Extra Rations: The Baconing DLC And Sale

By Adam Smith on October 12th, 2011 at 12:55 pm.

disco til they drop

The Baconing was a load of old nonsense, which suits me just fine. I like nonsense. The first time I realised words were among my favourite things I was but a young pup reading a giant Edward Lear tome and being struck about the face by seemingly infinite invention. But Edward Lear never included any “Bad Mothas” in his work as far as I remember and The Baconing is adding one such lady by the name of Roesha as a downloadable co-op character. To the patchwork pig-flesh stew that is Deathspank’s world, Roesha brings a dose of ’70s disco blaxploitation, with a glitterball special attack and, I quote, “a nasty attitude”. To celebrate her arrival, the game and the DLC are available at a 50% discount through Steam until Wednesday the 18th. Mr Caldwell found much to like. Perhaps you will too?

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10 Comments »

  1. AndrewC says:

    I dunno – that’s riiight on the knife-edge between being playful with stereotypes and just indulging in unpleasant racial stereotypes.

    Perhaps if they’d given her Moth powers?

    • Ed123 says:

      It’s a homage to the stars of 70′s blaxploitation films. Not sure why anyone would take issue with that.

    • magnus says:

      That’ll be your internal Guardian reader, never a good voice to listen to

    • AndrewC says:

      Because the world isn’t fair, and the games world is full of white men behind, on and in front of the screen who tend to be utterly tone deaf when it comes to inequality, and incapable of seeing things from other perspectives.

      For example, the character is not called ‘Cappucino’, or ‘Foxxy Redd’, or some other homage to the 70′s movies, but ‘Roesha’ which is simply ‘black person’s name’, and hues a little to close to ‘those people and their funny names’ attitudes. These things are important.

      Plus, of course, blaxpoitation was exploitation film making, and full of deliberately nasty stereotypes, so if you are not careful balancing the ironies of your ‘homage’ you can end up with your ‘black character’ just being an amalgamation of wildly distorted stereotypes, minstrelling around for our amusement.

      ‘not sure why anyone would take issue with that’ IS the issue.

    • westyfield says:

      Indeed. Aiming to make a blaxploitation parody seems like a rasher decision to me.

    • AndrewC says:

      I’m just trying to make their character design more lean. Because phat is not good for you.

    • Ed123 says:

      Actually Mr. C, if you’d watched any of those films you’d know that plenty of “those people” were depicted with traditional names. And that the “nasty stereotypes” were mostly of palefaces. It’s a shame your white privilege has blinded you to the rich history of african-american filmmaking.

    • AndrewC says:

      Bless, but John Shaft wants to talk to you. He’s called Shaft because he’s got a big penis. Do you see?

    • Acorino says:

      Looks like Pam Grier to me.
      I dunno what you see, but I see nothing more than a homage to the blaxpoitation films of olde.
      In one film her character was called “Lisa Fortier”. Not a very special first name, is it?
      And black people have black people’s names anyway. Not that I know how much “Roesha” would be a “black” name, never heard it before.
      But how about “Sheba Shayne”? Is it as bad in your opinion? Another role Pam Grier played…

      What’s the problem again?

  2. Thirith says:

    I enjoyed the first game a lot and liked the expansion, but there was so little that was even pretending to be new – the characters, quests, dialogues mostly felt like thinly veiled cut&paste. I enjoyed other series that pretty much retread the same ground (Lego Star Wars, for instance) but I didn’t even finish the Baconing demo – not because it was bad but because I felt I’d played the exact same game twice before.

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