The Return To Auraxis: Planetside 2

By Dan Grill on July 8th, 2011 at 2:01 pm.


You know of the late lamented Corporal Smith’s exploits on the Planetside. All of us here at RPS are ragged veterans of those interminable wars, serving time in the forests of Foresal and missing drops on towers in the lost deserts of Oshur. It is with great trepidation (and after a phone interview with SOE Creative Director Matt Higby) that we can now reveal details of Planetside 2…

The first thing that’s clear; they’re aiming to recreate Planetside with modern tech. From the video I just saw, I think they’ve done it.

For those not in the know; Our story begins eight years ago, on a distant planet called Auraxis. Three immortal factions contest the surface of this planet; the militaristic Terran Republic, the guerrilla New Conglomerate and the advanced Vanu Sovereignty. Their troops can’t die permanently, so contests consist of hordes of tanks, planes and infantry rolling, skimming and tramping towards each other over the same shattered world, eternally.

Being the most-varied and largest-scale MMO FPS combat of all time meant it was a game that generated war stories: as a lone anti-armour Max, running round a hillside, accidentally into the blind spot under a rare towering enemy mech and shooting its tuchas until it died of humiliation; of the mighty RPS tank platoon pounding our Escapist rivals until they realised we had no air cover and we scattered our tanks into the shelter of unsympathetic trees; of gal-dropping an ANT supply truck on a besieged base, saving it at the last moment. Every player has a dozen stories.

That was Planetside 1. Planetside 2 is going to be set in the same place, with the same continents and the same factions, as Higby explained: “It’s going to feel very similar to Planetside. We’re bringing the game up to a modern feeling, making it more quickly paced… the systems and features we’re adding are things we learned over the last eight years from the Planetside Live service and the features that MMO gamers expect, as well as all the bells and whistles of a modern FPS.” That said, there is going to be increased empire differentiation, so that the tools, techniques, strategies and tactics for each faction are going to be even more distinct.


“It’s only recently that we’ve had the technology that allowed the dream of where we need to bring Planetside in the future.” He tells us that they’ve been wanting to make the game for years, and that’s it’s evolved over a very long period. They’ve built a new homegrown engine called Forgelight designed specifically for online MMOFPSes, critically incorporating Nvidia’s Physx.

“We’re talking 2011 AAA graphics quality… We wanted to allow the AAA visual effects and physics that you see in today’s AAA FPSes – in an massively multplayer game”. He quickly runs through how physics is going to change the world: incorporating flight mechanics to make flying much more realistic; setting up large dynamic objects that can move around and be used for cover; or the way weapons affect players, so that if you get hit by a rocket that doesn’t kill you, it’ll knock you back.

As with the previous game, it’s going to feature thousands of players battling with each other in realtime on enormous maps, with no instancing – “we’re only limited by how many can physically fit into a small area.” New, however, is a territory control and conquest system; “You’ll fight over more than just facilities and bases; this turns every square inch into contestable valuable real estate that you want to control. The battlefield is always moving, you’re not fighting in the same place; something in your territory yesterday is now the newest hotspot. All of our maps are completely hand-crafted so that every square inch supports gameplay. The size of our environments is completely unrivalled.” It’s worth noting that facilities also have an effect on other parts of your military force – ammo dumps giving ammo bonuses and so on.

The more territory you control, the more resources you’ll have flowing in, whilst both attacking and defending give you a burst of resources. “There’s no resources pop-up to be smashed by assault rifle butt – how empires control territory and hence resources determines how successful they’re going to be in the game.” These are used for skill certifications, weapon upgrades, attaching new weapons to your vehicles and so on.


There’s also a new skill certification tree. “It uses an offline time-based learning method – if you’re familiar with Eve Online, how they unlock skills, it’s similar to that.” Each skill is locked to a battle-rank though – a player can’t progress past a certain point unless they actually play. “It allows players with not much time to game to keep up with friends who have nothing but free time, and it allows us to have bonuses for players who are actively playing.”

The skills tree is extensive, to say the least – Higby mentions thousands of skills. “Every vehicle will have its own skill tree, every weapon will have its own skill tree. You’ll be able to completely customise your soldier to the exact playstyle you want”. Squad leaders will retain their separate advancement tree, allowing them to command larger groups, whilst outfits will both be able to specialise further and customise their appearance. Higby envisages a purpose-built outfit for air cavalry with customised reapers and bonuses to air combat, or armour outfits so that “if you see these guys coming over a hill in customised prowlers, you’ll know who they are.”

To make ad-hoc combat easier, there’s a new customisation addition; a class system, replacing the pseudo-classes of the original. You can seamlessly switch between classes that you’ve unlocked; so you can can play as a medic or engineer, or switch to maxes and heavy assaults, depending on what your squad needs. It seems to be a way of creating a soldier that fits the individual’s play style but still feels useful and recognisable in the battle. “The FPS elements we’ve taken are for faster paced combat; we like the Battlefield games.”


Finally, most importantly, there’s a new mission system which automatically generates missions to focus players and balance populations, as well as allowing veteran players to insert their own missions. This allows players to specify in some detail what troops they need, for example a mission requiring engineers to set up minefields or repair turrets at a base. The default missions, when no player-created mission is available, focus players on nearby territory that can be conquered, or needs defending.

One large change followed on what Higby describes as Planetside’s number one lesson; “get people into the action quicker.” Because of this each factions’ sanctuaries are gone, and with them the Hart shuttle. Instead, each continent has an uncapturable foothold for each faction. To also aid with, and to tie into the missions system, players can also choose to auto-squad with nearby groups, and spawn on their squad – though this latter doesn’t work under every circumstance, to give defenders a chance, it’s one of many elements that should improve the new player experience.

Other changes we’ve picked out from the release; “seaborne combat” is an innovation and something that an FPS has never featured, especially not on Planetside’s scale. Though the setting of Auraxis hasn’t changed, the description of “open fields, tightly-packed urban centres” is also a shift from the locations we’ve seen before.

It’s rare when doing interviews that you hear relief in a voice; the sound of a tongue that’s been bitten so hard, for so long, that it’s resonates scar-tissue. “It has unrivalled scope and unrivalled scale.”, says Higby. “In a world where most games are copycats, it’s unique… It’s really, really, really hard to make an MMOFPS; an MMORPG is way easier… It’s probably more trouble than it’s worth for most people. It’s a juggernaut. We feel like we’re going to blow the roof of the MMOFPS market with this game.”

SOE wouldn’t be drawn on release dates, beta dates or pricing structures for this. It is, however PC-only, the sequel to the best MMOFPS of all time, and all of RPS is certainly going to be playing it. We’re running low on war-stories, after all.

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120 Comments »

  1. coffeetable says:

    Even though I can’t come within 50 feet of an MMO without risking acute career failure, lord is this tempting.

    • Quinnbeast says:

      Get your space-pants at the ready. Careers are over-rated!

      Next to most MMOs there’s no serious grinding to be done; you can almost treat it like a (really) massive, perpetual game of Tribes or Battlefield (2142). P1 was quite easy to dip into without feeling like you were always aiming for that next level or next bit of gear.

      Bailing out of a Galaxy dropship over an enemy held base is tremendous fun. Often, your squad is doomed from the start without some guitar-string-tight planning, but when it does work you’ll find yourself grinning ‘a massive cheeser’.

      The first time I saw a 100-man-per-side base assault from one of the little outpost towers on a ridge looking down on to the base in question… I may have pee’d juuuust a little bit.

  2. El_MUERkO says:

    Woohoo!!!

    The Halibuts will ride gay-bikes once again!!!

    FEAR THE FISH!!!

  3. Greg Wild says:

    Great gods be good, the daddy is coming home.

    Sounds superb.

  4. Lost says:

    Looking good ;) can’t wait for the coming months and more information coming out.

  5. frenz0rz says:

    Oh I am so getting in on this as soon as it comes out.

  6. Eldiran says:

    Why does everything have to be an MMO?

    • Wilson says:

      I was disappointed when I heard about the MoW guys talking about doing an MMO type thing, but this is different. Planetside was always an MMO, and one of the only ones that really ever caught my eye as well.

    • Dana says:

      Define ‘everything’.

    • DK says:

      You mean why does the sequel to the first and only true MMOFPS have to be an MMOFPS? I think the answer is obvious.

    • Dana says:

      Not first and not the only.

    • Eldiran says:

      I’m more whining about a general trend than picking on this specific game. I keep seeing these awesome games and then I find out they’re MMOs and not… things that will stick around after the company stops making money off ‘em.

      I guess I’m just bitter after reading those articles about The Secret World.

  7. CMaster says:

    In general sounds good, but I’m not too sure about a few of the mutterings. Skill systems seem to imply that those who have played for longer will have an actual combat advantage, rather than a flexibility advantage. It’s also hard to see what advantages a class system gives over the old armour/loadout system, that basically let you create custom classes and save them away. Spawning with a squad sounds like it could undermine one of the more strategically important elements of it too, in the respawn truck, whatever that was called again.

    Still, sounds promising and am keen to play it. I do kinda wish someone would make an MMOFPS that wasn’t Planetside though, could do something about the inherrent flaws that PS has.

    • Meatloaf says:

      He did say that spawning on your squad would not work in certain conditions, I imagine there’s some way for the other team to prevent it, either by destroying the spawntruck or jamming devices or something.

      Actually being able to win a battle, rout the enemy, and hunting down any stragglers was great. They weren’t going to respawn in 10 seconds right behind you. Their base is 5 minutes away.

      Also being one of those stragglers was one of the most tense and memorable experiences gaming has ever offered. Being far behind enemy lines when the enemy was actual humans, with all their awareness and lack thereof is far more interesting than the insta-gibbing NPC guards of most other MMOs.

      It was fantastic. Creeping through jungles, clambering over mountains, trying to make it back to safe territory. Even though you could go for 15 minutes or more without seeing another player during these excursions, they were amazing.

  8. Wilson says:

    Planetside was always interesting to me, though I was too young to play it when it was big. This new version, I will keep an eye on. Hopefully there will be a demo-beta so I’ll have a chance to try it out.

  9. magicwalnuts says:

    Pants jizzingly superb, notice the “fuck yeah” tag.

  10. Icarus says:

    “they’re aiming to recreate Planetside with modern tech”

    Sony in ‘actually realising what people want from an MMO’ shocker.

    No, seriously, I am actually shocked that they realised this is what folks want.

    And also incredibly pleased.

  11. Seniath says:

    More articles with the fuckyeah tag, please.
    Oh and can’t wait, obv.

  12. Dawngreeter says:

    So it’s basically Dust without the console mentality?

    I’m highly interested.

    • Meatloaf says:

      Yeah, I thought the same thing. I was really disappointed in Dust 514 being console exclusive. Between that and the whole Monocles Are Expensive debacle, CCP lost quite a bit of face recently.

  13. The Pink Ninja says:

    What I want most from this is the RPS Outfit. When we drop an prepared squad of troops onto a base from a Galaxy or flank an enemy group with an armoured spear… beautiful.

    Even with the word Team in the titles gaes like TF2 rarely have any actual teamwork or planning. To actually be able to organise and plan and carry it out and see it have an effect on a greater war effort would be heaven.

  14. Rossi says:

    Wonder what the they mean by faster pace.

    I liked the way the original Planetside (pre-expansion) managed to dynamically create front lines and pitched battles. Hope this will still happen.

    • CMaster says:

      “Wonder what the they mean by faster pace.”

      I read it as deadlier guns and a sprint key – based to an extent off them saying they wanted it to be more like modern AAA FPSes (ie CoDs)

    • The Pink Ninja says:

      Less down time, more fight time!

    • Rossi says:

      A sprint key would be handy. But defintely don’t want to see the game turn into a MMOCOD in space.

    • Crimsoneer says:

      Not having to sit around waiting for that damn HART shuttle countdown?

    • Jubaal says:

      I’m hoping it means I won’t have to shoot someone for 30 minutes to kill them. That was the main issue with the original.

    • YourMessageHere says:

      I always felt Planetside was a much better thing in principle than in practice. My time with Planetside was fairly brief, and lasted about as long as it took for me to realise that these enormous maps and hundreds of players, which on paper make for an absolutely awesome opportunity to snipe and do long-range stuff, were in fact rubbish. The rifles didn’t reward marksmanship with kills, what with the lack of locational damage and the most powerful rifle available being a one-shot-kill only on super-light armour that nearly no-one wore. Further investigation revealed that other weapons were similarly ineffectual, and that most people just used assault rifles up close – so what’s the huge world about?

      For all the size and scope, the engine was appalling, with mouse movement and thus accurate aiming incredibly grainy and feeling like I moving the view a small set distance over and over with my movements.

      On top of that, I felt like I was in the middle of a riot at a superhero cosplay event, what with the garish colours everywhere. Looks as if they may have toned that in particular down, but then again maybe not.

    • Spinefusor says:

      Its so true, i missed those front line battles

  15. aircool says:

    Anyone remember knife fighting tournaments on ‘Star Trek Rock’?

  16. Rossi says:

    I also like the idea of good flight phsyics. I would take exceptional pride in dropping my squad mates off into a battle if the transport actually took some skill to fly.

  17. Srekel says:

    Nice. I didn’t play the original game but I feel tempted by this one..

  18. Joe Duck says:

    Best tag ever!

  19. metalangel says:

    What’s the point of the huge armoured MAX suit if your face is still uncovered?

  20. Ovno says:

    OMFG!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  21. Morat says:

    RELEASE DATE!!!!!!!! please!!!

  22. radaeron says:

    The original game was undoubtedly THE best game I’ve ever played. That said, I still have my reservations about the upcoming sequel with what’s been said for some points at the Faire, but an awful lot of optimism.
    I think what most vets of the game want is just more of the same, at least when it was in its prime! A good deal of what’s been said sounds like added bonuses so I’m suitably pleased! Definitely like the idea of purpose-built outfits. I think that largely happened on it’s own in the old days anyway. Also really hoping to see a lot of the old names running about!
    INI Elite – TR – Werner ^__^

    Ninja: Also Forseral* I lived there ! XD

  23. Inigo says:

    “PSP PC”?

  24. Dave says:

    Squeeeeeeeeee!

  25. GHudston says:

    *high pitched squeal*

  26. Alexander Norris says:

    Thanks for reminding us that WAR turned out to be crap, comments on the 1% article. :(

  27. Surgeon says:

    I’ve been waiting years and years for this day, and sort of can’t quite believe that it is finally here.
    If I had a quid for every time I’ve tried getting into an MMO, sighed, quitted and then frantically Googled “PlanetSide 2″, I’d have at least £11. All I’ve wanted over the years is to try and re-experience some of those days from PS, and none of the MMO’s I’ve tried have come anywhere near.

    Some of those new features sound pretty amazing, and it feels like SOE are finally realising what a good thing they had, and are taking PS2 seriously.
    I’m now filled with trepidation, and feel like I must lower my expectations in case of a huge disappointment.

    I now couldn’t care less about DUST 514 being a PS3 exclusuiove ,but maybe, just maybe, coming to PC.
    CCP can shove their 32 player console exclusive up their exhaust port.

  28. PleasingFungus says:

    Gamers unite to celebrate the same game from eight years ago being sold to them again, but with prettier rocks and trees.

    Someday – someday, they dream – every new release will just be an old game with a new paint-job.

    What a glorious day that would be!

    • abremms says:

      when you consider that the orignal game was somehwat niche and years ahead of its time, I have no problem with it being remade now that they have better tools to make a bigger, better version available to a wider audience. 8 years ago the audience of PC gamers with the hardware and net connection (not to mention inclination) for an MMO was far far smaller, this was before WoW blew the roof off the MMO market. there are millions more potential custumers this time around.

      besides, it sounds like they are making some pretty significant improvements and overhauls. but maybe I’m just not all that jaded.

    • Jim Rossignol says:

      That sarcasm might be valid if Planetside hadn’t been so close to greatness in the first place. It was a visionary game that was deeply, fatally flawed – and those kinds of game almost never get a second chance. This one has, and that is amazing.

    • Daiv says:

      Planetside was released with a tiny marketing budget. It aimed to get a subscription fee that frankly wasn’t entirely warranted. They released paid DLC which effectively removed large chunks of the committed player base from the main game world every now and then as they battled in areas inaccessible to vanilla players. It required a high-end PC to run properly. It needed an internet connection the speed and reliability of which was frankly rare in those days. In the early days bases could be captured in any order, meaning that the game was essentially a race to find undefended bases and camp in them doing nothing for fifteen minutes while the hack timer ran down, with no combat.

      All these flaws in the otherwise fantastic game are fixable with astonishingly little effort.

    • DK says:

      Know why we celebrate when that happens? It’s because many of those old games are BETTER than the ones being released today. They have more features. They are deeper. They are more complex.

      They were reach restrained by technology, while the current games are technology without reach.

  29. abremms says:

    seaborn combat? does that mean that I can command a battleship from five miles offshore and bombard enemy bases?

    because I want to do that so very much.

    • mortimasIV says:

      No, unfortunately. The more grisly reality is this: the combat in Planetside 2 was literally birthed from the fertile womb of the sea.

    • BwenGun says:

      All I can say is that the thought of fleet engagements centred around desperately trying to find an enemy carrier and sink it before the enemy planes find and sink yours makes me all tingly with joy.

  30. tobiasgreenich says:

    Words cannot express how much I want to play this game at this moment in time. By the time I had joined the original Planetside, there was a distinct dearth of players. My war stories aren’t anywhere near as plentiful as some of the others around here!

  31. Torgen says:

    Just a point: WWII Online was the first, and is still the largest and most varied MMOFPS.

    • Valigant says:

      @Torgen

      WW2 Online was indeed the first MMOFPS. Yes, it was also the largest. That does not, in any way, make it the best. Bigger and older does not = better. The game had some good points, but it was more of a WW2 simulation than anything else. Sometimes it took 45 minutes just to get to a fight. Blah.

      I found Planetside to be much more rewarding in terms of enjoyment per hour.

  32. airtekh says:

    I missed the first Planetside by virtue of being stuck on dial-up and having a crap PC.

    I will not miss this one. Hell no.

  33. Wertymk says:

    The only thing I’m not liking about this (and didn’t like about the first one) is the uncapturable bases. Why the heck do they have to be uncapturable? Why not just let everything be capturable and just reset things when one side wins?

    • Masked Dave says:

      This is my complaint too, the fact you could never actually win Planetside is what led me to leave it. When you realise you’re fighting the exact same fight you did yesterday, that your temporary victory then was now meaningless and you have nothing to show for it… that’s crap.

  34. DOLBYdigital says:

    Sorry for the basic question but can you change what faction you play for? Or do you pick that when you first setup your character and then stick with it? Can you have multiple characters?

    These answers may not be known but since they said each faction will have ‘distinct tools, techniques and strategies’, I’m just curious if I could try out each faction or if its just live and die for one…

    • Fiatil says:

      In the original I believe it was one faction per server, but you could just hop on another server to try out the others if you were a dirty dirty traitor.

  35. MadMatty says:

    NoooooooooOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO @ the skill system from EvE… i hated that more than anything, as its basically pay-to-win, rewarding, say, whoever subscribes for an entire year, instead of those playing for countless hours :(( How can the Suit turn that into some kind of bonus?? i guess thats why he gets paid i suppose.

    I liked the skill system from PS1 just fine thx, the differences were slight between levels 1-20, and by the time you got to level 6-8, you really were playing the game for real.

    Everything else looks cool.

    • abremms says:

      it really all comes down to how the skills are balanced, but the brilliance of ECE’s skill system is that the person who only has time to play an hour every other evening can stay on even footing with someone who players 8 hours a day every day. and I’d hardly call it pay2win, even in EVE a new player can contribute in PVP inside his first week. I’d imagine an FPS where skill makes such a big difference the same be even more apparent.

      also, if they really set it up so that each vehicle or weapon has its own skill tree, then its all about specialization. a veteran who has played for years may be able to do everything, but someone who has played a few months and maxed out his assault rifle skills will be able to use his assault rifle on the same level as the veteran.

    • MadMatty says:

      Well, i like to play intensly for about a month or two, then take a few months break.
      In EvE i found myself surrounded by super wealthy n00bs with 100 times the money and ships i had, and less than half the actual playing time- seems wrong to me.
      Indeed, if the skills system is anything like in the 1´ the problem might be minor, but it still doesnt make sense to me.
      People who really love the game would be playing it a lot anyway, and i mean, if theres supposedly isnt that great an advantage (hopefully) of being high level, then everyone should be able to play with their friends anyway, instead of having to cough up subs every month to SOE to stay competitive.
      EDIT: like when you say “veteran” here, youre actually saying “most paying subscriber”.
      EDIT: Also, following SOE´s logic, how are youre friends gonna be able to comepete with you, when youre paying subs all year, and theyre not? Its just gonna be the inverse situation-
      Those not paying subs or whatever, are going to be the “little” people in the game, just like EvE- where you can contribute, but not at the level of the top PAYERS (as opposed to players), which isnt anything but a poorly disguised attempt to fill SOE´s coffers, with the money of those willing to pay their way out of a minor (or major, like in EvE) disadvantage in skills.
      Its like old men buying super fast sports cars all over again….possibly- but ill rest my judgement until the game comes out

      -seriously its like “watch my VISA move! KAAABOOM” – if you ignore the time span, you´re basically paying for levels, arent you?

    • abremms says:

      the thing with eve is that the real power is in the money, and there are lots of ways to get money, easiest way for new players to get tons of isk is to buy a PLEX and sell it on the market for ~400million isk. that has nothing to do with the skill system. in EVE you can absolutely pay to win to a certain extent, and if SOE makes the mistake of having any kind of micro-transaction of RMT system that allows players to buy an advantage, then PS2 will have the same problem, but we don’t know if that will be the case and even if it is, it has nothing at all to do with the skill system.

      I really don’t understand your argument on the skill system, it seems to be “whoever subscribes for the longest period of time wins:” that is something I addressed in my first reply, it comes down to balance and specialization vs. generalization. older toons will have time to learn a broad range of skills while new players can specialize and compete in specific areas within a relatively short period of time, much like what happens in EVE (provided you remove ISK from the equation).

      of course the person who subscribes for 12 straight months is going to have more skills than the player who subscribes for 6 out of 12 months, but that’s the case with any MMO outside of the more casual ones with level caps reachable in weeks, but even then there is progression from the level cap onward through various mechanics like equipment or reputation systems. So that argument doesn’t really hold water with me, the person who invests the time is going to reap the rewards.

      EVE’s system by itself is pretty good for giving the player a sense of progression without giving older players a huge advantage, rookie ships can’t kill battleships, but battleships can’t hit rookie ships, it was the addition of tech2 ships that really messed with that level playing field, but thats a whole different discussion. I am not at all worried about older PS2 accounts having any kind of unreasonable advantage, they will have a wider arsenal, more utility, and more options, but it won’t be anything like a traditional level based MMO where a lvl1 has less than a snowball’s chance in hell of taking on someone at the level cap. EVE’s skills don’t make the pilots invincible, just better at certain things.

    • MadMatty says:

      I disagree, i´d say the difference in skill points is quite big in EvE and a bit of a gamebreaker, longterm.
      Anyway i hope PS2 got stuff sorted, and SOE doesn´t usually seem to be doing this sort of thing.
      Its like a new mechanic, and i fail to see exactly which improvements it brings, except for lining SOE´s and ICP´s coffers.

      Buying yourself an advantage is against all that gaming stands for, for me.

  36. Eraysor says:

    Is the original still worth playing?

    • MadMatty says:

      not really- too few people around.
      Also the expansions messed up the game by quite a lot.

      but it should still be free up to level 6, so give it a go if you fancy- im sure theres still SOME fun to be had, but not like with the packed servers in its heyday.

    • Galaxy613 says:

      IMHO, it is. The servers aren’t packed, but they aren’t empty either. I do wish they made the sanctuaries smaller along with the decrease in pop. There are still some very large battles going on.

  37. dsi1 says:

    I am very worried about classes, vehicle upgrading, and spawning on teammates, hopefully they explain these and/or flat out remove them.

  38. MasterBeef says:

    Ah planetside. Many fond memories. One of the few SOE vehicles that didnt suck.
    Heres to hoping they dont fuck this up.

  39. Sardaukar says:

    The Magriders are waiting.

  40. Renk says:

    I’m really looking forward to this game. I never got a chance to play the first one because of a great lack of a decent computer and money back then, but I always wanted to. The whole concept was just amazing to me then and it hasn’t changed now =D

  41. nathanebht says:

    According to what I’ve read, PS2 skill leveling involves your rank, to a small extent what your doing in game and real world time passing. There is a 24 hour skill queue for leveling.

    • Springy says:

      I sort of assumed they just meant the cooldown for resetting skills that PlanetSide currently has, but in reverse. So you can’t de-cert and then instantly certify in something else, you need to plan ahead of time.

  42. It's not me it's you says:

    Please oh please oh please let this not be a ‘F2P’ title. I know chances are slim to none but there’s nothing I resent more than having to think about money while I play a game. I want to buy it (or pay monthly for it, whatever) and then not ever have to think about cash again. Basically, I want the purchasing decision and the gameplay decision(s) to be in separate worlds.

    I guess an EQ2 model where there’s all kinds of fucked up F2P style account options but also a plain old pay-monthly-get-all-content option would be a reasonable fallback option.

    • Masked Dave says:

      Yeah, I hate free things for making me think about all the money I’m *not* flushing down the toilet every month.

      I mean, seriously, if you have a monthly budget large enough to just put a month sub in there and forget about it I’m incredibly jealous of you. Me, my electricity bill just went up by 21% a month.

    • Jim Rossignol says:

      I hope it is f2p, that way we might get the server populations required for proper battles.

    • Malawi Frontier Guard says:

      There’s actually a Chinese F2P clone of Planetside called Mars War.

      It’s mediocre, but I thought I’d mention it. Played it for a while.

    • lunarplasma says:

      I for one hope it’s F2P.
      1. I don’t really have huge gobs of time to play, so I resent paying a standard monthly sub for anything.
      b. Like Jim said, server population is higher in F2P games generally.
      iii. Shooting at F2P peasants is fun.

  43. Masked Dave says:

    This doesn’t seem to bother most people, but the one thing they haven’t addressed from my point of view is the lack of ability to actually win.

    Sure, the war stories are good, but after a while you realise you’re fighting the exact same fight you were fighting yesterday, that however well you play, you can never actually win, what exactly am I fighting FOR? And as soon as that thought lands, the entire game instantly stops being fun.

    I loved the blog-fight because it gave the endless battle a purpose (even if they did forget to track the scores or whatever happened there) that the game content just couldn’t bring.

    Hopefully the missions they talk about might add a bit more to that sense of achievement, but I doubt it.

    • Bhazor says:

      Good point.

      I’m not sure but a Relic style score ticker (holding multiple control points causes enemy to lose points faster) could work well with a 3 month per war cycle. Especially if there was some change up each time the game restarted with rearranged bases and new buildings appearing.

    • nathanebht says:

      I hear what you saying but there are issues. Unbalanced population counts for the 3 sides. What happens during the off hours when few people are on.

      Capturing a base provides pretty good satisfaction. Losing it after the zerg focuses on another objective does get frustrating. Perhaps the resource system and mission system both will help prevent burnout. I’d think that larger and better maps should also help.

  44. Killer6 says:

    Leaves me thinking meh.

  45. Koshzor says:

    Looks like it is time to gather pals from my outfit again.

  46. squirrel says:

    Unfortunately I dont have a decent Internet connection (damn my ISP). Miss the days when I played Rainbow Six on 56K connection.

  47. Wozzle says:

    I’ve never played the first one, but because of all the amazing stories I’ve heard from it I feel like I missed out.

    Will be getting this.

  48. Aron says:

    About bloody time.

  49. Ciber says:

    I so loved PS, but somehow it stopped being fun. This should really refresh the game. :)

  50. lunarplasma says:

    I hope it’s free-to-play with premium features!

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