GoG.com Are Advertising Something.

By Craig Pearson on March 26th, 2012 at 2:30 pm.

Satire!
Remember when advertising used to just be up front about stuff? Languid shots of fields with Orson Welles waxing lyrical about the taste of peas, and then “BUY PEAS!!!” in big letters flashing for 12 minutes as the William Tell Overture played. You knew where you stood with adverts like that: to buy or not to buy (peas). But now adverts are teases, advertising that something might be happening in the future. It’s a cruel psychological trick, to make you think you could miss out. GoG.com are advertising in such a fashion right now. They released three in a series of four over the weekend, bigging up various parts of their service, attacking DRM, regional pricing, and sparse freebies on offer at other online stores. All they’ll say is a ‘”Newer, Fresher, Bigger” GOG.com lands Tuesday at 09:00 AM GMT!’

The last time GoG relaunched, they pretended the site was being shut down permanently, so at least this isn’t that. There’s more to this than just a relaunch, but there are no clues in the adverts as far as I can see. Just GoG reaffirming what they do. We already know what they do, so what could they add to the services listed below to make it more appealing?

The DRM Knight

The Regional Ripoff

Free cake!

I don’t know about you, but I sure fancy some peas.

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119 Comments »

  1. Gundato says:

    Didn’t CDProjekt/GoG say they were going to start carrying newer games a few months back?

    And it is always fun that, no matter how big GoG gets, nobody will ever forget the ad campaign of “We died. Yup”

    • Ninja Foodstuff says:

      Yeah this almost certainly teasing availability of newer games

      • Gundato says:

        Hmm. Today’s commercial seemed to reveal the “newer” games thing.

        I wonder if tomorrow is just a list of the new games (like a new publisher) or if this is the new version of the site that has been hinted at for a year or two now.

      • Ragnar says:

        New games, confirmed in 4th short.

  2. Cooper says:

    I wonder if the red tap on the back of the helmet was meant as a snarky swipe at a certain form of (albeit heavily used and generally liked) DRM from a certain company…

    • Gaytard Fondue says:

      Not at all…

    • Cooper says:

      Ok, having seen the “gamersentrance” guy in the next video, I now feel like an idiot for asking that question.

      • LTK says:

        Not to mention buying from ‘gamepause’.

      • killias2 says:

        It’s sad, as I actually love GamersGate. They really treat you well there. Every single complaint I’ve had has been answered quickly and in the best possible manner. Also, their prices are stupidly cheap (often, even cheaper than GoG), and the leveling/blue coins/etc. adds more value than you’d think. Between my IGN Prime pet and my level 4 Napoleon pet dude, I get like 20-25% off any purchase -ignoring- their sales.

        However, lots of their content is DRM-protected, and, yeah, there is regional pricing. YMMV

    • JFS says:

      You betacha.

    • HoosTrax says:

      Oh the irony…
      “Look what [Steam] have done with Steamworks,” he continued. “They’ve offered a lot of stuff and are forever linking the developers with the platform. All of their offering is free so… is there any better strategy? No. Give a lot of value.” – Marcin Iwinski – co-founder, Member of the Board and Business Development at CD Projekt Group @ GDC

      • Ninja Foodstuff says:

        I would think the dig at Steam is made in good humour, not levelled as a criticism necessarily.

      • Gundato says:

        I might be a bit slow right now, but how is that ironic?

        GoG and Steam basically take the same approach to DRM: Make it as unobtrusive as the company is willing to while offering enough marketing and benefits to make most people not care.

        The commercial to counter-Steam was the usual “We have less DRM” argument
        The commercial to counter Gamersgate was “Blue coins aren’t real games”. If memory serves, ~Americans who bought TW2 from GoG got an extra free game?
        The commercial to counter retail (Gamestop in particular) was basically mocking how most modern games only come with a disc and not much else.

        • Drinking with Skeletons says:

          I didn’t think that GoG were similar to Valve, since they explicitly avoid any DRM, not just “unobtrusive” DRM.

          • Gundato says:

            That becomes: How do you define DRM?

            Is a drm-free installer (that you can only legally obtain by confirming that you have the rights to the digital material through their website) any different than having to authenticate with Steam or Impulse (ha, like anyone uses that) or Origin before downloading a game?
            It is, because you can reinstall the GoG one whenever you want after a single simple download (I think most of the other sites need you to re-authenticate to install?). So is it any different from a lot of the older games where you just had to enter a serial and select “Full Installation”? Or, even better, some of the MS games where they would outright say “This is your serial, please don’t lose it” and let you just click next anyway?

            By the broadest definition (so probably the real one), GoG has DRM. It just has one of the least noticeable approaches (and the marketing helps. A LOT). And, in all honesty, “DRM-Free” sounds a LOT better than “The most unobtrusive DRM scheme that still ensures we make some moneys.”

            But most people don’t even know what DRM is, so they figure “If it bothers me, it is DRM”. Ironically, Steam stops being DRM for most gamers in that case (if you are already chatting with friends or online for multiplayer, does the authentication matter?)

            So yeah, Valve and GoG basically have the same business plan (make the DRM such that it will bother the fewest number of the target demographic while still providing benefits to using the service), they just target different demographics. GoG favors the singleplayer gamer, Valve favors the multiplayer. And that is probably why they are the most well-known in their respective circles (Valve in DD in general, GoG in small-scale older-game oriented DD).

          • Drinking with Skeletons says:

            Comment system ate my reply, so I’ll try again.

            Saying that GOG technically uses DRM is just favoring pedantry over user experience. I have a crummy Internet connection–a wireless 3G modem with a 5GB limit–because that’s the best I can get where I live, and Steam is far less convenient than GOG. I give them money, they give me an .exe, and I can do whatever I want with it. Y’know, like a real store. Furthermore, I can download it at work or at a public library or anyplace with decent connectivity that I have access to. With Steam, I am tied to their account and my awful connection. I guess I could lug my (crummy) laptop around and do a backup and restore, but that’s a pain in the ass, too! Throw in Steam’s mandatory updates (it ignores the option to “Never check for updates” whenever the client is loaded up or put into online mode) and mandatory updates even when installing from disc (always ~200MB), and Steam becomes even more of a headache.

          • Cooper says:

            DRM =!= No rights agreements whatsoever

            By your ‘broadest definition’ a torrent file is DRM because you need a torrent capable download client. Heck, for that matter so is a simple .rar file. Or anyone who shares something on one of those file sharing websites.

          • rampancy says:

            GOG: You pay money for a game. You download it. You can do whatever you want with it. No restrictions. No activation. No serial numbers, CD checks, or limited download allotments. No online client (except for a completely optional download manager), no user tracking, no pre-installer-installer (like GamersGate), and no online requirement except for the time you spent downloading the game and/or for any game’s online multiiplayer.

            Steam: You pay money for a game. You must download it through our mandatory download client, where regional pricing, and regional restrictions apply. You must always download and install through our servers, which may or may not be subject to network problems and service outages. You may need to input a secondary serial number or be subject to publisher-specific 3rd party DRM. You cannot do whatever you want with it. You may be tracked. You may have to activate your games online. Offline Mode may not work. Even single-player games may need a persistent Internet connection.

            So, tell me again how these two services are the same? On what planet could anyone reasonably say that GOG has “DRM”?

          • Gundato says:

            Oy Vey.

            Some people might have gotten confused:
            I am not saying Steam is DRM-Free.
            I am not saying GoG is not “DRM-Free”
            I AM saying that GoG has a very unobtrusive form (possibly the most unobtrusive form) of DRM that they refer to as “DRM-Free”.

            What I DID say is this:
            They both follow the same basic business model. Provide a form of DRM that is as unobtrusive as you are willing to go (generally based off of the target demographic) while making your customers not mind the restrictions/price you do give them by showering them with services and gifts (GoG has extras, Steam has Steam).
            This is in contrast to the people behind Starforce, Ubi, and (activation model) Securom who take the approach of “Use a strong DRM, assume the game is good enough to make people want to buy it regardless”

            Cooper:
            Not really. The difference is that you are making that agreement/being authenticated with GoG who are owned by CD Projekt who have the legal right to sell that title.

          • rampancy says:

            I’m still confused by your bewildering statements that GOG provides a DRM service, yet you say that you’re not saying that DRM isn’t “DRM-free”.

            I’ll clarify my earlier post and say that I (unlike a lot of people on the GOG forums) like Steam – I use it a lot and will continue to use it if/when they put up games that genuinely interest me. But they are at the complete opposite end of the spectrum from GOG in terms of how game companies can deal both with piracy and maximizing customer value. With all due respect, it sounds like you’re simply just making up your own definition of what DRM is and then saying that that holds true to GOG and Steam equally for all definitions of what DRM really is.

          • Gundato says:

            rampancy:
            GoG markets it as “DRM-Free”. Think of that like a label, sort of like how a lot of “X-free” products can have up to a certain % of X in them.

            But, for all intents and purposes (in this case, people who hate DRM and want an alternative): They are DRM-Free. That percentage of DRM (in this case, the pre-download authentication) isn’t bothering anyone except for those who want to be precise/have a stick up their arse (me!) and the people trying to justify piracy (certain torrent sites…). Is it completely without DRM? Nope. Is it “DRM-Free”? Yup.

            But Steam and GoG DO take similar approaches. The difference is their target demographic, and what that demographic is willing to accept.

            The GoG model targets (roughly):
            ~Americans: People who have bandwidth limits and can’t be online all day. The burden of a constant connection are an issue to them
            Older “set in their ways” gamers: The ones who refuse to update from XP, let alone try Steam
            People who got burned by Securom and Starforce: I’m one of those :p. The “DRM-Free” angle really helps

            The Steam model targets (roughly):
            Americans and people who have good internet connections: If you are online all day anyway, what do you care if Steam is running?
            Multiplayer gamers: Same deal
            Gamers who want a wide variety of new products: It will be interesting to see if GoG manages to avoid making concessions for the publishers who insist on additional DRM.

            But, in the end, they both take the same overall approach:
            Provide as unobtrusive an approach as you are willing to give, based upon your demographic: The actual Steam DRM is rather lightweight (assuming you are in the target demographic of people who are always online)
            Shower the user with benefits to make them willing to use your service: GoG has free cake (yay!). Steam has a built in chat client, web browser, lots of sales and support for DLC.
            Marketing: GoG have the monks (who are dead, if memory serves) and fun commercials (plus, you know, Freespace). Steam has new titles and Valve. Plus, a lot of new titles use Steam exclusively, giving even more market share.

          • killias2 says:

            “Is a drm-free installer (that you can only legally obtain by confirming that you have the rights to the digital material through their website) any different than having to authenticate with Steam or Impulse (ha, like anyone uses that) or Origin before downloading a game?”

            Yes. Yes it is.

            As someone said above, you’re basically half a step from calling pirated games ‘DRM-protected’ because you need a torrent to access them. You’re just making silly statements in order to confuse the issue. GoG does not use DRM. Once you have the DRM-less EXE, you can do whatever you want with it, which is more than you can say for even most pirated, cracked games.

          • DerRidda says:

            People that confuse DRM with the basic necessity of having a proof-of-purchase system make little baby Nerd-Jesus cry.

          • killias2 says:

            To take the point further, DRM isn’t about how content is distributed. That’s just not what anyone is talking about when they talk about DRM. DRM is about how content is treated post-distribution. Do you actually have free reign over a game? Or do you need to constantly prove yourself?

            DRM-free is the first. DRM is the second. Steamworks is DRM. GoG does not have DRM.

            You are incorrect.

          • Gundato says:


            Well, good to know that I can now see when people stop reading the post. That explains the whole “We are going to argue against something you never actually said” mentality in a lot of posts…

            To summarize the point that now seems to be focused on (that would be evident if you read the next paragraph killias :p): Defining DRM is hard for most people, and everyone seems to have their own definition that boils down to “what I don’t like”.

            Killias, you define yours as “post-distribution”
            What do we define as distribution? The download? If so, I think Origin and Impulse and Gamersgate now count since you don’t have to authenticate ever again (for their actual DRMs) after the download (those three just happen to include the install WITH the download, which annoys me to no end).

            But what about GoG? When you want to patch anything other than TW2, you need to redownload (which means “reauthenticate”). I haven’t really patched TW2 since some time last year (kept putting off my replay, now I am waiting for the EE), but I doubt it made you log-in to your account to download the patches.

            With all of these exceptions (“DRM-free” is basically defined as “one-time authentication to download each version of the installer, unlimited installs afterward”), things get confusing.

            That is why, the definition I go by is a broad one: The management of your rights to digital goods.

            Obviously, some things I love (GoG) and some things I like (Steam) count as DRM, but that isn’t an issue once you decouple “bad” and “DRM” and instead go with “bad” and “Ubi’s DRM” or “bad “and “Starforce” or “bad” and “Ubi’s DRM”

          • killias2 says:

            “The download? If so, I think Origin and Impulse and Gamersgate now count since you don’t have to authenticate ever again (for their actual DRMs) after the download (those three just happen to include the install WITH the download, which annoys me to no end).”

            You’re already completely wrong. You can’t do whatever you want with DRM-protected games after download. You can’t just take that folder and clone it or move it and still play your game. Well, unless you have access to some cracks. What do the cracks do? Oh yeah, they break the DRM.

            Keep in mind, not all games on GG have DRM. I can’t speak to Origin or Impulse, but I’m under the impression that all Origin games have at least a Steamworks-esque DRM. Again, this prevents you from playing the game without explicit authorization.

            “When you want to patch anything other than TW2, you need to redownload (which means “reauthenticate”).”
            Incorrect. I have patched several of my GoG games without redownloading. The exceptions are probably due less to ‘authentication’ than due to the fact that many GoG games use DosBox. They have pretty specific settings that allow the game to function on modern OSs. In any case, how often is GoG patching their old games? The exceptions I discussed above are rare ones where GoG missed some sort of pseudo-official update. It’s not like Planescape Torment has a new patch coming out once a month.
            In any case, patching still doesn’t really enter this equation. You can have a “protected” patch without having DRM for your game. For example, look up Galactic Civilizations II, by Stardock. The game was completely DRM-free, but you needed an account to get patches.

            “Obviously, some things I love (GoG) and some things I like (Steam) count as DRM, but that isn’t an issue once you decouple “bad” and “DRM” and instead go with “bad” and “Ubi’s DRM” or “bad “and “Starforce” or “bad” and “Ubi’s DRM””
            Agreed. I actually love Steam, as well as GG and GoG. However that doesn’t change what DRM is.

            Let me point out something that was central to your debate earlier: “Is a drm-free installer (that you can only legally obtain by confirming that you have the rights to the digital material through their website) any different than having to authenticate with Steam or Impulse (ha, like anyone uses that) or Origin before downloading a game?”

            This standard is insane. If having to go somewhere to buy and get something is ‘DRM,’ then fast food has DRM. The grocery storm has DRM. Hell, ALL capital-based markets are DRM. It’s almost like you’ve taken this useful concept (DRM) then expanded it until it became meaningless.

            Then you say this: “Defining DRM is hard for most people, and everyone seems to have their own definition that boils down to “what I don’t like”.”

            DRM is not hard to define. First line of the Wikipedia article: “Digital rights management (DRM) is a class of access control technologies that are used by hardware manufacturers, publishers, copyright holders and individuals with the intent to limit the use of digital content and devices after sale.”

            Let me put emphasis on something: “with the intent to limit the use of digital content and devices after sale.”"

            There you go. That’s what it means. Steamworks, Origin, Starforce, Ubi-DRM – they are all there to control the way you use the game you’ve bought AFTER you bought it. That’s the point. They don’t want you to install it too many times. They don’t want you to play it on two different computers simultaneously (or at all, if possible). They may need to check online to authenticate. They may even need to STAY online to authenticate.

            Compare this with GoG. After sale, guess what? You have an exe file. Good job. You can do whatever you want with it. You can install clones of it on every single PC in the country, and there is absolutely nothing that GoG can do about it.

            Why? Because they don’t use DRM.

          • Gundato says:

            killias: Seriously, please actually go read the post you keep quote. The whole thing, or, at the very least, a paragraph or two after your quote…

            As for the copy-paste thing: For steam that is true, but for GG and Origin (assuming neither game has additional DRM), you can actually do the same stuff you can do with an installed GoG. If the game won’t run after copy-pasting the install dir, that is the use of the registry, not the DRM.
            Helpful info: Origin seems to have two “modes”. Games like Battlefield 3 and ME3 need it to run. Games like Bad Company 2 and ME2 can be run with or without Origin.

            As for updating: I didn’t say update dosbox, I said update the game. A few releases have gotten updated versions (think there is a thread on the GoG forums listing them), and the only way to get those is to re-download (and thus, reauthenticate). You are right, it happens very rarely: But it still happens.

            And you paste the Wiki definition:
            “Digital rights management (DRM) is a class of access control technologies that are used by hardware manufacturers, publishers, copyright holders and individuals with the intent to limit the use of digital content and devices after sale.”
            Okey dokeys. Let’s ignore “intent” because that is just a load of marketing crap (I think we can both agree that if Ubi pretended they didn’t intend for their DRM to piss people off, nobody would believe them)
            That leaves us with “to limit the use of digital content and devices after sale”
            GoG limits the access to the installers (from their mirrors) through a very simple authentication. You need to download to use it, so it is limiting the use.

            Now, if you are going to say “But you can do whatever you want and they can’t stop you!” as you did, then guess what: Most DRM doesn’t exist :p. Because a simple crack is almost always all that is needed. Applying that crack is breaking the terms of use (much as is giving someone your gog installer). You say that there is an extra action involved in using a crack: There is an extra action involved in letting your friend copy that floppy.

            Sidenote: Did you honestly call GalCiv2 (great game, by the way) DRM-free (disclaimer: I mean GalCiv 2 back when it was still maintained, not its current form which basically is the same as a GoG Installer, if memory serves)? Fun fact: Elemental is DRM-free too, but even Wardell himself would call you a dumbass if you tried to play that without patching. Stardock are some of the most notorious PR-guys in the business when it comes to DRM. GoG at least can be, in good conscience, called “DRM-Free”. Stardock’s gamers bill of rights is basically founded upon the principle of “Nobody actually knows what DRM is, so if we say we don’t have it, they will like us!”

          • killias2 says:

            “Seriously, please actually go read the post you keep quote. The whole thing, or, at the very least, a paragraph or two after your quote…”
            I’ve read all of your posts and quoted half of them. Stop being an asshole.

            “Helpful info: Origin seems to have two “modes”. Games like Battlefield 3 and ME3 need it to run. Games like Bad Company 2 and ME2 can be run with or without Origin.”

            I don’t know that much about these, but, if this is true, perhaps those games lack DRM. Not all games on Steam, for example, use DRM. Steamworks is the DRM, while Steam is the storefront and distribution client. Perhaps the same is true of Origin. In any case, I’m not sure that this does anything to help your argument.

            “GoG limits the access to the installers (from their mirrors) through a very simple authentication. You need to download to use it, so it is limiting the use.”
            When you buy it, you receive the product (the exe). If you choose to wait, you can pick it up later. If you lose the original copy, you can get a second copy. None of this is DRM. With just the original exe, you can do whatever you want and install it any number of times. You wouldn’t ever have to visit GoG or even hear of the website again.

            “disclaimer: I mean GalCiv 2 back when it was still maintained, not its current form which basically is the same as a GoG Installer, if memory serves”
            To my knowledge, it was always distributed in an exe form.

            “even Wardell himself would call you a dumbass if you tried to play that without patching”
            That has nothing to do with DRM.
            In any case, if anyone is having trouble ‘decoupling ‘DRM’ and ‘bad,” it seems to be you.

            “Because a simple crack is almost always all that is needed.”
            So, let me get this straight…. DRM isn’t DRM if it can be cracked? Do you remember how I said that you were redefining the term in such an open way that it became useless? This is exactly what I’m talking about.

            Honestly, it’s at this point I realized you’re just a troll. Nobody can be this stupid.

          • Gundato says:

            Well, this will be my last reply to killiza. Going from a fun conversation to “Stop being an asshole” “you are a troll” and “you are stupid”. I’ll check back later if anyone wants to actually discuss it, but I doubt it.

            I will say this killiaz: You have repeatedly quoted when I question if Steam and GoG are the same thing. You have repeatedly said “no, they aren’t” and implied I was stupid for even DARING to suggest it. You have repeatedly ignored the next line where I agreed they are different, but then posed a few more questions to essentially say “What counts as DRM, and what doesn’t?”

            Also, GalCiv 2 was one of the games they used to push Impulse and the GooDRM (much as Sins and Elemental are games to push that weird Stardock social network interface thing that nobody but Sins and Elemental ever used). I think the policy is that a new “drm-free” download is available every few months, but considering the purpose of most of those patches…

            Beyond that, we are going in circles, and you are conveniently ignoring most of what I say and are just nitpicking things without context. I will end with this simple quiz (feel free to plug your ears now):

            I make a game. The game is marketed as “DRM Free”, but…

            A. you can “optionally” register it and download extra missions and items, but unfortunately you need to authenticate every time you play (obviously to check for new free stuff, of course. Yup…)
            B. you can “optionally” register and download blah blah blah, but you only authenticate when you register and download.
            C. you can “optionally” register and download patches that make the game work.

            Are those three DRM models REALLY DRM-free? You picked your answers? Let’s go look at what games used those models!

            A: This is Mass Effect 2 and Dragon Age (Origins and 2). The core game is “DRM-free” (it might have a traditional securom, but I don’t think it had activations).
            B: This is actually The Witcher 2 for the first month or two. Had to register (at the site that was WAY overloaded) to download the DLC items (outfits and starting gear) and extra language packs. This was true of the retail AND the GoG release, by the way. After a month or two this was removed and all DLC was included in the patches.
            C. This is the Stardock model

            Have fun taking each and every sentence out of context to make a strawman.

          • killias2 says:

            Gunt: Sorry I called you a troll if you aren’t a troll, but I’m still not convinced. I’m not sure how anyone could make the case that DRM isn’t DRM if it can be cracked, unless they were just having a laugh. Still, if that’s your sincere opinion.. I guess I’m sorry I thought you were trolling? I’m still not sure how you could’ve said this three times: “Seriously, please actually go read the post you keep quote. The whole thing, or, at the very least, a paragraph or two after your quote….” I mean, come on. I obviously read your posts.

            Let me get to the core of my argument. I think you are being willfully ignorant about what DRM is and how people define it. This isn’t as controversial as you try to make it out to be. Once you’ve downloaded or attained your software, you either have free reign over it or you don’t. There may be some “ambiguous” examples right in the middle (I’ll get back to this below), but, by and large, it’s obvious.

            GoG requires you to login to download their product after purchasing. You argue that this represents a form of DRM, even if it is “soft.”
            However, this isn’t a form of DRM at all. It’s product distribution. If DRM includes any distribution choice whereby you must purchase something and go somewhere specific to get it, then what commercial product isn’t DRM? I mean, honestly. Sit and think about this. Even ‘In Rainbows’ required a download from a specific source. Rock, Paper, Shotgun is DRM by this account because you have to come here to get the news articles.
            That doesn’t mean that this isn’t technically a restriction. Nobody disagrees with you there. It just isn’t DRM. That’s not the term we use. If it is DRM, then DRM becomes so huge and all-encompassing as to be worthless. Then.. we’ll just need another term to capture the same idea.
            I mean, it’s like we’re arguing over the color ‘Red.’ I’m saying red things are red things. You point at all the colors and say “well, that’s a color! They must all be red!”

            DRM specifically captures user restrictions on content after its been bought, paid for, and received. The whole idea is that this product is “ours” now, having bought and received it. As such, we shouldn’t face further restrictions on the utilization of said product: installer restrictions, Securom, online authentication, always-online, CD/DVD required in tray, etc. That’s what DRM is. That’s how it is consistently used by the entire gaming community, including critics, commentators, developers, publishers, and distributors.
            Sure, DRM may be a sub-element of a greater category of, say, ‘restrictions.’ Nonetheless, when we use the term DRM, we use it specifically to refer to the restrictions discussed above.
            If you don’t like it, feel free to complain about a wider range of restrictions. Bring them into the discussion. Maybe coin some new term or something. However, don’t try to redefine a term needlessly.

            Now, to the “morally ambiguous” situations discussed above. Which of your categories do I think is DRM?
            A. Well, Securom is DRM, but I’ll ignore that. If a core game is DRM free, it’s DRM free. If it’s extra content, however, requires authentication and has restrictions, then the extra content is DRM-protected.
            B. DRM free.
            C. DRM free.

            Registering to get a patch is akin to registering to buy a game. It’s not DRM. However, restrictions on the usage of the patch or the patched content IS DRM.

            Honestly, that wasn’t even very hard.

          • Lambchops says:

            If I make a RPG about DRM and use some metal music as a soundtrack d’you think the gaming world will go into definition meltdown?

            Could be entertaining . . .

          • wodin says:

            Lots of big posts and loads of words above. Must be forum warfare. Though I can’t be arsed to read it.

          • killias2 says:

            “Lots of big posts and loads of words above. Must be forum warfare. Though I can’t be arsed to read it.”

            Haha, don’t worry. It’s not really worth it.

          • TechnicalBen says:

            Just as a note… you do know Steam can deliver games separate from the service? I’ve got some AAA major releases and some indi games that all load up without Steam open, even though I bought from there.

        • Tomsik says:

          Steam prevents a lot of legally-defined “fair use”.

        • Tams80 says:

          When you start having to use quotation marks to with a term, you know something has gone wrong somewhere.

        • LintMan says:

          @Gundato – Steam is NOT unobtrusive. Try using your account on more than one computer and you will quickly discover that.

          Why have more than one computer with Steam? Perhaps you have a desktop and a notebook. Or like me, are a gamer with several children who also play games. Suddenly you discover that Steam only lets one computer be logged into it any any one time and will kick you out of a game if someone starts a DIFFERENT Steam game on a different computer. So then you have to juggle offline mode between the computers, which regularly fails to work and forces a re-login, which then causes the other computers to forget your Steam password, so you have to login again on those computers also.

          Then, let’s say you and your child want to play multiplayer in two different games on two different computers. TOO BAD, YOU CAN’T. Steam’s offline mode not only takes the Steam DRM offline, it actually blocks the GAME from playing online.

          Compare that to actual DRM-free: I download the game from GOG, and install it and never need to connect to GOG again unless I want to download another game. No “offline” mode to worry about. No constant juggling of logins between PC’s. No inability to play two different games on two different computers.

          *That* is the difference between DRM and DRM-free.

          • killias2 says:

            He’s just a troll. He’s now trying to claim that DRM isn’t DRM if it can be “cracked.” Clearly, he’s just screwing with everyone.

          • Gundato says:

            Thanks for the intelligent response Lint

            Well, I have never said Steam was unobtrusive. I said (paraphrasing) that Valve made it as unobtrusive as they are willing to, based upon their target demographic. That target demographic just happens to always be online and playing games where chatting with their friends/multiplayer is the way to go. I think RPS even acknowledged that Ubi-DRM is a lot less annoying for a multiplayer(-only) game (since it is at least SOMEWHAT justified in that you are online anyway) and mostly becomes a problem with Singleplayer.

            That being said: While that does sound (VERY) annoying, I am also not sure if that is actually allowed by the Steam terms of use. It is definitely in the grey area since it is the same household, but it is still different end users (for kids, I doubt anyone cares. For a house full of grown adults though…). But I am sure you can understand the rationale behind it (letting a friend log-in to your Steam account). Obviously that isn’t much comfort when it is causing you problems, but it sort of makes sense. And that becomes one of the tradeoffs. Valve assume that their target demographic won’t be too bothered by that, and in exchange they get a stronger DRM model.

            But, the problem is: Going by that metric (alone), most activation-model DRMs (and I think Gamersgate and Origin) stop being DRMs. Hell, just about every retail game falls into the category of DRM-free in that case. Because they don’t restrict multiple users (after the initial install). Hell, many games with autosave (regardless of whatever was duct taped to the binary) would count as DRM since they make it a bitch and a half to have multiple gamers (what with autosaves and quicksaves overwriting stuff).

            And therein lies my main point (that has largely been ignored in favor of generating strawmen through selective quoting and harassment…): There are lots of ways you can define what counts as DRM and what makes something “DRM-Free”, but you generally tend to let a few that are CLEARLY cases of being DRM slip through the cracks.

            You basically either get a VERY specific definition for DRM-free (I think, right now, we are up to “Only requires authentication to download additional content and patch the game. Also allows multiple people to play at the same time”).

            And, Occam’s Razor: What is the simpler answer? That the “DRM-Free” solution has a VERY long and complex definition, or that it is just a very mild and unobtrusive form of DRM that nobody in their right mind is bothered by?

          • datom says:

            That really isn’t Occam’s Razor. That’s nihilism. You have defined DRM in such a way (by linking distribution to rights management) that entails everything from owning a personal computer upwards. By that standard, the very existence of the game is DRM. Your points, well stated, become moot as accepting them means there are no grounds for comparison.

            You need to ask Occam the correct question: if the vast majority of those defining something as x, is it likely that my definition y, which is reductionist, has real work relevance, and is a legitimate definition?

          • killias2 says:

            At the end of the day, you are the only person here who is confused about what DRM means and what DRM-free means. DRM refers to restrictions on the usage of content you’ve bought and received. Not being able to install a game on multiple computers is clearly DRM, regardless of whether or not you think such restrictions are justified. As you yourself states, we’re not discussing the goods and bads of DRM. We’re just defining it, and Steam’s policies there are clearly DRM.

            Autosave and quicksave are not DRM. If they are handled poorly, then they can represent a -bad- design decision by the developer. However, that’s not DRM. It’s a design decision. If it’s a design decision explicitly made to restrict the use of multiplayer players, that -could- be something, but it’d be utterly toothless if you could just install the game a second time, either on the same PC or on another. Even such backdoor pseudo-DRM would depend on actual DRM to be effective.

            “You basically either get a VERY specific definition for DRM-free (I think, right now, we are up to “Only requires authentication to download additional content and patch the game. Also allows multiple people to play at the same time”).”
            DRM-free means there are no restrictions on content once paid for and received. I’m not sure why you think that’s needlessly complicated or difficult to understand, but that is the clear definition used by everyone else on the internet.

          • LintMan says:

            “I am also not sure if that is actually allowed by the Steam terms of use. It is definitely in the grey area since it is the same household, but it is still different end users (for kids, I doubt anyone cares.”

            What I am doing is completely legitimate. I contacted Steam support about this back when I first discovered the issue and they told me it is acceptable use for one household, and to use offline mode as a workaround for the single active login issue.

  3. AmateurScience says:

    Well, they were delightfully shonky.

    I wonder if this is the new ‘We sell old games but we also sell newer games too’ thing they were hinting at in that survey last year.

    • JFS says:

      I hope so. However, I do wonder whether they’ll be able to keep up “DRM-free” with new games – the DRM knight wasn’t quite fair in that regard, then again what commercial is.

    • Donkeyfumbler says:

      Fully expecting to have this thrown back in my face at 9.00 tomorrow but……………….

      ‘Of course it is’

  4. Keymonk says:

    The first one is very, very funny, the other ones feel forced and not very good. :( I’m sorry. I’m a terrible person.

    • Sheng-ji says:

      Hehe, the last one made me laugh, the first and second… not so much :)

  5. Tinus says:

    All this is leading up to the announcement that they’ve finally secured Startopia, I’m sure of it.

  6. wccrawford says:

    I’ve never been a fan of using attacks on your competitors to increase your own marketshare. This goes for politicians and retailers both.

    As much as I hate DRM, attacking companies that use it to drive sales to your own side is underhanded. They can say they’re DRM-free all the want, but the attacks on others should stop.

    • Ninja Foodstuff says:

      Am I the only one who sees this as playful, not an attack?
      Besides, don’t consumers want DRM-free software?

    • arccos says:

      For me, the problem with political attack ads is that they are intentionally inaccurate and treat the viewer/reader/listener like an idiot. I don’t see any reason why businesses can’t differentiate based on different policies and offerings.

    • Drinking with Skeletons says:

      An attack ad is perfectly valid IF:

      the difference between the parties is real
      the difference between the parties could reasonably be a point of concern for the voter/consumer

      If GOG says that they offer 100% DRM-free games, and their biggest competitor does not, in fact, do this, then why shouldn’t they be allowed to say so? They aren’t saying you can’t buy from Steam, or that Steam has nothing to offer a consumer, but for people who care about DRM this information is perfectly valid. I guess Valve can whine about being attacked, but it won’t change the fact that the ad is correct.

      Now, if GOG’s new addition allows titles with DRM to be sold, then we can complain and call them hypocrites to boot.

    • Paul says:

      Actually, it is perfectly fine to point out that other shops suck donkey balls compared to GOG, which they do.
      (I still buy a lot of games from steam/gg/etc, but only when they are super cheap. If I could get everything on gog, I would, because their model and policy is unbeatable)

    • Tams80 says:

      Companies aren’t people. You wouldn’t think it though.

      • LifeSuport says:

        Actually, you’re wrong there Tarns80 at least for US companies which are class A citizens and actually have MORE rights than “people.” As an aside, rich people, the 1% are all companies btw.

        The syndicate already happened.

        • stupid_mcgee says:

          As a dirty, filthy Yank, I can possibly provide some illumination on this. The exact terms is Corporate Personhood.

          The claim that “the 1% are are all companies” is false. The 1%, as used in the sense of the OWS crowd was actually about personal income tax. Corporations may enjoy lots of benefits and rights that individuals do, but they do not pay personal income tax. They pay a separate corporate tax/business tax. This tax is actually lower than individual income tax and bracketed to more greatly reflect business income rather than personal income.

          The 1% in America are those individuals who earn over $344,000 per year. Interestingly, 48% of USA citizens over the age of 25 earn under $15,000 per year. Recently, statistics have shown a doubling in the area of “severely poor or impoverished.” These are individuals who spend $2 or less a day for a period of at least one month. This number, as I said, has doubled from a little over 500,000 to over 1.2 million.

  7. Xardas Kane says:

    Genesis does what Nintendon’t!

  8. CheesyJelly says:

    Interesting direct attack on gamersgate there…

    • CheesyJelly says:

      How did I see that, but not the valve on the knight’s helmet…?

      • Elmar Bijlsma says:

        And then there is Gamepause. Subtle …ish.

        Come to think of it, Gamestop IS a stupid name. Your business is going to STOP me from gaming?

        • westyfield says:

          It’s probably because they should be your first stop when looking for games or something.

          • His Dudeness says:

            Most likely to be the correct as to the thinking behind the name…still not the brightest idea of a name though.

    • UnravThreads says:

      Where? The plate of coins in the second video?

      Well, it’s about regional pricing. Blue Coins have absolutely nothing to do with regional pricing. It’s a reward system that gives back X% of your purchase in credit.

      • Mana_Garmr says:

        The “GamersEntrance” t-shirt in the second vid.

        • UnravThreads says:

          Oh right. It’s been said – I’m sure – that the coins are a reference/attack on GG.

  9. Maltose says:

    Anyone else see the World in Conflict t-shirt? Whee!

  10. jezcentral says:

    Maybe they mean they will start selling Half-Life 1? :)

  11. UnravThreads says:

    Dear GoG;
    Stop with the bullshit. The third video? Can I just take a second to point out that not every game you stock has a soundtrack and/or manual?

    Plus there’s the fact that you don’t stock the majority of games, so the “Oh, you just get the game? Come here, we has cakes!” thing just doesn’t work. Because it’s bullshit.

    Yours sincerely,
    A long-time customer.

  12. brulleks says:

    In an ideal world, they’ve secured a deal to publish all recent Ubisoft games with no DRM whatsoever.

    But in this one, I suspect the actual announcement will be as underwhelming as those advertisements.

  13. chiroho says:

    I’d think that the valve on the back of the helmet coupled with the cake in the third video would definitely be references to Valve. Are they being bought by Valve?

    • westyfield says:

      Given that the valve on the helmet was being used as an attack against Steam’s DRM (see also: the GamersEntrance t-shirt in the second video, and ‘GamePause’ in the third) it seems unlikely.

  14. Maldomel says:

    All jokes aside, I’d love to get some free cake with my games.

  15. mckertis says:

    Ehh…that cake didnt look that good. Come on, guys, you could buy yourself a better treat !

    Another thing that bothers me, is that there are still people who think “fair price” and “flat price” are totally not in opposition to each other. Its either one or the other, not both.

  16. netizensmith says:

    Half Life 3 – exclusive to GOG

    • deke913 says:

      The cake is, apparently, not a lie. The pie however is a two timing whore.

  17. myaltisa says:

    Give Peas a chance!!!

  18. westyfield says:

    The GOG customer in the third video looks like Timmy from the Whitest Kids U Know. This pleases me.

  19. RegisteredUser says:

    Gay. Lame. Gog.com

    That’s what it says to me.

    I loved the idea when they started up. The ads..I’m not so crazy about.

    • Drinking with Skeletons says:

      Using gay as a pejorative invalidates your opinion.

      • kyynis says:

        Also don’t forget the ablist slur! He should have topped it off with some good old fashioned racism and we could all pretend this is 4chan.

        • Drinking with Skeletons says:

          I’m lazy, so I didn’t see any reason to go past his very first word. You are 100% correct, though.

  20. yhancik says:

    Peas are the new potatoes

  21. Lobotomist says:

    The fact that they added Treasure Adventure Game ( http://www.rockpapershotgun.com/2012/03/26/cracking-the-ribs-of-treasure-adventure-game/ )
    to their catalogue – could mean that they finally are starting much requested Indie game distribution ?

    This would be great thing.

    Also, in one of their surveys they asked if we would like to buy not so OLD games – for lower price.

    That would be cool aswell.

  22. Suilenroc says:

    The slowed down Bastion OST in the second video made me feel uncomfortable. http://youtu.be/1QaGGSiA3yI

  23. Jimmy says:

    When I fancy a DRM-free good old game from the nineties with a cup of tea and some biscuits, I know of no better place than my favourite torrent site. Or if it’s an eighties Atari ST or C64 game, an abandonware fan site.

    • Paul says:

      Well aren’t you a unique asshole.

      • Jimmy says:

        Hello internetman. So you would wait for IK+ or Creatures (platform) to come out on GOG before getting it from an emulator site? I laugh out loud and sneer in your general direction.

  24. LTK says:

    Okay, was I the only one who noticed the sound effects and music from Bastion in every video?

    …Wait, Bastion is coming to GOG?

  25. MichaelPalin says:

    Maybe this is their way of announcing that they are actually shutting down this time.

  26. Pemptus says:

    Ugh, please use someone who can do a proper accent. The Polish accent is painful.

    • Acorino says:

      The wonky English added to the charme for me.
      Also, CD Projekt acting out their own advertisements, of course. :)

  27. PPOY52 says:

    I like how there is a valve on the DRM knights helmet. Hint to Valve for their extensive use of DRM with steam?

    • Hedenius says:

      That is a little far fetched don’t you think? As a matter of fact, not many people know that knight helmets actually had a valve back in the days. Since the knight would perspirate heavily during a fight and due to the metal conducting heat from the sun, sometimes the sweat would evaporate and steam would rise to the helmet. By turning the valve the knight would release the steam so that he could continue to kill the dragon and save the princess.

  28. Kaira- says:

    Yet again GOG reigns supreme.

  29. Hedenius says:

    I just love GOG. I can’t help it. The price is just right, and with the numerous sales you can be sure to pick up some games dirt cheap. The website is well designed and easy to use. The forums give you all the information you need about modding and fixes. No need to install anything else, but the downloader is helpful.

    I’ve never been a fan boy before, I’m a bit scared of myself.

  30. Roshin says:

    “…so what could they add to the services listed below to make it more appealing?”

    System Shock 2, SubWar 2050, and actually digging through the piles of good *old* PC games, instead of looking in the opposite direction. That would do it. I wish they would stop fucking around, trying to look smarter than they are. It’s about old games. Stick to that.

    • Acorino says:

      There are indeed many old games I’d still love to see on GOG.com (like all the adventure games from Legend Entertainment, Azrael’s Tear, Entomorph,…), but I think we’re in desperate need of a digital distribution service that applies the principles of GOG.com to more recent games.
      And if it turns out that GOG.com will do it themselves, then I won’t complain. :)

  31. mendel says:

    Blue Coins are a ~5% rebate counting towards future purchases. They’re about as real as it gets without actually being money.

  32. Godwhacker says:

    Still quite ambivalent about GOG. They make sure the games work, and they’re only slightly too expensive. But I don’t *really* get the sudden Steam hatred- speaking as someone who can only play games on one computer at a time, the DRM thing doesn’t bother me too much. Plus there’s all the ancillary stuff Steam offers, like user groups, forums, support, automatic patching, brilliant download speeds, etc, etc.

    • Ragnar says:

      That’s all there is to it, really. Steam has great sales, good download speeds, and automatic patching, but their old games don’t always work, and you’re limited to one computer at a time. And manuals are usually available, but not always, and I always have to dig to find them. And the games sometimes do not play well with 3rd party mods / add-ons / patches.

      GoG has old games that work well on new OSes, the games are DRM free, and the manuals are easily accessible. They have more sales than Steam, but the sales are more limited.

      Both sites have great game forums, where you’ll find everything from support for getting the game to run to recommended mods or addons.

  33. cHeal says:

    New Video up. Definitely about new games being released.

    http://www.gog.com/en/news/special_feature_gogcom_commercials

  34. Sami H says:

    Dramatic music near the end of video 2. I recognise it. I can’t remember it. Help before I go insane.

  35. Beelzebud says:

    At this point I avoid viral marketing as if it were an actual virus.

  36. nootpingu86 says:

    Neither of these companies are your friend.

  37. bear912 says:

    As much as I seriously love Steam, I was highly amused by the little dig at Valve in the first commercial.

    • Brotoles says:

      I also enjoyed the jab at Valve in “complimentary cake”… The cake ISN’T a lie… :-)