4000 Metres Down: Dive To The Titanic

By Jim Rossignol on January 27th, 2011 at 11:17 am.


Huh, not sure how we missed this before now. PCG points out that Excalibur – those kings of random simulation publishing – released Dive To The Titanic, or DIVE to the TITANIC, to give it the proper formatting, which is a game about piloting a deep-sea mini-sub to explore the wreck of the Titanic. The trailer (in the depths below) is ludicrously hyperbolic, and the game looks pretty full on. Vicarious claustrophobia feelings, ahoy!

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59 Comments »

  1. P7uen says:

    Is that the 1912 version of the Inception theme?

    Hyperbollocks.

  2. westyfield says:

    If the interior of the Titanic is fully modelled that would be awesome – I want to drive a robosub into the bridge and park it on the captain’s chair.

  3. Kaira- says:

    In theory, I find this rather interesting.

    In practice, I have to ask – what is the point of this game? Plot? Anything?

  4. Hides-His-Eyes says:

    Looks like it would be a fun afternoon.

  5. Churba says:

    Cripes, I hope the journey down to the bottom isn’t in real time. Welcome, to an exciting journey, where you sink slowly into the blackness of the ocean over FOUR GRIPPING HOURS.

    • reticulate says:

      BEHOLD as we simulate UNAVOIDABLE LEG CRAMPS while you further experience the CRUSHING BLACK LONELINESS, and finally the possibility that A MID ATLANTIC STORM WILL RENDER YOUR CRAFT UNABLE TO SURFACE, LEAVING YOU TO DIE as a PERMANENT REMINDER TO THE FOLLY OF MAN.

      Also I hear it gets pretty stuffy in those bathyscaphes too.

    • Shazbut says:

      It’s like Amiga Power all over again

    • Corrupt_Tiki says:

      @ Churba, haha, that would be almost as good as Space Shuttle Sim, where you can complete the trip from hangar to launch pad in REAL TIME which takes a whopping 7-8 HOURS, mind you, you WILL need ALL of that time to memorize all of the buttons (http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/30/STSCPanel.jpg)

  6. Springy says:

    Looks like Iron Helix, if Iron Helix were about going against no odds to stop nothing. And underwater.

  7. Navagon says:

    This looks like a simulating experience.

  8. Gildon says:

    I’ve always wondered… who are the people who play these games? RAISE YOUR HANDS. EXPLAIN YOURSELVES.

  9. Lars Westergren says:

    I remember an old C64 game about this…

  10. simonh says:

    You should have Tim Stone write a Lets Play of this game, so that we may all explore TITANIC double-vicariously.

  11. stahlwerk says:

    <spooky>a grave</spooky>

  12. KauhuK says:

    Titanic in five seconds?

  13. The Tupper says:

    Rather than going down to explore, they should simply play that trailer to the slumbering wreck and it would IMMEDIATELY BE STARTLED INTO SURFACING.

    Does it have to shout so much?

  14. Miked says:

    I sure hope there’s a decent cover system.

  15. Brumisator says:

    “Ladies and Gentlemen, this is your captain speaking, I have some good news…and some bad news for you…The good news is that we’re going to win 8 Oscars”

  16. Erwin_Br says:

    I never knew that deep-sea mini-sub’s have the same interface as the Starship Enterprise. Cool.

  17. Maxheadroom says:

    oops I’ll add my comment to the one somewhere above, since my pointing out this was an old c64 game has already been pointed out :)

  18. Emperor_Jimmu says:

    Can I fight James Bond with my claw hands?

  19. Piggeh says:

    It was fine when it left Belfast, and now look at it…

    • reticulate says:

      I was a bit of a Titanic fanboy in my youth, so this has me intrigued.

      Mind you, if it doesn’t have a properly-modelled rusticle displacement particle system I’m not interested.

  20. Shazbut says:

    Oh God, developers, I want a demo. How am I supposed to know what this is or how it plays? It could be the most perfect sea exploration game in history but I’ve got to try the bloody thing before I fork out £25.

  21. Olero says:

    Are there hidden icebergs involved? Would be neat to sink your mini sub right next to the Titanic by bumping into one. And while the sub is filling itself with seawater, the ignorant radio keeps playing some elevator music…

  22. VelvetFistIronGlove says:

    I’m enraptured by the possibilities of this game. No gods or kings, only crushing black oblivion.

  23. brulleks says:

    If there are skeletons down there you can loot then I’m up for it.

  24. Stephen Roberts says:

    Mix it up with some sort of psychological flashback narrative of some events on the Titanic and you’ve got yourself a totally capable thriller game*. I’m not going to knock it though, and I would recommend others refrain as well. This kind of thing is what computers are for. New games that break out of the 14 year old boy, empowerment fantasy realm should be welcomed as much as possible.

    *Spoiler: Cthulu / Alan (depends on the ending) was piloting the Iceberg.

    Oh yeah and the music kinda reminded me of Crysis / Farcry fanfares. Totally fucking stirring. I want to go and fight some rust.

  25. Vitruality says:

    They missed a trick by not getting Brian Blessed to do that trailer. “DIIIIIIIVE!”

  26. outoffeelinsobad says:

    When did Micheal Bay start doing video game trailers?

  27. neems says:

    I’m not really into ‘normal’ sims, never mind bizarre ones, but I really like the look of this.

    I’m curious though, do those things include guns, or cyanide pills or something? If something goes tits up at more than 2 miles underwater, what exactly are your options?

  28. unimural says:

    For reasons undisclosed, a friend of mine has this game. Lets just imagine it was on sale on steam, in a pack that contained all sort of nice stuff. And he instructed me to give it a go. The game’s intro was kind of silly, not entirely unlike the trailer. Something about selling your graverobbing/salvaging/exploring goodies to finance the shebang. However, with simulators, who cares. So here’s my shortish experience with the game.

    You start the first mission at the bottom of the sea. You have an external view of the sub and a cockpit view. You can control the thrust, down/up angle and rotate counter/clockwise. And you can ping.

    The first mission is to actually find the wreck, under a somewhat strict time limit, due to oxygen and batteries. Fine. The visibility is a couple of meters, I couldn’t really tell the scale of things. The sonarish ping-pulse thingy makes a different sound if you’re facing directly at the wreck. It was pretty sensitive, and I failed the first mission twice before I manage to locate the hull. We assumed there are some underwater currents, or something, which makes going in a straight line require constant adjustments.

    There is a modicum of atmosphere done right. But, at least for me, the whole thing was a hard sale to begin with, and I was quite bored already on my first run. Still, stubbornness insisted I must at least see the bloody boat. Not literally bloody, mind you.

    Anyhow, after stumbling upon the Titanic (and almost crashing into it), my next objective was to set three beacons near the ship to triangulate the position, for future dives. These beacons must be placed in predetermined positions. While slowly roaming around the bottom of the sea, you receive precise instructions like ‘to the left’ or ‘move forward’ at fairly set intervals. Whilst operating under yet another strcitish time limit. When I eventually managed to find it, the location of the beacon was indicated by a ghostly model of the beacon at the bottom of the sea. Which, due to the low visiblity at the bottom of the sea, you can only see when you’re right on top of it.

    I never managed to reach the position of the second beacon. Just as the timer was running out, I was wondering, if we had no exact positioning, how come the positioning of the beacons had to be so exact. Or if we had positioning already, why did we need to bloody triangulate the position of the wreck? Or why not just have a single marker? I have no idea how stuff like that works in real life, but I’m pretty sure it doesn’t involve ghostly markers at the bottom of the sea, or disembodied voices telling ‘go back’. Give me a positioning doohickey, or a math puzzle, or at the bloody least a copilot from whom I can ask ‘Where to now?’, instead of having to wait for the next instruction.

    Having cultivated the earlier boredom into a self-satisfied righteous anger towards stupid gamedevs, I was able to quit the game and leave the sub and it’s disembodied crew to rot with the Titanic at the bottom of the sea. At least the next crew would have to place one beacon less, right?

    So, no, in my opinion, it’s not much of a game. Mind you, I’m sure it would have been quite a bit easier to place the beacons on the second go, after having some idea how far from the hull you have to place them. But my mind just kept conjuring the types of missions the actual exploring of the hull would have entailed. Clock ticking, you are to navigate to predetermined locations to do predetermined stuff.

    Perhaps the game isn’t like that. Perhaps you’re given the ability to explore the ship freely, and given interesting vistas. I, however, lost faith.

  29. RakeShark says:

    Y’know, 10 years ago I would have completely gobbled this kinda thing up, just like I would have gobbled up Moonbase Alpha.

    What keeps it from going from “huh, interesting, I’m going to watch some youtube videos about (that subject)” to “huh, I’m going to check this out” is that it seems like a guided tour you’d seen in an issue of Maxim or something like that. Only less like Maxim, more like… I dunno… The Economist?

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