Red Eclipse, An Open Source FPS

By Jim Rossignol on March 20th, 2011 at 3:41 pm.

Zap, boom, and all those noises.
Ooh, I do like a bit of fast-paced FPS, like they don’t make anymore. And here’s v1.0 of Red Eclipse, which is an open-source project along those lines. I’ve not had a chance to take a look at it yet, but the trailer (below) shows the kind of action that I tend to get a kick out of – dudes bouncing about and running along walls, and all that jazz. The game is based on the Cube Engine, which has some games of its own going at that link.

All of which reminds me – sorry guys – that I really want to get back into Quake III…

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84 Comments »

  1. gganate says:

    Looks like a cross between Quake and Unreal. Oh how I miss the glory days of arena shooters, when every fps wasn’t a one-shot one-kill military borefest.

    • DJ Phantoon says:

      Wait, what about instagi-

      *is disintegrated by a railgun hit*

    • Navagon says:

      Yeah, I know what you mean. Maybe Bulletstorm (which I haven’t played) will help inspire publishers to invest in less predictable FPS.

      @ DJ Phantoon

      Instagib was my favourite game mode for the longest time. Well… back when I played more multiplayer that is.

    • edit says:

      I’ve tended to see increasing lethality in shooters as a part of their maturation. Both styles have their place but generally greater lethality represents greater realism and greater necessity for tactics. Depending on the game, of course, there’s nothing stopping either approach from being badly implemented.

      Don’t get me wrong, I’m pretty bored of the repetition of today’s shooter mechanics, but I don’t think the solution is to look to the past… I think the solution is to look to new kinds of interactivity for engaging first person games to explore other than shooting people in the face.

    • Premium User Badge

      Lambchops says:

      Well said Edit, there is indeed a place for both.

      Personally though, in the small space of time where I actually played multiplayer FPS games I was always more a fan of the UT style nonsense over the likes of Counterstrike. Mostly because I was rubbish at them and it was so much more fun being rubbish at the silly over the top game, plus no one would get frustrated at you for being crap. The joys of losing miserably and then just running around with the impact hammer suicidally running at people and somehow jammily killing the best guy on the map.

      Also instagib was rather chaotic, joyful fun.

    • Navagon says:

      I halfway agree. But I think it would be unwise to continue to ignore the lessons learned from yesteryear. Yes, the lethality is a good thing (as far as I’m concerned, maybe there could be different game modes or something?), but so many great ideas from yesteryear have been abandoned simply because they don’t fit in with a modern military setting.

      I’m all for doing something new and unique. But I think that the results would be better if the studio concerned first took into account all that makes both modern and classic FPS so fun.

    • Jim Rossignol says:

      “I’ve tended to see increasing lethality in shooters as a part of their maturation.”

      Not sure there was anything particularly unlethal about Quake 3.

    • Wulf says:

      Definitely intrigued by this, I might give it a go.

      And I’ve been meaning to give Quake III another run. I’ve been so starved of decent arena based shooters lately that I’ve been running back over some older games. Unreal Tournament III isn’t bad, not UT ’99 but not bad at all. I really dig the Krall, there. I’m likely going to work in some UT2k4, UT ’99, and Quake III along my run.

      Quake III I really need to revisit though, because I miss these guys.

    • kyrieee says:

      Meh, I think it’s because of “consolification”. Fast paced aim based games don’t work with a controller.

    • apa says:

      @kyrieee
      Those energy-drink hyped ADHD teenagers seem to be able to shoot me with Q3-like reflexes on Bad Company 2 on PS3. But yes, a pad controller can’t beat a mouse in FPS.

    • appropriate touching says:

      “Not sure there was anything particularly unlethal about Quake 3.”

      It requires multiple rocket launcher or railgun hits to kill an enemy, which takes longer than a machine gun burst and gives a chance of evasion. Railgun is 100 damage, but you start at 125 and can get to armour before it drops to 100.

    • bill says:

      I think I’d like a middle ground between the two. I’d also like a middle ground between the current cinematic corridor shooters and the old open pure shooters.

      I don’t think i’d say the current one-shot head-shot military shooters are an evolution, merely a trend or subsection of what shooters could be. Then again, as an almost totally single-player gamer I don’t find this kind of super-twitch high speed game to be that exciting either. (loved quake 1, hated warsow). Yet the slow movement of many single player console-inspired games isn’t very exhilarating.

      My personal zenith of single player FPS games was Jedi Knight. It had some of the first cinematic elements of FPS gaming, but not overwhelmingly. It also had the wide open levels of old-school shooters.
      For multiplayer, the only ones I ever really loved were quake1 and UT1. They were fast, but not insanely so. They were open and rewarded practice, but not inaccessible to newbies. There were some one-hit kill weapons, but they were harder and riskier to use – the less lethal weapons were more reliable. (jedi knight was good for MP, but a little too fast and random for me).

      Plus level design back then was so much more advanced than these days.

      I wish a singleplayer game would mix the level design of JK with some of the polish and cinematics of CoD/Bioshock and without the totally slow lumbering pace (yet not the hyper speed of Warsow/Q3).

    • Baines says:

      @kyrieee
      Consoles had FPS that didn’t have one-shot kills from an assault rifle, unlike modern FPS.

      There was a time, even in console FPS, where you could actually escape from someone before you died. The games could be fast paced.

      Somewhere along the way, it became the norm to have extremely high lethality in all FPS, both console and PC. Melee attacks became insta-kill, where before it took several strikes. Guns got “realistic”, with many able to spray a ton of lead within a second at the same time that the bullets themselves became high damage affairs. Games tried to counter rapid lethality with random bullet drift, but that just made things worse, as you still died in minimal hits and it was just random whether you got hit.

      “Realism”, regenerating health, and ADS are likely the biggest culprits.

      Realism means more than guns kill fast. It also means that guns spray a lot of lead, and do so both quickly and accurately. Look at the arsenal in any modern military FPS, and how fast any of those guns kill. If you don’t make those guns kill fast, then people will complain it isn’t realistic. Same if you make rockets travel slow or any “bullet” not nearly instantaneous. And all kill fast because that’s what people want.

      Regenerating health makes killing fast increasingly a requirement. No longer is nearly finishing someone enough, where you can try to hunt them before they found life or armor. No, regenerating health meant a complete reset if they got away from you for a couple of seconds. You either used a gun that killed immediately, or you were wasting your time.

      ADS, I just don’t like. Yes, firing from the hip should be less accurate than a braced and aimed shot, but the bonus for aiming down sights is just so often so badly implemented. Take CoD, where the moment you press the button, you are locked onto a target with laser-like precision. Abuses like quick-scoping were possible because of ADS snap, but it wasn’t just snipers that benefited from it when everything was so lethal. It was just snipers that made the most popular YouTube videos, and annoying people because it was “wrong” to use a sniper rifle like a close range quick draw expert.

      Hrm, I’ll throw in Perks as not helping matters, either. After all, many perks boil down to helping get kills faster, in games that are already built around fast kills.

  2. Lusit says:

    You can play Quake III if you want, it’s still very active. I play it at work.

    Or you could play Quake Live.

    • Jim Rossignol says:

      Yeah, Quake Live has disappointed me a bit. I am too much in love with the OSP/Rocket Arena era Q3. I’ve not found much of a CTF scene still existent for Q3, which is what i was always interested in.

    • Eclipse says:

      Quake 3 + Excessive Plus is the way to go: http://www.excessiveplus.net/

    • patricij says:

      Rocket Arena was rad… and True Combat (which lives on as Wolf: ET mod), but the people changed and it is not the same any more

    • sidhellfire says:

      True, Quake was best competition game ever. There were gamemodes for everyone. I liked fast-paced ProMode, others loved Rocket Arena, and weird ones ran like crazy on twisted Defrag levels. We could gather on so-extinct internet café and play till dawn, and then go to school. Like a BOSS.
      Surprisingly, despite a huge amount of mods, each of them had huge players scene, and everyone knew about their existence. Right now, almost every player, has no intention of getting anything but the vanilla game for a 2hour spin with random dudes, who insult you just to be noticed. That’s right! When someone was insulting enemy in game, he really meant it. Literately. Nobody wrote “pwnd u asshoe” cause it looked cool’n'fun, or writer was a moron who can’t spell anyting. It was because it was seconds away to let that fucker respawn and grab powerups.
      Yeah, those were times.

    • BAReFOOt says:

      I still play Q3A CPMA (Challenge Pro Mode Arena [includes OSP and Rocket Arena]) to warm up for other shooters. That’s where I get my reflexes from that make others call me a cheater since “You can’t possibly have that quick reactions, fuckin’ cheater! You didn’t even see me!!” (I saw him a second earlier exiting somewhere, and predicted where and when he’d enter. :)

      Also Defrag still is a mod that truly deserves the title EPIC (as in “… WIN”). (CeTuS!! Shaolin Productions!!!)

      Oh how I miss exercising with my old team…
      Getting from red start to blue start with closed eyes… aand back.
      Bunny-hopping with freely rotatable viewing direction. (FFFFFUUUUU…)
      45, 90, 135 and 180 degrees rotation insta-kills.
      Double rocked-jumps (I was horrible at those. ;).
      Oh, and totally pointless skateboarding! (That bug where you could glide.) lol.
      We had whole training maps solely built for our exercises. It was glorious!

    • mojo says:

      cpma ftw

  3. meklu says:

    Looks real nice.

  4. BrendanJB says:

    Ugh, the CUBE engine. That brings back terrible, terrible memories.

    The game looks fun enough. Hopefully they’ve altered the movement and physics enough to make it as little like the base engine as possible.

    I really like the look of the wall running and humungo-leap.

    • TheAncientGoat says:

      What’s wrong with the Cube engine? Btw, RedEclipse is Cube2

    • Gonefornow says:

      I’m willing to bet that the games are mostly the problem, not the engine.
      There is nothing wrong in clunky Doom esque gameplay (Doom ain’t cluncky, just clarifying), but they could do so much more.

      Especially compared to the graphics and level creation tools, the gameplay pales considerably.

      I seem to recall some maps being genuinely impressive in design and abtitious in size. Huge even.
      I haven’t tried it in a few years though. That might have worked my brain a bit.
      Time to try again then.

    • TheAncientGoat says:

      Well, yeah, there aren’t really any games made with the engine worth mentioning at the moment other than Sauerbraten and RedEclipse, well, I guess you can add Platinum Arts Sandbox (which is kind of a kids game) and Marble Madness and Syntensity (which isn’t a game either, but a bunch of games).. But yeah, Sauerbraten and RedEclipse are definitely the main ones

    • BAReFOOt says:

      Wasn’t CUBE the predecessor of Sauerbraten. Which itself still had pretty bad graphics and a pretty inflexible engine? (Oh and so 100%-freakin’-hackable that… well… actually there were no limits on what anyone could do in the game, other than because he agreed to play by the rules. Which was completely optional, if you knew any C++ coding. There was no authority on what was considered inside the game rules. Nobody was the server.)

    • Dervish says:

      BAReFOOt, that makes it sound like an FPS version of Calvinball. Which is awesome.

      And if it’s not really like that at all, someone should make an online game that is.

    • adrix89 says:

      BAReFOOt , Red Eclipse like Saurbraten is based on Cube2
      The only project based on Cube 1 is Assault Cube

  5. Premium User Badge

    kregg says:

    It looks a bit like Nexuiz, but improved.
    W/E, I can play both :)

    EDIT: For those of you who don’t know Nexuiz, but would like to know: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=me3KeOj4MHY

    It’s a good UT clone :D

    • Wulf says:

      I’ll always remember Nexuiz fondly for having really fun gameplay and giving me a few interesting, off the beaten track player models to run around as. It was all incredibly polished as I recall, too. Great stuff. Shame that part of the team kind of sold out/betrayed the community and decided to go to work on a console-only commercial version of the game. At least, that was the status of things the last time I checked.

    • 357SIG says:

      @Wulf The other part of that dev team went on to make Xonotic, which unfortunately doesn’t seem to have many players. It’s a shame too because I really like the gameplay style, it’s different but quite fun. I like the new direction of it.

      I was actually surprised to see a post about this but not about Xonotic!

    • Teddy Leach says:

      Actually, it seems like Nexuiz will be coming out on XBLA, PSN, and Steam, so that’s good news.

    • Premium User Badge

      kregg says:

      Wow, that is sad. I had no idea what happened to Nexuiz.

      I would like to try out Xonotic some time in the future when I don’t have to stress about exams. It’s also a shame that the guy leading Nexuiz did that to the community.

      I feel sad now :(

    • Wulf says:

      @Teddy Leach

      Ah, they changed that, then. When this was originally announced it was XBLA only, which is why this was quite the stab. Still, I really can’t appreciate this when even some of the other developers didn’t agree. It seems more like a coup than anything else. So I won’t be buying it even if it does show up on Steam.

      I will, however, give Xonotic a look. I didn’t know about the Xonotic fork, but then my information about Nexuiz is clearly woefully outdated!

  6. D3xter says:

    I want me some Quake 2/3 Engine games back :/ Never particularly liked the Original very much, but Jedi Knight II was (and still is) my fav. Online Shooter… amongst others I like a lot like Soldier of Fortune, Sin, Kingpin, Voyager: Elite Force, RtCW/Enemy Territory… even Half Life and the early Call of Duties.
    Their little quirks, strafing, wall-gliding capabilities and similar made some of these games great and fun.
    Everything nowadays seems to be built for slow semi-realistic desert combat.

    • thinsoldier says:

      Soldier of fortune had the most satisfying guns ever.

    • MattM says:

      I played Soldier of Fortune 2 and the first thing I did was bust out the shotgun for some limb severing action. Man was I disappointed. I don’t think I ever got around to beating the first level after that.

    • Premium User Badge

      Malibu Stacey says:

      D3xter, Team Fortress 2 would like a word with you it seems.

    • Premium User Badge

      Henke says:

      Speaking of Quake 2 engine games: don’t forget about Anachronox either! :)

  7. Akselmo says:

    I’ve been playing this now alot and this game kicks a**!

  8. Premium User Badge

    Schaulustiger says:

    Quake 3 is still the pinnacle of fast-paced men-shooting and it will probably always be. But you know what? I’m fine with it. It runs on modern computers, it looks amazing even after all these years and the gameplay feels better than any modern FPS.
    I’m still playing it against my friends and have a blast, every match is a gracefully orchestrated ballet of death and more exciting to watch than a Medal of Counter-Duty-Strike snorefest.

    • thinsoldier says:

      The art direction of quake 3 has a lot to do with its staying power. It would be a wast of time trying to make a proper quake 3 sequel if they couldn’t bring together the right people to do the next level of that same kind of art/sound/models/textures/animated shaders/level design etc.. All the post processing effects, bloom, and ambient occlusion technology would be meaningless without the original artists.

  9. DOLBYdigital says:

    I highly HIGHLY suggest Warsow for anyone who really likes fast games like Quake 3. Warsow is probably one of my favorite Mods and easily one of my favorite fast paced FPS. Keep in mind that it will take you a couple hours to get used to the very fast movement but practice makes perfect. Before you know it you will be bouncing around like a maniac. When I first played I would just use basic FPS movements and work on shooting everyone who was flying around. Then slowly I learned how to fly around but I’m still not that great at it compared to some people who are amazing.

    http://www.warsow.net/ (windows, osx and linux!)

    Back to this video, it looks good (liked the music) and I will check it out. Thanks for the info!

  10. Premium User Badge

    Aluschaaf says:

    Just to say it one more time:
    Sauerbraten is one of the best games built with the CUBE2 Engine. It’s fast-paced and quite shiny, but it seems to be pretty unknown outside of Germany, so do check it out ;).

    • DOLBYdigital says:

      Cool thanks for the info, I really like the outdoor environments! I’ll have to check it out :)

  11. DOLBYdigital says:

    Just to plug this other game more since I’ve always wanted to but didn’t know where to bring it up. Warsow just got updated to .61 too :)

    Movement School (important for newbies)
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sop4AJ4kW6g (lesson 0)
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Y6t07VID4w (lesson 1)

    Crazy advanced movements:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O776iJ_mdSM

    Pinnacle of twitch gaming in my opinion :)

    • Jim Rossignol says:

      Yeah, I’ve played a bunch of Warsow and posted about it a few time. It’s good – great even – but still not quite right for me.

    • PUKED says:

      I hear you, I love me some Warsow. I mean it’s basically Quake 3, but the air control, wall jumping and more manic pace make it a lot more fun for me, and I like the choice of just having a dash button instead of Quake’s crazy strafe and circle jumping shenanigans.

      There’s usually some pretty decent play on the weekly KOTH games too: http://www.justin.tv/tastyspleentv/videos

    • MD says:

      You’ll find a VOD of yesterday’s Australian (+ NZ + Japanese) duel cup on that tastyspleen link, too. First successful Australian Warsow competition in years! It’s a tiny community, but it’s always good to see people pull together and make something like that work.

      Also, tips for new players!

      1. If you have a Quake background: give it some time! Because of what you’re used to and perhaps expecting, it might feel like ‘Quake 3 (or CPMA) but a bit wrong’ at first. Warsow’s not to everyone’s taste, of course, but there’s a decent chance you’ll fall in love with it if you take it on its own merits and let it grow on you.

      2. If you don’t have a Quake background: give it some time, and spend a few minutes learning the basics! Once you start to get the hang of the movement, the fun factor will increase tenfold. It’s actually a lot easier than you might think to go from complete newbie to newish player with a decent grasp of the basics. Also, if you’re playing an item-based gametype, learn the item spawn times and locations. But if you’re new to Quakelikes, you’ll probably have more fun starting with CA or DA or Instagib.

      edit: just to nitpick the reply above mine, the dash button removes the need for circlejumping, but strafejumping is still entirely present, and necessary if you want to move well. (They’ve struck a pretty good balance, though — you can still get some speed up just by holding jump + forward, but more skilful movement is definitely rewarded.)

    • kyrieee says:

      If you knew how much time I spent on my circle jump :P
      Orange 2 bonus, you better believe it!

  12. TheAncientGoat says:

    Awesome to see you guys cover some Open Source games!

    There’s a lot out there, I write an article every now and then for the (only?) open source gaming blog along with a couple of more dedicated contributors, and there are a couple of really promising open source games coming along, such as an open source dungeon keeper and an open source re-implementation of the Morrowind engine, which will support multiplayer and things once it’s out.

    But yeah, don’t want to link to anything because it might seem more spammy than this already is :P

    • Premium User Badge

      Diziet Sma says:

      Then let me:

      http://freegamer.blogspot.com/

    • TheAncientGoat says:

      Spamming by apologetic / refferential proxy! We might just be on to the next big thing!

    • Megagun says:

      Related:
      http://planet.freegamedev.net/
      (aggregation of various FOSS gamedev project blogs)

      EDIT: Seems like I got my account marked as a spammer (probably because I embed about 1 link per reply in my comments, heh).. I can’t be bothered finding out how to unmark it, and I can’t find anymore *where* to get my account restored in its’ full glory. So here’s the post I was meant to initially post as a reply to this thread. My apologies.

      ——-

      @Malibu Stacey: well, yes. And no. First of all, the various Quakes are still played by many people, with a lot of them probably using open-sourced clients. I don’t know for certain, but I don’t think there’s a lot of cheating going on there..
      The bigger thing at hand, though, is that this isn’t ye olde triple A title. This is a little game, with only a few players. Most people who play know the others quite well, and thus it starts to get noticed when you’re just playing a tad too well. As such, you might get away with getting the source, adding in cheats, and then playing using them. However, it won’t take long for you to get banned off of all servers. Unlike what would happen if you cheat on a title which gets played a lot; there’s enough servers around to cheat on and get banned from.. :)
      Also, ‘security through obscurity’ is never a good solution at all, and over-worked Software Engineers might sometimes use the “but no-one will EVER notice that we’re sending authentication over the interwebs as plain-text!” excuse to commit their insecure code. Stuff like that won’t work as easily in an open-source game, as other people will eventually find out and submit a patch, or moan about it. :)
      Red Eclipse is built upon Sauerbraten, which has a pretty neat admin system. In Sauerbraten, you ask Eihrul (one of the Sauerbraten developers) for an auth key. This auth key (if you manage to obtain one, which usually means that you’ll have to be someone respected by the community) can be used to gain admin access on most of the public Sauerbraten servers. The effect of this is that there are often people with admin powers playing on servers, and cheaters get noticed.

      Regarding the forking: That’s the beauty of Open-Source! Have a cool idea, but don’t have the time or resources to do 90% of the work required to build your idea from scratch? Fork an existing project, for free! This also helps with building yourself a portfolio, and I have the feeling that many employers would appreciate forking an existing codebase, editing it so that it does what you want. Creating from scratch can often be quite easy (yet hard to get bug-free and polished), whereas modifying an existing system can be quite a daunting task.

    • Premium User Badge

      phlebas says:

      This may be a stupid question, but is an open source game more susceptible to cheating? Obviously closed source games can be reverse-engineered for x-ray vision and so on, but it seems as though it would be rather easier with access to the source.

    • pepper says:

      @phlebas, depends, remember, there will also be more people looking for bugs and solving them, and the programmers that spot cheats in-game can also contribute fixes towards that. Where as most modern online shooters hardly get patched against cheaters nowadays.

      Anybody remember the little battlefield 1942 1.6.something patch? A patch soley made by a hint from a community member.. havent seen that in a while.

      In short, it has advantages and disadvantages, but the most important thing it does for the games is usually extends its lifetime.

      Also note that most ID engines have been opensourced, not quite sure how rampant cheating is in those though.

    • Premium User Badge

      Malibu Stacey says:

      So what you’re saying pepper is rather than having to scan for memory addresses & write DLL hooks to try & manipulate the closed source game engine for nefarious purposes, one simply downloads the source, makes modifications & recompiles? That sounds pretty fun in online games, where do I sign up?

      iD engines have the source released under GPL quite some time after it’s been made obsolete by the next iteration. Not quite the same thing as having it available while games using the engine are at the peak of their popularity.

      Also lets see how long it lasts before it gets forked by people who want something different to the core developers vision.

    • Megagun says:

      @Malibu Stacey: well, yes. And no. First of all, the various Quakes are still played by many people, with a lot of them probably using open-sourced clients. I don’t know for certain, but I don’t think there’s a lot of cheating going on there..
      The bigger thing at hand, though, is that this isn’t ye olde triple A title. This is a little game, with only a few players. Most people who play know the others quite well, and thus it starts to get noticed when you’re just playing a tad too well. As such, you might get away with getting the source, adding in cheats, and then playing using them. However, it won’t take long for you to get banned off of all servers. Unlike what would happen if you cheat on a title which gets played a lot; there’s enough servers around to cheat on and get banned from.. :)
      Also, ‘security through obscurity’ is never a good solution at all, and over-worked Software Engineers might sometimes use the “but no-one will EVER notice that we’re sending authentication over the interwebs as plain-text!” excuse to commit their insecure code. Stuff like that won’t work as easily in an open-source game, as other people will eventually find out and submit a patch, or moan about it. :)
      Red Eclipse is built upon Sauerbraten, which has a pretty neat admin system. In Sauerbraten, you ask Eihrul (one of the Sauerbraten developers) for an auth key. This auth key (if you manage to obtain one, which usually means that you’ll have to be someone respected by the community) can be used to gain admin access on most of the public Sauerbraten servers. The effect of this is that there are often people with admin powers playing on servers, and cheaters get noticed.

      Regarding the forking: That’s the beauty of Open-Source! Have a cool idea, but don’t have the time or resources to do 90% of the work required to build your idea from scratch? Fork an existing project, for free! This also helps with building yourself a portfolio, and I have the feeling that many employers would appreciate forking an existing codebase, editing it so that it does what you want. Creating from scratch can often be quite easy (yet hard to get bug-free and polished), whereas modifying an existing system can be quite a daunting task.

    • Megagun says:

      @Malibu Stacey: well, yes. And no. First of all, the various Quakes are still played by many people, with a lot of them probably using open-sourced clients. I don’t know for certain, but I don’t think there’s a lot of cheating going on there..
      The bigger thing at hand, though, is that this isn’t ye olde triple A title. This is a little game, with only a few players. Most people who play know the others quite well, and thus it starts to get noticed when you’re just playing a tad too well. As such, you might get away with getting the source, adding in cheats, and then playing using them. However, it won’t take long for you to get banned off of all servers. Unlike what would happen if you cheat on a title which gets played a lot; there’s enough servers around to cheat on and get banned from.. :)
      Also, ‘security through obscurity’ is never a good solution at all, and over-worked Software Engineers might sometimes use the “but no-one will EVER notice that we’re sending authentication over the interwebs as plain-text!” excuse to commit their insecure code. Stuff like that won’t work as easily in an open-source game, as other people will eventually find out and submit a patch, or moan about it. :)
      Red Eclipse is built upon Sauerbraten, which has a pretty neat admin system. In Sauerbraten, you ask Eihrul (one of the Sauerbraten developers) for an auth key. This auth key (if you manage to obtain one, which usually means that you’ll have to be someone respected by the community) can be used to gain admin access on most of the public Sauerbraten servers. The effect of this is that there are often people with admin powers playing on servers, and cheaters get noticed.

      Regarding the forking: That’s the beauty of Open-Source! Have a cool idea, but don’t have the time or resources to do 90% of the work required to build your idea from scratch? Fork an existing project, for free! This also helps with building yourself a portfolio, and I have the feeling that many employers would appreciate forking an existing codebase, editing it so that it does what you want. Creating from scratch can often be quite easy (yet hard to get bug-free and polished), whereas modifying an existing system can be quite a daunting task.

    • Megagun says:

      @Malibu Stacey: well, yes. And no. First of all, the various Quakes are still played by many people, with a lot of them probably using open-sourced clients. I don’t know for certain, but I don’t think there’s a lot of cheating going on there..
      The bigger thing at hand, though, is that this isn’t ye olde triple A title. This is a little game, with only a few players. Most people who play know the others quite well, and thus it starts to get noticed when you’re just playing a tad too well. As such, you might get away with getting the source, adding in cheats, and then playing using them. However, it won’t take long for you to get banned off of all servers. Unlike what would happen if you cheat on a title which gets played a lot; there’s enough servers around to cheat on and get banned from.. :)
      Also, ‘security through obscurity’ is never a good solution at all, and over-worked Software Engineers might sometimes use the “but no-one will EVER notice that we’re sending authentication over the interwebs as plain-text!” excuse to commit their insecure code. Stuff like that won’t work as easily in an open-source game, as other people will eventually find out and submit a patch, or moan about it. :)
      Red Eclipse is built upon Sauerbraten, which has a pretty neat admin system. In Sauerbraten, you ask Eihrul (one of the Sauerbraten developers) for an auth key. This auth key (if you manage to obtain one, which usually means that you’ll have to be someone respected by the community) can be used to gain admin access on most of the public Sauerbraten servers. The effect of this is that there are often people with admin powers playing on servers, and cheaters get noticed.

      Regarding the forking: That’s the beauty of Open-Source! Have a cool idea, but don’t have the time or resources to do 90% of the work required to build your idea from scratch? Fork an existing project, for free! This also helps with building yourself a portfolio, and I have the feeling that many employers would appreciate forking an existing codebase, editing it so that it does what you want. Creating from scratch can often be quite easy (yet hard to get bug-free and polished), whereas modifying an existing system can be quite a daunting task.

      —EXTRA TEXT APPENDED TO NOT HAVE THIS BEING MARKED AS SPAM, KTHX—

    • Premium User Badge

      phlebas says:

      @pepper I suppose that makes sense if there’s one true repository for the source and canonical binaries are produced and signed at that point so they can be validated at runtime (using some mechanism in which knowing the validation method doesn’t make it easier to produce a hacked binary which will still validate) – is that how it works?

    • pepper says:

      You both have good points, validation is indeed needed in most cases, just as server admins.

      Then again, plenty of closed source have also shown high amounts of cheaters. And if people want to find a way they will anyway.

      My point about ID tech engines is that in the end its quite likely that some procedure or algorithm largely survives the engine jumps or is re-used, and thus exposed in the old GPL’ed code. Thus going through the old code shows a lot of hints about the newer engine, especially if its engineered via the same basic plan or structure.

      Anyway, arguments can be made both for and against using a opensource engine. In the end the people with malicious intent will win anyway. I enjoy dabbling in the memory addresses of games myself to see if I can do stuff in the way its not intended( singleplayer offcourse ), and the tools out there make the job a lot easier. Its also a good way to see if you can crack your own code/security.

  13. Hedgemonster says:

    I don’t think that it’s a coincidence that slower-paced, more “realistic” shooters developed as the people who originally played Quake III and Unreal Tournament–to say nothing of older titles, like the original Quake–shortly after release got older and slower themselves.

    Even though I can still do fairly okay at fast-paced shooters (e.g. Unreal Tournament 3; Team Fortress 2 possibly qualifies as well), I do realise that I’m now a little past thirty years old and either no longer possess the reflexes that I had back in the nineties, or simply no longer have the required spare time to play these games as compulsively and as often as I did back then. Possibly it’s a combination of the two factors.

    I also think that there exist some good modern games that occupy the space somewhere between twitch-based and “pseudo-realistic” shooters. I would put Bulletstorm somewhere in the middle of that particular spectrum, and also games like Singularity, with which I’ve been having quite a bit of fun lately. Neither of them are as fast-paced and ludicrous as Quake III, but neither are they as glacial as COD or Counter-Strike. They seem to strike a good balance between twitchiness on the one hand, and a more thoughtful, tactical approach on the other.

  14. Valvarexart says:

    Plays pretty nicely

  15. Metonymy says:

    “Alien arena” is another freeware in the style of Quake3. It’s been around a while and looks just as good, or better.

  16. pupsikaso says:

    My, gosh! This is exactly what I need. Playing on the same instagib UT3 server every night for 3 years in a row is now getting a bit boring.
    Thanks for the link, Jim!

  17. Azazel says:

    Looks cool, I too have a hankering for some old school Quakesque thrills…

    Part of me really wants to try Quakeworld again… don’t have the time to get sucked back into that though. Last time I played was EQL season 7 and that was when there were five divisions for me to hang around the bottom of. Looks like there’s only 3 now, though there are more teams per div.

  18. Daryl says:

    Looks interesting. I could be very nitpicky about the trailer because there are a few things I don’t like, but given that it’s free I’ll just play the damn thing and shut the hell up. I keep hoping for a proper UT2004 successor ever since the abortion that was UT3. This doesn’t look like it, but it looks like it may be a step in the right direction.

  19. syntax says:

    Ooh, good to see this went through :)

  20. LuckyStrike-Rx says:

    Hello,
    We wanted to create a “arena type” game, but with an unique gameplay, even if alot of stuff have been inspired by many arena games. There’s already a lot of opensource quake remake, or quake like physics (strafe jump, etc…).
    We wanted it more accessible for beginner, with an original movement system and weaponry. (plasma is my favorite)
    There’s also some unique mutator like jet pack and onslaught (a bit like unreal’s invasion, but monsters can be assigned to a player team).
    Another cool feature is weapon customization, you can tweak all weapon. Want a shotgun that explode in thousand lasers, or a guided giant plasma ball, it is possible (press esc>variable>weapon). You can also host your own mod on your server without forcing any download.

  21. Kdansky says:

    Needs more grey/brown. Completely unplayable with all these colours! What are they thinking!?

  22. porps says:

    sweet… love arena style games, and while quakelive does still rock my world it would be nice to have something brand new… i’ll definately be giving this a whirl

  23. 357SIG says:

    This game is growing on me pretty fast. I thought it felt off at first but it’s starting to get addictive. especially since you can COMPLETELY change the game between rounds. Their mutator and map vote system is pretty masterful in my opinion. You can go from a CPMA or Team Arena Master (if you’re into UT) mode to instagib capture the flag with jetpacks between maps, just by voting for a map/game mode with the mutators you want.

    The gameplay itself is almost a fusion of halo and unreal tournament with interesting movement twists (jetpacks/wallruns) and the ability to kick people in the face.

    Medieval(swords only) instagib survivor deathmatch is quite a bit of fun. (THERE CAN ONLY BE ONE!)

    Anyhow, that’s just my wall of text/0.02¢ on that. This is coming from a former Warsow, CPMA, Quakeworld, Quake1/2/3, Doom 2 (Skulltag sourceport) player, as well as someone who enjoys World of Tanks, ArmA 2 and other such opposites.

  24. InsidiousBoot says:

    Mix Quake with Shattered Horizon.. and perhaps some UT elements.

  25. MD says:

    I don’t think I’ll get into it any time soon, because I’m in Warsow mode at the moment, so everything else feels slightly wrong. (And if I gave it enough time to start feeling right, it’d make Warsow feel wrong.)

    But I’m actually pretty intrigued by this, and I’d like to give it a proper go at some point. I’m not sure whether the server I joined was typical or not, but the movement feels quite interesting. As far as I can tell there’s no strafe jumping or similar, which is instinctively a bit of a turnoff for me, but it still feels like the movement could have a bit of depth to it. I like what they’ve done with the double-jump, where you get full 3-dimensional control of the direction of your second jump.

    Haven’t played enough to have an opinion on the weapons. The graphics are fine, and I really appreciate the fact that the whole thing seems pretty customisable at the client-side. I haven’t played around with the console yet, but I’m glad it has one, and that at the very least FOV is customisable.

  26. InsidiousBoot says:

    I played it a bit an hour back, but its not something I’d play personally, I’ll stick with Quake Live whilst I wait for Orion Prelude.

  27. kyrieee says:

    It does look pretty intriguing.

  28. Bats says:

    Damn, that really does remind me a lot of the old Quake 2/Unreal Turney days, which I sorely miss. Will give this a whirl

  29. DeanLearner says:

    Quoting the trailer “built in editor create levels online”

    As in, lots of people editing at the same time? Sounds like a fun idea to me.

  30. squareking says:

    I liked the stylized HUD and whatnot, but this looks like Quake/UT Retread #7511. I’d like to see another Tremulous or an indie spin on Shattered Horizon.

    Or HAWKEN

  31. pupsikaso says:

    After a play-through I wish they’d had an insta-gib mod.

  32. thecat17 says:

    I, too, was missing the Quake/UT-style of manshooter.

    And this. This is what I’ve been looking for.

    I love it when I don’t know what most of the weapons in a game do upon a first playthrough. It felt like I was really actually playing something new. And the hit-boxes seem very precise. It makes me remember just how optimal the mouse+keyboard combo is.

    A couple of hours later on a server, and I saw Quinton (one of the two creators) chatting in-game. I was having so much fun that I didn’t chat, but if he was watching my killstreak he’d understand.

    The dashing is awesome. Haven’t found out how to wall-run yet, but man… do I loves the dashing.

    The player models do funny things when they get fragged sometimes. Like convulse spastically, or sometimes almost come to a complete stop but then keep falling down a flight of stairs. I call this a “feature” rather than a “bug”, it’s rather amusing!

    And now I’m off to play again!