In Order To Have A Good Time: Continuity

By John Walker on March 22nd, 2010 at 6:48 pm.

It's sliding tile rehabilitation therapy.

Today, because someone told me to, I’ve taken a look at the winner of the Student Showcase from this year’s IGF. It’s called Continuity. It’s one of those Good Ideas.

It’s a cross between a sliding tile puzzle and a platform game. If you’ve been a long-term sufferer of mediocre-to-crap adventure games, the words “sliding tile puzzle” should drive a spike made of terror directly into your heart, but fear not, it’s not that way at all. Instead you must find variant ways the small scenes can be perfectly aligned (from one of four sides) to others, thus allowing your little stick man to move from one to the next. In pursuit of keys.

My only criticism here is the time it takes to get going. The concept isn’t perhaps quite as complex as the learning curve might think it is. I found myself anticipating challenges before the game thought I was ready. However, get deep enough in and all those clever new ideas begin to appear. Figuring out a new method to reach a tile is very satisfying. It’s also extremely well designed, zooming in and out from tile puzzle to platform game elegantly with a hit of Space, minimal controls effectively deployed.

It’s well worth a look.

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20 Comments »

  1. HairCute says:

    Played it.

  2. M says:

    It’s alright, but I was surprised it won the showcase. The gameplay mechanic gets painful after a few levels, partly because the tiles are so big. Running between them means the sliding-tile-bits are sufficiently long enough between for me to forget what I’m doing.

    Also I r dumb.

  3. Jeremy says:

    I really enjoyed this when you guys first posted about it awhile ago, I agree that it does take a bit to ramp up in terms of difficulty, but I almost needed that time to rearrange my head to think differently for the harder levels.

  4. Wulf says:

    Haaa, I remember playing this a while back, I quite enjoyed it too. Not entirely my sort of thing but the game was unquestionably a quality thing.

  5. Bhazor says:

    2009/12/02/retconquistador-of-your-heart-continuity/

    Bless ye for tryin’ though.

  6. Jeremy says:

    I also have to mention that I really loved how the music mixed itself between the two viewpoints. Techno over ambient as you zoom in and out, I liked that quite a lot.

  7. Feste says:

    I played it a little while back, and had problem because moves that should have been possible weren’t. The idea seemed great, but some of the execution was a little poor. I only spent 10 minutes with it though, so I could be being stupid.

    • Lilliput King says:

      Thought this at first too. If you were having the issue I was having, the tiles have to completely match on the side which you’re trying to travel through.

    • HarbourMaster says:

      One of the main rules that seemed counterintuitive initially until I’d reprogrammed my brain with fresh Cylon code was the shapes on adjacent tiles had to match up perfectly, otherwise you were not able to pass through. Maybe that’s what was messing with you?

    • Feste says:

      That sounds exactly like it. The problem was that I don’t think that it was mentioned anywhere in the tutorial levels, and it’s the sort of subtlety that’s quite important. Ah well, maybe I’ll give it another try.

  8. Tinus says:

    Good, clean, simple design, but I still really loathe sliding-tile puzzles.

  9. Lambchops says:

    I remember playing this a while back and enjoying it.

  10. walaspi says:

    Very good – thanks. I normally dislike tile-sliding too but this is fine – only have to actually align a couple at a time.

    The little guy has ‘pushing’ frame of animation when up against a wall: I kept expecting a level to introduce blocks to manipulate and push between screens. (hmm, blocks with further littler guys inside…)

  11. Jugglenaut says:

    I’m glad enough people have mentioned how this is a repost so I don’t have to mention it myself. :)

    Good game, but the not engaging enough to make me want to finish it.

  12. tAgore says:

    oof.. that last level was a little tricky: it took me a good 10 or 15 minutes to figure out how to get that last key. Otherwise I found it a little too easy, although some of the puzzle ideas were quite elegant. Overall I enjoyed it though. The audiovisual presentation definitely helped keep my interest while the game was still going through the ridiculously easy initial levels.

  13. Alexx Kay says:

    Is there some way to jump higher? I seem to have accomplished it accidentally once or twice, but I don’t know how, and I think I need to to beat the level I’m on…

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