The Sims 3: Fast Lane Stuff Video

By Quintin Smith on September 9th, 2010 at 7:59 pm.

XXX

That’s got to be one of the more opaque headlines I’ve written in my life. Look at it! It’s just a collection of words, strung together like clothes on a washing line. Man, this job*.

So the Stuff packs are little chunks of DLC for The Sims 3 that retail at some £7.50 each. The first, High-End Loft, added a catalogue of sleek, expensive designer belongings to the game. The second, Fast Lane, comes out tomorrow (or, two days ago if you live in North America) and adds both cars and belongings for “four different fast-lane lifestyles: racing, intrigue, rockabilly, and classic luxury”. At last! A game that lets me accurately recreate my intriguing rockabilly lifestyle. Launch video after the jump.

*Is awesome!

Statistically speaking, RPS has gotta have a load of serious The Sims fans in its readership. Are you still playing The Sims 3? If so, why? That’s not, like, an accusation. You guys should speak out!

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36 Comments »

  1. bildo says:

    I liked the Sims 3. However, there are more interesting games out now-a-days. Right now I’m too busy with Minecraft, Starcraft, WoW and TF2. Sadly, I don’t get to play them as much I’d like : /

    If I got fired *knock on wood* and instantly got bored of those games, I would probably pop in the Sims 3. Not only out of boredom, but also to end the lives of some pathetic Sims to make my having been fired easier to handle.

  2. disperse says:

    Will fast cars make it so it will no longer take half a day to get to and from work?

    • SheffieldSteel says:

      Did you ever play A-Train?

      If you got everything working just right in that game, your trains would leave the residential district at 8:30 am, full of happy commuters, and arrive downtown at about 4:30 that same day, ready to carry all the evening commuters home at 5pm. I never figured out whether they all worked for 30 minutes a day, or for 24 and a half hours.

  3. Archonsod says:

    I like The Sims, though I never buy the stuff packs. Besides which I’m pretty sure the Rockabilly set is the same as the one available through The Store, which I got with the freebies from World Adventures.

    As for why I’m still playing it; It’s a pretty good RPG in a somewhat surreal modern day setting. I can’t think of any other game filling that particular niche.

  4. Vague-rant says:

    I don’t own or play The Sims 3 but I had to checked the video on the off chance that the Rockability car was something out of the Flintstones. I am disappointed .

  5. Supertonic says:

    If I installed Sims 3 my computer would hit me.

  6. fallingmagpie says:

    Rocka is my third favourite kind of billy, after goat and Ray Cyrus.

  7. Kadayi says:

    I’m partial to a bit of Simming on occasion. It’s makes for a nice change of pace in between other game styles. Acting as a cleansing of the gaming palette in a way: –

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Yh6YZ6jgmw

    Plus it’s an an opportunity to indulge in my habit of designing/recreating minimalist architectural pads: -

    http://www.thesims3.com/assetDetail.html?assetId=119411

    However I’m not too fussy about the Stuff packs Vs the expansion packs. The trailer sells this as a bit more than it really is at the end of the day, namely a few funky cars and some additional clothes and hair. There’s no new game play mechanics to them. I’d say their price point is a little too high at the end of the day.

  8. Klaus says:

    I only play the Sims to kill them. Why else would anyone play?

    • Jake says:

      I once had a sim in Sims 2 that didn’t really have a house, just a collection of furniture and partial walls on a hill. I wouldn’t let him sleep or have any privacy, and he turned into a smelly alcoholic that would do nothing but cry and drink and fight with passersby. Hmm actually maybe I should get Sims 3, that was good fun.

    • Kadayi says:

      Why do people paint?

    • Klaus says:

      I was being flippant, both times. I am aware that people play for a variety of reasons, but at the end of the day it gets so tempting to stop sending them to work and destroy their lives.

    • Kadayi says:

      “but at the end of the day it gets so tempting to stop sending them to work and destroy their lives.”

      You mustn’t be afraid to dream a little bigger, darling.

    • Klaus says:

      I would say I enjoy designing the homes more than micro managing their individual lives. Especially when there are 4 Sims in one house, stress builds up and I will probably kill off two. Four people in one room where only one Sim likes the decor. >:(

      I have only led a handful of Sims to full, productive lives. So many fatalities though.

  9. Xercies says:

    i would play The Sims and then i read Alice and Kev and now that none of my games will ever coem to the brilliance of that one.

  10. Closeted casual gamer says:

    I’ve played the Sims 3 from day 1 and still do. “Hardcore” gamers have come to hate the Sims when it became the most mainstream gaming franchise ever, and don’t see it as the ambitious and unique sandbox game it is.
    Back when the original came out, it was considered a simulation game and it was cool to play it and discuss it with male friends. At least in my part of the world. That’s still the way I see it.

    I like the Sims 3 more than Civ IV and TF2 combined. THERE I SAID IT !

    • Klaus says:

      Let the stoning commence!

    • Kadayi says:

      It’s a great game for sure. A lot of the problem when it comes to male gamers is that many lack the ability to mentally deal with constructive game play. It’s a lot easier to blow something up rather than build it at the end of the day. I think for anyone harbouring ambitions of perhaps getting into game design The Sims is an essential gaming experience though, simply to take on board how it operates, as well as the depth of Sim AI. Albeit there is a simplicity to it’s appearance, there’s a surprising amount of complexity going on underneath the hood.

    • LintMan says:

      I’ve never pleayed any of The Sims series, but Impulse just had a half-off sale on The Sims 3 and all the expansions, so I decided to give it a go.

      So far, it’s been cute and imaginative and extremely well done. There’s tons of stuff to try out. But I’m a compulsive do-gooder in RPG’s, so I feel compelled to help my sims live their dreams. Which has rather quickly started making me feel like a loser for spending more time improving my sims’ life than I do my own.

    • Kadayi says:

      @LintMan

      Its natural at first to direct everything they do, but they are fairly self sufficient if left to their own devices. Let them breathe a bit and you’ll be surprised what they get upon. My only recommendation is to lower the ageing under options. The default life cycle is a little fast for my tastes.

  11. jeremypeel says:

    You’re right, we should speak out.

    The Sims 3 is as deep as Dwarf Fortress but commits that cardinal sin of being incredibly accessible. The difference between The Sims 2 and its successor is barely visible on the surface; the Sims team have just burrowed down and out in all directions until, boom, they hit emergent heaven.

    Really, we’ve probably all in the past – around the time Sims 1 expansions held the PC top sales spot for years on end – sneered something clever-clever about it being a soulless American Dream simulator (as if the devs didn’t play with that idea themselves with the department store-optimism of the music and the sodding robot house-cleaners). But honestly, anyone doubting the progress of the series should attempt the alternative lifestyles they didn’t quite manage to pull off in the original game.

    Jake said this:

    “I once had a sim in Sims 2 that didn’t really have a house, just a collection of furniture and partial walls on a hill. I wouldn’t let him sleep or have any privacy, and he turned into a smelly alcoholic that would do nothing but cry and drink and fight with passersby. Hmm actually maybe I should get Sims 3, that was good fun.”

    In Sims 3 you don’t even need the nominal walls and chairs, you can spend all your time sleeping in the park, harassing old ladies, pissing on the chairs, stealing fenceposts and hiding them in your inventory.

    You can create monstrous, properly neurotic cleptomaniac nutters, live underground, build beautiful, creative extentions to other Sims’ houses to their specific requirements for money and then when it all gets too much, go to China and be killed by traps.

    You can also create psychologically complex human beings, push them together and pull them apart, laugh at their hilariously animated mistakes and be genuinely moved by the way their ambitions and decisions affect the intricate goldfish bowl surrounding them. They’re appropriately silly enough of the time, but there’s nothing uncanny or boring about them.

    Honestly, you’ll be shocked at how often things work out like they do in our own roundworld. Just like Civ taught you why international relations are so fucked and Sim City showed you how horrific metropolises can come about with the best of intentions, The Sims helps you to understand people.

    Well, I went and got a bit passionate about it, didn’t I. Don’t even get me started on the bloody user-generated stuff sharing tools.

    • Kadayi says:

      It’s actually quite fascinating to engineer a household of disparate types and then having set the preliminaries in motion (arranging for a couple to have jobs) sit back and watch how things unfold. Invariably how you envisage things will go and how they do is often quite distinct.

    • jeremypeel says:

      Yeah. Rod Humble’s talked about how the Sims have ended up going beyond their expectations; as in, set up enough systems mimicking human behaviour and… well. Humans are quite unpredictable.

    • Kadayi says:

      @jeremypeel

      I think the step up from the fixed personalities of Sims 2 to the traits system of Sims 3 was pretty immense. The only downside I’d say is that at present there’s no opportunity for traits to change as a response to external forces over time. If they introduced some dynamism into that the game would be a lot stronger for it.

    • jeremypeel says:

      Mmmm it’s the way the traits interact more than anything, I think. And you’re right, The Sims 2 had that dynamism to a certain extent at least; leave your baby on the floor all day and all night and he won’t grow up well-adjusted.

      I do wonder if that was an element thrown out – alongside the super-fast ageing of Sims 2 – in the name of actually giving you time to do varied stuff with your sims, rather than struggling to keep them alive and sane at all times.

      I’d love to see it happen across the trait spectrum too. The impressionable teenager having their tastes molded by the best friend with the dominant personality, the new father whose children bring out the best in him… And people might learn something about themselves, if every time they attempt to create a businessman, socialite and all-round pillar of society they manage to drive their sim into mania.

    • Kadayi says:

      @jeremypeel

      Oh I don’t think the Sims 2 did it better, it’s more that a lack of dynamism with the traits means that there isn’t the opportunity for a Sim to change their ways independently of direct player involvement. If you consider Roburky’s Alice & Kev saga, it would of been nice if after his epic wander into the wilderness that Kev came back a changed man somehow, but sadly that was never going to be the case. I went out an irritable bastard and he came back one as well….

    • Kadayi says:

      @jeremypeel

      Oh I don’t think the Sims 2 did it better, it’s more that a lack of dynamism with the traits means that there isn’t the opportunity for a Sim to change their ways independently of direct player involvement. If you consider Roburky’s Alice & Kev saga, it would of been nice if after his epic wander into the wilderness that Kev came back a changed man somehow, but sadly that was never going to be the case. he went out an irritable bastard and he came back one as well….

  12. Moonracer says:

    The stuff packs are pretty much a rip off. I do buy the expansion packs and play for a while, then get bored. The main use of the Sims series for me is a safe outlet for my minor hoarding habit. Even when I’m not playing the game I often scour mod websites for custom content to download and install when I do play. It’s alot better than scouring thrift stores and clogging my house with random neat junk.

  13. Zogtee says:

    I really enjoy TS3, but this expansion or add-on is the most uninteresting one (to me) so far. Vehicles are pretty pointless in the game and the vague rockabilly theme is a solid meh.

    • Zogtee says:

      Oh yeah, I play it because I like to build things, without having the threat of imminent destruction looming over me if I take too long, like in most RTS games. Also, it’s horribly addictive and the closest thing we have to a gaming sitcom. Throw 5-6 people with clashing traits into a house and watch the chaos ensue.

  14. Dawngreeter says:

    Why can’t we get Psychobilly, though? I mean, I’m not asking for much here. It’s not Gothabilly that I’m asking for. Or Popabilly that’d require a confrontation with HorrorPops fans and haters in order to sort out what, if anything, falls under that category. And I’m certainly not asking for Hobobilly, which is what I call Deadbolt and have reasonable suspicion that I’m the only one.

    I will also not be asking for The Cramps to be included explicitly in the Psychobilly expansion. They could call it “Psychobilly with The Cramps” so both people who consider it Psychobilly and those that do not can be happy.

    I have to admit, though, that I have zero interest in The Sims.

  15. akeripper says:

    well at least you get a jump suit….

    • akeripper says:

      but no faster motorcycles just a crazy expensive F1 lookalike……and one of the new male haircuts is available in a free pack from the sims store…..but male sims are no fun any way