Experimental Gameplay In A Swimming Pool

By Jim Rossignol on December 3rd, 2011 at 9:02 am.


The Experimental Gameplay Project is breaking away from its familiar remit of quirky digital protoypes to empty a swimming pool and have five people jumping up and down at the bottom of it, connected to events on a large, projected screen. Or something like that. What? They explain: “We play most games within the confines of a teeny, tiny screen in a quiet, private setting. Not next year though. Next year we’ll ALL be playing games on the floor of an 19th century swimming pool with tons of people watching.” Huh, wuh? There’s more: “Unlike previous competitions… there is a bit of a twist: games will run on 02L > Outside Standing Level’s Unita Zero platform, an audio/visual playground made up of 5 pressure pads hooked up to a projector and audio system.” (Pictured, I guess.) There are cash prizes and chance to be displayed in a gallery in Berlin, too. More details here.

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11 Comments »

  1. goettel says:

    what is this i don’t even

  2. Burning Man says:

    I cliked on picture and saw eggs. Was that supposed to happen?

  3. Vandelay says:

    I don’t get it…

    On the tiny screen thing, I’ve always wanted to game on a cinema screen. They should do that instead.

  4. Hellraiserzlo says:

    How are we supposed to shoot men and press QTEs with our feet?

  5. michailnenkov says:

    “Unità Zero is composed of 5 walkable platforms. Such elements represent the sensitive nodes of the system, triggered by means of a simple pressure, exercised generally with feet or hands, from the visitor. The activation of the platform unleash a chain reaction on three different levels” = THERE ARE FIVE HUGE BUTTONS ON THE GROUND

    “1. local level (light feedback): represented by a pulsating, red flashlight emitted by four LED strips located under the transparent surface of the platform.” = BUTTONS LIGHT UP WHEN PRESSED
    “2. visual level (video sequencing): every platform acts as a push button: on or off. Therefore there are up to 32 possible combinations: each one is codified with a specific video, which is played back on the display system.” = VIDEOS PLAY WHEN PRESSED
    “3. auditory level (audio mix): in addition to video, each platform triggers his own audio sample. When more than one platform is triggered, each sample is mixed together and the result is a composite looping sound which is always in synch.” = SOUNDS PLAY WHEN PRESSED

    Apparently you make a “game” around those revolutionary controls and enter the contest, then profit. How is that a game I still don’t know.

  6. Unaco says:

    Not very ‘accessible’, is it? Don’t really see wheelchair users being able to play this.

  7. MadTinkerer says:

    Nice. I get this. The hardware part isn’t supposed to be for everyone: it’s purely experimental. The software part will be what everyone else can play.

  8. Somerled says:

    Oh wait, this is the thingum where you submit a game based on a theme, and this theme is looking like an idiot in front of people. And the rules encourage you to design for one player, so that’s quintuple the embarassment factor. My Give a Shit meter rose from “Don’t” to “Barely.”

  9. Hoxolotl says:

    I guess these organisors never heard of either sportgames (DDR at 32 players), or Projectorgames (bomberman record at 83 players).

    But I’ll see if I can come up with something, these kinds of games are our specialty :)

    Links:

    http://www.sportgames.info/index.php?pagina=fotos

    http://www.projectorgames.eu/node/2

    Yes it’s a shameless plug, but us indie developpers have to live (and update the projectorgames website… I know, it’s horrible).

    P.S>: I know I posted the same on their site, I was sleeping and accidentally posted there instead of here, derp.

  10. Nezuji says:

    Kudos to the Experimental Gameplay people for looking at yet another inane “interactive art” installation and asking the question, “Could someone actually design an interesting game for this setup?”

    I’m worried that “interactive art” is becoming to the 00s and 10s, what “video art” was to the 80s and 90s.

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