent, (not the people or the ideas they support) It is very powerful and fun to talk like that. I’m afraid one time I’m going to doing my horrible German accent near a German visiting and really hurt their feelings :(

  11. Monocle & Sauerkraut says:

    Whispered World is a wonderful experience, I enjoyed every single minute of it. I hope the english synchron turns out as good as the german one. Is there a translated version of Daedalus’ other great adventure, Edna’s Escape btw.?

  12. Railick says:

    some of these aren’t freaking loan words they are the name of something German O.o They list Fraktur, a type face, and Bratwurst which is . . Bratwurst???!?! We didn’t borrow the word we borrowed the food mate (And omfg are they delicious and dangerous to cook on a grill. I’ve almost burned my house down several times because of Bratwurst grease fires lol)

  13. Igor Hardy says:

    The demooffers quite a lengthy bit. The majority of it I finished only thanks to consulting the walkthrough which I normally try to avoid doing. I loved the feel of the game for its audio-visual presentation, but… theres some terrible pixel-hunting (even the hotspot highlighting doesn’t help too much sometimes), and most puzzles didn’t make much sense to me.

    Things like not being able to take a stick lying in the center of a location, but needing to take one that is hidden behind a rock and pretty much invisible is just being mean to the player.

  14. Alex says:

    No one who speaks German could be an evil man!

  15. joni says:

    This looks cool, a pitty it’s in german

  16. coupsan says:

    PfffttTTHAHA, foreign languages. I tackle all challenges with brute force. This demo will be no problem for me.

  17. Ozzie says:

    I pre-odered the game and already finished it for some time.
    I can’t speak of it very subjectively I guess, since the buggyness made me very…emotionally charged, you could say.
    Lots of bluescreens and crashes made me very angry, especially since you always have to dice your way in the game again. Yup, the copy protection is reminiscient of Monkey Island and Co., which is fine by itself, IF THE GAME WOULDN’T CRASH ALL THE TIME!
    To be fair, not everyone had these problems, actually, only a minority.
    The autosave option wasn’t very reliable either so sometimes I had to replay big parts.

    Apart from stability concerns, the game has an awesome presentation (with the exception of cutscenes and animations in a few scenes) and the puzzles are mostly fun, often quite hard and sometimes obscure.
    The interactions density is not quite as high as in Edna & Harvey: The Breakout, but you recieve a unique commentary to most actions.
    The game has a serious tone, but it is still quite humorous. Sadwick’s comments made me laugh many times and some characters are delightfully deranged. The evil guys aren’t very convincingly evil, though.
    The interface allows more experimentation than most modern adventures. It is similar to the one in Monkey Island 3.

    All in all, apart from the buggyness, it’s a very good adventure with a moving ending, but not quite as good as the debut title from Daedalic.

  18. Ozzie says:

    Oh, btw, Daedalic announced a new game called Deponia a while ago: http://www.adventuregamers.com/gameinfo.php?id=1550

  19. Alaric says:

    Und ze damned bosches vuldn’t even update zeir Facebook peige in English. Vai to treet (potenshial) castomers.

  20. Batolemaeus says:

    You will soooo hate that Tropico 3 has a demo out, too.

    In German.

    Ahahaaa.

  21. Vinraith says:

    @Batolemaeus

    Umm, Tropico 3 has a demo out in English, it was posted about here a couple of days ago.

  22. Marshall says:

    @Bjoern

    It IS sad, but when kids take their out-loud pronunciations and reincorporate them into webspeak, it is meta and therefore funny/acceptable.

    Lawl.

  23. Kommissar Nicko says:

    Speaking of Tropico 3 demo, anybody notice that tutorial guy sounds like he can’t decide if he’s doing a bad Spanish accent, or a bad Russian accent?

    Anyway, schwerpunktprinzip ober das, ja?

  24. Rinox says:

    @ Railick

    There is no such thing as a ‘nazi accent’. That’s like saying there is a communist accent. What you’re referring too is probably a comical exaggeration of some of the harsher tones in German, but there’s no need to call it ‘nazi’. I don’t want to sound like a prick but I’m just sayin’, that is the kind of talk that might offend someone from Germany, not speaking a cartoon version of their language.

  25. def says:

    Hey John,

    if you’d like to play through the demo with an “in situ” live translation done via voicechat (german here with fairly good skills in american english), drop me a line.

  26. phil says:

    Strangely, having a German girlfriend of two years hasn’t incentivised me to learn the language beyond amusing gibberish from guide books like “Der hummer ist klein und rot,” this game actually might.

  27. Heliocentric says:

    She hasn’t wanted you to learn so she can talk behind your back! Just like foreign shopkeepers.

  28. Lambchops says:

    My favourite list on the Wiki page was “list of English words with Scots origin.” I can understand the list with words from Scots Gaelic but surely English words with Scots origin is just dialect words finding their way into the common venacular?

    • Andrew Dunn says:

      Scots and English are separate languages that developed from the same root – they’re significantly different and have a lot of different vocabulary.

      The relationship between the two is like that between Dutch and German, in a way.

  29. Pod says:

    I wonder waht English would look like without a single Loanword? Would the Oxford English Dictionary be only 5 pages long? [Would it even be called that?]

  30. Pod says:

    D

    die
    deyja (=”pass away”)
    dirt
    drit (=”feces”)
    dregs
    dregg (=”sediment”)

    Old Norse has the best words.

  31. Frankie The Patrician[PF] says:

    I watched Postal: The Movie and Mein Fuehrer in German, so this shan’t be a problem..

  32. maple story hack says:

    I think this one is very cool, and the character which is shown in pic looks like a dwarf.

  33. St4ud3 says:

    @Railick: I don’t think you would hurt any feelings, but you would be considered a retard :P

    I’m German, but I don’t have the time to play it right now :/

  34. Kakksakkamaddafakka says:

    Pod:

    You also fucked the use of “sky”. That’s actually close to the old norse name for clouds (in Norway we call them “skyer” in plural, “sky” is one cloud). I believe that “bag” is also old norse, if I’m not mistaken.

  35. Kakksakkamaddafakka says:

    Wow, nice going there. There’s an “up” missing in the last post.

  36. Jochen Scheisse says:

    I don’t understand how something like this could’ve happened; the Germans are incapable of whispering.

    OMG RACIAL PROFILING!

  37. Theory says:

    Is that some kind of atomic stove in the screenshot?

  38. Herman the German says:

    Yes, we actually used atomic stoves in the old days…

    Make sure to buy the game, it is definitely one of the best adventure games ever created. Only the ending was a bit… well, you’ll see for yourself.

  39. bill canning says:

    where do you find the fifth Yaki

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