Tiberium Loremaster: C&C4′s Samuel Bass

By Jim Rossignol on March 16th, 2010 at 9:10 am.


Command & Conquer 4 arrives this week to the tutting of sceptics. The new game is different: no base-building, no economy. It’s also the end of the Tiberium saga. What does it all mean? The man responsible for concluding Kane is Samuel Bass, and last night we spoke to him about the end of the Tiberium saga, experimental RTSs, the value of the PC, King’s Bounty, and the dreaded DRM. Read on for international interview interest.

RPS: Hello, Mr Bass. Can you start off by explaining yourself, and describing what your job entails?

Bass: I’m one of the lead designers on C&C4, and we have a couple. I was the campaign and story lead, I’m also the loremaster of the Tiberium universe, so I manage the fiction. But I was involved in pretty much every aspect of the game. I’ve been involved with EA for seven years and joined the RTS group with Battle For Middle Earth 2, I’ve worked on C&C3, Red Alert 3, and C&C4.

RPS: Can you explain how you ended up making C&C4? How did the project come to be?

Bass: Well, this was a little unusual. Normally a game is proposed by the main design team, they have a specific vision for what they want to do and then they work it through to completion, but C&C4 started off as a weird little skunkworks project, where we had a couple of our designers off in a corner experimenting with RTSes and trying to come up with ways to broaden the appear of the genre. They were playing around with how to change the standard model of destroying the other guy’s base, looking at how you might change the win/lose conditions… And at that time I was the lead on Kane’s Wrath, doing something quite traditional, and quite the opposite of where C&C4 would go. I joined the C&C4 project about a year and half ago, at which point the team had a design, with the basic tenets of the game including player progression and class system, the basic elements of the game. My job was to come on board and give it structure and narrative context.

Then the task was to refine this to make it into something we felt comfortable with putting out to the public. These skunkworks projects aren’t too dissimilar to making a mod, so you might have something fun but there’s a lot of work to do before you get to a finished game. So… I wrote the story, produced, ran the live-action FMV, which is really fun.

In short, I go to a lot of meetings.


RPS: Why don’t we actually find out the secret origin of Kane in C&C4? Weren’t we promised that all would be revealed?

Bass: Well yeah, interesting story. There was a big debate about how much of the Kane backstory to reveal, and part of the issue there was that the backstory have never very consistent. We spent a lot of time investigating it, talking to Westwood and so on, but there was never any consistency. We put a lot of stuff on the table, but we don’t say “Oh he’s the brother of Abel”, or do any of those Biblical origins ideas, which I really wanted to do. Let’s just say that there was a desire /not/ to do that for this game. Additionally, the C&C community is very hardcore – it’s been around since the start of the internet! – so I have tried to work to meet their expectations of the game, and the lore. It was a thorny one.

RPS: Is this actually the end of the Tiberium arc then?

Bass: Yes, it’s the end. The universe could continue, so if EA Hungary want to do another game in ten years time, they could do that. But this is very definitely the end of the Tiberium story. Any new C&C game would definitely need a new story.

RPS: And whose idea was that? Who ended Kane?

Bass: Well, EA wanted another C&C, so as good employees we said “no, problem” and gave them one. But ending the story came from me. I didn’t want to keep wheeling out Kane every two years and saying “Look, Kane! You like Kane! It’s C&C 2010!” There was no reason to do another game that was just another instalment of C&C3. Ending the story made sense, and I think the mechanical changes in the game set up the ending of the story. So there was some convergence there.

RPS: But why the different RTS model? Why do away with base-building in the first place? Isn’t that the point of C&C?

Bass: Well, some of the motivation came from the fact that we had a very small online multiplayer population. We started thinking “what can we do to get more players online together, playing these games?” All those players do is play a bit of single player and then they’re done – how can we get them online?

We had to make a model that didn’t cater solely for hardcore players, we wanted to cater for a range of different styles and play, which is why we went to the battlefield style of play. Gaining tickets and capturing areas is fairer because you aren’t just wiping people out completely. We’ve taken a lot of inspiration from the Battlefield games in that sense. The other thing was, well, I am nicknamed “The Turtle” because I am absolutely the turtling RTS player, and I like to hang back and build the huge army. That’s been becoming increasingly less viable in recent games, so we wanted to recreate that. We wanted to make that kind of play possible by allowing people lock down areas of the map. This led to the support class, which is the weirdest class we’ve done, in that it’s primarily air vehicles and support powers. Those things have fallen by the wayside a little, so we doubled up on it with C&C4. And I think that class allows a player who isn’t so familiar with this kind of game to come in and enjoy himself. He can enter a frantic 5v5 and really contribute something. That’s one of the reasons the beta playtest was started so early, so we could try and get that sort of thing right, and to see if all these classes would mesh together. I think they have.

Also, some stuff just came out of our prototyping. For example, the game doesn’t have an economy! We had an economy for the longest time, and then we just started to notice that no one ever really noticed that they had an economy, because there wasn’t a harvester on screen. It was just a number on a ticker, really, so why not turn it off? Why add a number you don’t need? We turned it off and no one noticed. Similar decisions were motivated by work on other titles. For example, Red Alert 3 could be relatively hardcore in that if you rolled out with a huge army and it was the /wrong/ huge army you could get crushed. We went for lower lethality this time. Even if you roll out with the wrong army here you can still feel like you are having an impact on the battlefield. It just lets a few more people in.

RPS: So you agree with the idea that the RTS needs to diversify to survive? Do you think the RTS will evolve into a more varied set of games?

Bass: I hope so. That’s my personal hope for the genre. It’s interesting because I am really enjoying Starcraft 2 – I’m crap at it and still playing – and I hope it sells a gazillion copies. But I think we need to not /just/ do that kind of game. We need to be doing other things: Dawn Of War 2 was a really brave stab in a new direction. Dawn of Chaos is haunting me, I must buy it online… anyway, we have to avoid turning into the flight sim genre, small but very hardcore. We just want to bring more people in. We were so sad to see Ensemble go… it shows a lack of publisher confidence, I think, because they don’t feel the genre has a capacity to grow and adapt. Whether or not people consider C&C4 a success or not, it’s a hopeful game.


RPS: Is part of this the difficulty in bringing traditional PC-based strategies to new audiences? And by new I mean console audiences?

Bass: We’ve taken a stab at it over the last few years – C&C4 is PC-only – we’ve done console version of our games, and we were still essentially PC developers. How much accommodation do you make for the console version of the game? Do we hurt the PC produce to make the console one better? I don’t think so. RTS games still present these problems. For example, when Halo, or even GoldenEye, came out people argued that you couldn’t play a shooter properly without a mouse and keyboard. Well, that difficulty pales in comparison to getting an RTS interface to work on a console. You can do it, and we’ve been making steps towards it, but you need you build from the ground up for the console. And get a bit lucky. I mean, look at Brutal Legend, the game was an RTS from the start, but those were the hardest bits of the game to get through. You end up with some crab-claw hand, pinching four buttons at once.

But I should stress that I don’t think PC gaming is going away, that was a false perception created by the drop in retail sales and the obviousness of piracy. PC gaming is coming back in a new form, moving online. Everyone’s getting in on it, EA has its own store now. I already prefer buying a game online to going and buying in a shop. And the PC is just so exciting, because you’re able do more experimental stuff without the influence of Sony or Microsoft, but more importantly because the audience is more willing to take risks. And we’re seeing revivals in old genres – look at the way Eastern European and Russian developers are bringing fun stuff to the table. I’ve been playing stupid amounts of King’s Bounty: Armoured Princess, which is awesome. And funny, because I actually work for Jon Van Canaghen now, who is the guy who made Heroes of Might and Magic, and there I am playing a Russian-developed spiritual sequel…

RPS: So there’s another issue with C&C4, which is that you’ve wandered into the always-on DRM warzone with the game’s single player. You’ll be expecting a horrific backlash over that then?

Bass: Yes, we’ve been following your coverage of the Ubisoft stuff on RPS. It surprised me… Assassin’s Creed 2 is /so/ single player. But anyway, yes, we’re going to take some flak for that. The DRM decisions are made so far in advance that there’s really not anything I can say. Red Alert 3 had a similar system and we got a lot of flak for that. At least with C&C4 we have the global player progression system, so there is actually a reason to be online. We need the game to communicate to with servers to stop people grinding their way to the top of tech tree. And I’d love to see a world without DRM, but then there are issues that DRM does help alleviate. Wasn’t it the case that when Demigod was out there and in pirate hands there were a million people hitting their servers? No one with a legitimate copy could play, or at least it made the situation worse.

I hope we’ll get through all this stuff to a middle ground, which helps minimise the effects of piracy, but doesn’t affect the player’s experience of the game.


RPS: There are ways to subvert this stuff too, like Introversion seeding Defcon onto bittorrent and then turning the pirate key off occasionally to bring in more paying players. There’s lots of opportunity here for piggybacking on the infrastructure the pirates have set up. Creative abuse of pirate systems…

Bass: Yeah, I think there is scope for being creative. The guy who did Gratuitous Space Battles took an interesting approach when he went and asked the pirates how he could make it more appealing for them to buy. I don’t know how that worked out for him, but it’s interesting. The problem for large companies is that even if there’s a desire to do that sort of thing, it’s very hard for us to change direction. I could say that I think we should do something like this, but someone else would disagree, and we’d make no headway. As the market moves increasingly online, however, I think there will be more opportunities for experimental ways in getting content to people. When there are few costs we’ll be able to put it out there and see what happens. Even when stuff is pirated you get a word of mouth out there, and just get people playing. We started our beta so early just to get people playing, because there’s no substitute for that.

RPS: I’m hoping that this is just an evolutionary phase we’re going through, and this kind of DRM will die off again as better solutions become clear.

Bass: Yes, I think someone will crack it and then everyone will jump on the bandwagon down the line. Whenever there’s a good idea everyone else jumps on board. That’s what’s best about the PC as a platform: the methodology can be fluid. What was gospel five years ago won’t be the case today. I mean look at Steam, we hated it when it came out because it stopped us playing Half-Life 2 right away, or whatever, but now it’s just part of the day-to-day experience as a PC gamer. And I think it’s an improvement. Go to a game store now and the PC games are on the shelf somewhere at the back. If it was a video shop it’d be where the porn was. On the other hand if you go on Steam or Impulse the games are immediate, with lots of different PC games at the forefront – ones that might not even be on the shelf at retail are right there, like King’s Bounty. Retail gravitates towards something familiar, while I think online you might take a chance and find something new.

RPS: Yeah, I do find myself rifling through Steam to see what they’ve put up that I’m not familiar with. We’ve found plenty of things to cover on RPS that way.

Bass: Absolutely, I wouldn’t have found The Witcher without it, and now I’m two thirds of the way through and hopelessly addicted.

RPS: We’re going to have to end there. Thanks for your time.

Command & Conquer 4: Tiberian Twilight is out today in North American and on the 19th in Europe.

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69 Comments »

  1. Flameberge says:

    Oh dear Jim, your interview has given humanity to an EA developer. Don’t you know that everyone wants to believe that EA is an evil entity controlled by a malovelent hive mind?

    • frymaster says:

      companies are amoral, people working for companies aren’t. Unless they run activision.

      And, I don’t know if it’s because of the splitting up of EA into different units, or it’s another symptom of the same desire to mix things up, or if it’s total coincidence, but since then, the output of EA seems to have gotten a lot more diverse and interesting.

    • Catastrophe says:

      Actually its kinda shown the opposite Flameberge, its shown that while there are “humans” working for EA, the way he explains how EA tells him to “Make a new C&C” and he does and the way they say “theres an always online DRM” and even though he disagrees with it theres “nothing he can say to change it” it kinda shows EA as a large emotionless machine, with powerless humans working for it as peons.

  2. jsdn says:

    This guy seems really down to Earth, wish there were more like him in the industry as of late. I did find it a bit amusing that he’s playing a lot of Starcraft 2, almost as though he’s admitting C&C4′s pre-eminent failure, but it shows he’s a gamer making games.

  3. StarDrowned says:

    Nice to hear from someone in the industry who actually sounds like a real gamer. I really shouldn’t be impressed by it, but it often seems that so many of them are out of touch, or something.

    Also, this is the first time I’ve been at all interested in C&C4, but then I made my way down to the DRM part… Still, I’m going to check out the reviews at least.

  4. Okami says:

    What a nice man.

  5. TheDudeBro says:

    Yup, pretty much what everyone else has said, sounds like a top bloke :P Was a good read !

  6. liquid says:

    I don’t care about such global progression stuff for single player. Most of the time I’d play a LAN game or with a friend within 200-300km away from me. Lost sale from a fan since the first RA/C&C games.

  7. Heliocentric says:

    This man was an excellent interviewee.
    Still, always on internet for singleplayer is bull, but i’m willing to put up with it as long as i get to play rental prices. I can’t even honestly boycott, if i see c&c4 for £5 I’d be all over drm or no.

  8. Pod says:

    >We’ve taken a lot of inspiration from the Battlefield games in that sense.

    Why not just come out and say “We played DOW/COH and realised how wrong C&C is” ?

  9. Rinox says:

    Good interview, seems like he has his heart in the right place. :-) Especially on the decision of ending the saga instead of milking it indefinitely.

    One thing I will say though, is that I’m not happy with the direction they took (ie the drastic gameplay formula change). I’m sure it’ll be a good game, I’m just not happy with the fact that they decided to go this direction for what is supposed to be the final part of one of the most prestigious brands in the industry. 10+ years and 3 games of traditional RTS with resources and base building, and on the final installment, the conclusion of the saga, the whole formula is turned around. It doesn’t make sense.

    Like I said, it may still be a good game, but it’s not the C&C style I grew up with it. Change isn’t bad, but please do it under a new franchise – don’t use the franchise to sell a formula that might otherwise not appeal to people (cfr Max Payne in Brazil).

    • Cradok says:

      Exactly my feelings on it. I’ve been playing C&C Tiberium games for 15 years, bought each and every one, and every mission pack, on day one. Changing the entire approach for what’s supposedly the Last Game Ever… ugh!

      Also, they could at least bloody commit on Kane.

  10. Collic says:

    I played the beta and I really didn’t like it at all, so I’ll be steering well clear. It has very similar look to red alert 3 so if that annoyed you, it may be safe to assume the aesthetic will grate here as well.

    I’m hoping someone will manage to liberate the in-game FMVs to youtube so I can enjoy the hammy acting and ridiculousness though.

    • godwin says:

      C&C has had horrible art direction since C&C3. You should look at the so-called concept art for C&C4, it’s been atrocious from the get-go. I’m astounded that someone like that even got hired at EA, but I’m glad they’re ending it.

  11. Sobric says:

    What nice man.

  12. Gunrun says:

    It still worries me that the game comes out today according to steam yet there isn’t a single review that I can find. Doesn’t bode well.

  13. Web Cole says:

    “Go to a game store now and the PC games are on the shelf somewhere at the back. If it was a video shop it’d be where the porn was.”

    What a very interesting observation.

    • Grunt says:

      But I should stress that I don’t think PC gaming is going away, that was a false perception created by the drop in retail sales and the obviousness of piracy. PC gaming is coming back in a new form, moving online. Everyone’s getting in on it, EA has its own store now. I already prefer buying a game online to going and buying in a shop. And the PC is just so exciting, because you’re able do more experimental stuff without the influence of Sony or Microsoft, but more importantly because the audience is more willing to take risks. And we’re seeing revivals in old genres – look at the way Eastern European and Russian developers are bringing fun stuff to the table. I’ve been playing stupid amounts of King’s Bounty: Armoured Princess, which is awesome. And funny, because I actually work for Jon Van Canaghen now, who is the guy who made Heroes of Might and Magic, and there I am playing a Russian-developed spiritual sequel…

      I wanted to cheer throughout this entire paragraph. :)

  14. Alec Meer says:

    Hold fast for a few hours! My review should be appearing on Eurogamer at some point today.

  15. Magic H8 Ball says:

    “…trying to come up with ways to broaden the appear of the genre.”

    Oh.

    *click*

  16. Kester says:

    Ooh, intriguing. I haven’t paid attention to C&C for a while, but this sounds like something I’d enjoy. Thanks for the interview!

  17. Internet Friend says:

    The very idea of a ‘lore master’ for keeping previous plots sorted makes me sad. Are those previous stories cool enough to warrant association?

    This has become almost cliche, but keeping sequel opportunities open by never committing to anything drains so much meaning from games.

    • Internet Friend says:

      Thinking a little more about it, a new narrative would probably require new art direction, and maybe even mechanics, but all people want is a more refined version of the previous game. Some games, Half life 2 for example, do a great job of keeping the plot from stagnating. Suggesting that more games be like half life 2 isn’t super-helpful though.

      One of the fine writers here should pontificate on this topic, as I’m not quite sure what to think.

      Also: replying to myself probably makes me a douche.

    • Rinox says:

      @ Internet Friend

      Douche

      (kidding)

  18. Alez says:

    So for the last game in the franchise….they change it so fans of the series get one up the ass while NEW players have the priority. Is that not a dick move? How is that not a dick move?

    Also, if you wanna make an rts with no base building, FINE, go ahead. I might enjoy your abomination, i did enjoy world in conflict and ground control 2 for example. But you DO NOT take a game that already had that and remove it, then it’s just half a game.. The hell with this game and dow2 and their running around the map playing tag.

    This is like if portal 1 would have been called half life 3. Even though it would have been a good game and even though it’s still the same universe….it’s not the same game anymore and you’d be a dick to try to cash in on the franchise like that.

    • Sobric says:

      I seriously doubt that this will be the last in the franchise. The last to blunder around Kane and Tiberium maybe, but the C&C IP will resurface at some point.

      And sorry if this sounds flippant (I’m not a huge fan of these serieses), but doesn’t Red Alert provide all your base building needs? Aren’t they kinda-almost the same game nowadays?

    • Collic says:

      Well the C&C and red Alert games were always pretty similar even from the beginning. The main difference was a fantasy sci-fi setting versus a fictional alternate reality where the cold war turned out to be a lot hotter. It was always the story and theme that set them apart rather than anything fundamental in the gameplay.

  19. robrob says:

    Great interview, really interesting to hear from someone who is clearly not a marketing drone. The whole base building and economy stuff has kept me away from RTS games since I played Red Alert as a wee lad so maybe this will get me back into C&C.

    I found it very difficult to stop reading this guy’s opinions. You could say I am totally addicted to Samuel Bass. Wha ow ow.

  20. Hunam says:

    I find the lack of promotion for this game a bit odd. Sure there are ads splashed about in the usual places but where are the video’s revealing the cast of the FMV’s? Before RA3 came out we had loads of stuff about who was in the game and cool interviews with them etc, this time it seems almost as if EA are just phoning it in.

    I did really enjoy the beta though, hopefully my fears are unfounded.

  21. thinkingork says:

    Wasn’t it the case that when Demigod was out there and in pirate hands there were a million people hitting their servers? No one with a legitimate copy could play, or at least it made the situation worse.

    And this is why this game is gonna suck. He is a lead designer, and he has no idea what is going on in his field.

    • Sobric says:

      1. He’s the lead Lore designer.

      2. Demigod isn’t his field. It’s a DotA-alike not an RTS.

      3. Isn’t that what happened? Perhaps it’s a rhetorical question?

    • sebmojo says:

      That was roughly what happened.

    • jalf says:

      How does your skill as lead designer depend on knowing what caused the most server load of another game from a different company?

    • thinkingork says:

      How does your skill as lead designer depend on knowing what caused the most server load of another game from a different company?

      Because Stardock has specifically clarified that the mess in Demigod’s launch was deal to a mistake in design, rather than piracy. The statement is specifically made so Demigod wouldn’t be used as an base to justify dis-servicing scheme like the one this game uses.

  22. Carra says:

    People who play always buy the game while single player games are pirated a lot more often.

    So it only makes sense to try and get more people to play online.

  23. Cooper says:

    Nice interview.

    I’m excited about C&C 4 simply because it’s a C&C game.

    I hope it’s not gone all ‘dark and gritty’. I don’t generally like RTS games, but I love the ‘story’ in the Tiberium arc games. Wonderfully camp. Also, been invested in it since my teens.

    • jalf says:

      Yep. It’s C&C. It’s got Kane in it. It’s got FMV’s. Of course I’ll get it.

      Who cares if there’s no base building or if the DRM eats your friends. It’s got Kane in it. And it’s officially the last in the story arc.

      I’m buying it.

    • godwin says:

      I’m pretty sure Sam Bass used exactly those words to describe the new FMVs; check out one of the latest videos on Gametrailers.

  24. DesolationJones says:

    I played the Beta and hated it, the most viable tactic for every class was some form of unit rush. The vast majority of players dropped before being defeated and it felt a bit too cartoony. On the other hand having bought the first decade boxset i’ve had stacks of fun with the “classic” cnc games. Definitely a case of if its not broken don’t fix it.

    Bloke from EA sounds awesome. This upsets me, i don’t like EA.

  25. lethial says:

    I prefer single player games, and always loved the campiness of the C&C universe. I ordered C&C4 on impulse before I knew about the whole online requirement. (I am not a fan of the game play changes either.)
    Thanks to this interview, I stopped my cancellation request.

  26. Hunam says:

    Alec’s Review on EG might make you want to hit the cancel button again.

  27. hoff says:

    “So you agree with the idea that the RTS needs to diversify to survive? Do you think the RTS will evolve into a more varied set of games?”

    Oh, come ON… guys, really? “Diversify”? “Evolve”? “More varied set of games”? They are REMOVING the RTS part and replacing it by some bizarre grinding/RPG mechanic and you mirror their marketing babble in the questions? That’s not “evoloversified variety”. That’s catering to the lowest common denominator in a desperate move of trying to change a franchise they obviously do not believe in anymore into a primitive version of what is essentially a different genre.

    Basically, I read RPS because it’s written for hardcore PC gaming lovers. Admit it, this is not a “casual gaming blog”. The whole interview, they were talking about how they are too scared to make a game for a niche (of millions of players?), so they removed everything that is risky. They just say, in multiple, colorful paragraphs of marketing speech, “This game is not made with a typical RPS reader or RTS player in mind. This game is NOT for you.” I don’t care about some jock who has no interest RTS games getting five minutes of fun out of it because it’s so “accessible”, then drop it forever because he’s just not the target group.

    StarCraft 2 is the ultimate example that you CAN do a proper RTS in 2010, get the online audience and get people excited. I’m so sick of the systematic removal of features being advertised as “innovation”.

  28. cjlr says:

    I afraid I must confess that I will definitely be buying this for the sake of a complete collection. Maybe not today, maybe not tomorrow, but someday, before it disappears from shelves forever – which I actually don’t think will be very far off. Hell, I actually missed RA3: Uprising that way, because they wiped that turd away within weeks.

    The whole process was entirely half-assed. There may have been good ideas and good intentions from a lot of people, including the charmingly sympathetic interviewee here, but the end result is mediocre, shallow, and has no charm of its own. I shall say no more than this: respawns. In an RTS game. Piss.

    Anybody remember the last time there was a C&C game with no base building and a completely multiplayer focus? It was called Sole Survivor, and it was fucking terrible.

  29. Radiant says:

    He sounds like a really lovely guy.

    Well they all do until you get a zillion titan tanks stomping into your base.

  30. Radiant says:

    I’ve been going back to DOW2 and I am really enjoying the baseless units only single player it really fits my mindset.
    [Basically advance wars grown up].

    Hopefully C&C4 is good.

  31. LintMan says:

    Wait – you have to always be online in C&C4, even in single player? Really!?!? How did I miss that news?

    One less game to buy, then. A shame – I would have bought it just to see the conclusion of the story.

  32. pinbag says:

    Im buying it when steam goes banana’s and sells it for 5 bucks…

    I loved the end year sale !!!

  33. Samuel Bass says:

    Wow, that came across as more coherent than I remembered. Thanks to Jim for letting me blather into the phone for far too long. Also, hope people enjoy CNC4, it’s a weird little thing, but I think it came out pretty interesting nonetheless.

  34. amishmonster says:

    Yeah, it’s been said before but he just seems nice, well-informed, and quite sharp. Good interview!

  35. Vinraith says:

    The irony with all of these “online all the time” single player games is that the only way they’ll ever see a cent of my money is if their DRM system is cracked. If they succeed in preventing the system from being breached, I can’t buy the game as it’s unacceptable to pay money for something I can’t play whenever and wherever I like. If it IS cracked, I might pick it up for $5 down the road.

    Of course, if they’d done something more reasonable to begin with, they might have gotten quite a bit more. They can be as pleasant and reasonable-sounding about this as they like (and Mr. Bass composes himself quite well, here), it’s still a flatly unreasonable requirement that fundamentally cripples the single player game.

  36. Bowlby says:

    I read Alec’s review on EG and I was saddened to hear what they’d done to C&C. However, even if it was universally crowned as the best game in the series, I still wouldn’t buy it. I simply cannot support this awful DRM.

  37. destroy.all.monsters says:

    OK not to be too much of a douche but Adam Isgreen is the only real “loremaster”. Sam comes across as an ok guy but there’s so much wrong about this game, from the outset, that there was no way this wasn’t going to be a let down.

    Also anything that means Joe Kucan’s face is grimacing at me every couple of years is, in itself, a good thing. The fact that it’s tied to a lame ersatz C&C is kind of hard to take. I’d rather have a saturday morning cartoon, a resurrection of 30s/40s serials or even a full blown movie than see the soon to be unemployed folks at EALA take another stab at it.

    Maybe some of the very amazing eastern european devs can give this thing life. I’d much rather see them try than anything out of EA proper at this point. For the record, I don’t believe that Westwood can be resurrected

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