Rockstar Reboots Social Club, Free Max Payne Comic

By Jim Rossignol on May 9th, 2012 at 8:30 pm.

Ahem.
To support the much-hyped launch of Max Payne 3, and attendant multiplayer facets, the clever bees of Rockstar have reworked their Social Club functionality, overhauling the whole thing for Max players. They report that their new outing will include “custom personal Social Club user profiles, an all-new Friends system with public and direct messaging, the ability to link in and login with your Facebook and Twitter accounts, Newswire activity and reply notifications.” And other stuff too, including the ability to be able to register your Max Payne 3 clan, should you wish to do such a thing. Rather more immediate gratification can be found in the free Marvel-produced comic, which details more backstory, and allows me to post amusing out-of-context leader images.

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38 Comments »

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  1. pipman3000 says:

    panel context: max was dreaming about a woman so fat her ass has it’s own zip code

  2. mehteh says:

    “an all-new Friends system with public and direct messaging, the ability to link in and login with your Facebook and Twitter accounts”

    Ever heard of Steam? plus ive seen games that link to twatbook and the likes without hte need for a bloated outside program. Just please make this a non-requirement for singleplayer. multi i dont give a damn about cuz its a console shooter(shallow)

    • Syra says:

      Call of Duty is a console shooter.

      This is Max.

    • PaulMorel says:

      Yes it is lame that Rockstar is going the GFWL-required-extra-login route … BUT … I can see the ability to log-in using Facebook as a very appealing feature to some people, at least for casual gamers. Just as in blogs, why should we maintain a million accounts? I prefer to log-in using Disqus or OpenID if possible. I can see many gamers (who don’t have Steam) liking the convenience of logging in with their Facebook accounts and automatically sharing their game experience with their friends. In fact, Steam should do this … and I say that as someone who doesn’t have a Fb account.

  3. JD Ogre says:

    Ugh. No thanks. Why would anyone want any of that Social Club crap? If I’d known it was being forced on you for GTA4 (which I deleted very soon after reaching the second island and which will never be installed ever again – partly because it sucks, partly because of the RSC), I never would’ve bought it. Its mere presence is guaranteeing I don’t buy Max Payne 3. (not that MP3 would be a high priority, anyways, due to everything I’ve heard painting it as basically having the name, but not the look or feel or storyline of a Max Payne game…)

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      Smashbox says:

      THERE’s a dissatisfied customer.

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      Crimsoneer says:

      Where have you heard that? Most of the previews, including RPS, seem to quite like it!

    • rockman29 says:

      I think if you actually read any of the previews from RPS, PCGamer, or basically anywhere else, you would’ve probably found out something different. I think you probably just imagined the words you wanted to see on your computer screen instead.

  4. Hoaxfish says:

    Rockstar Reboots Social Club

    Is it now a cover-based FPS?

  5. Freud says:

    I bet they omitted the option not to use Rockstar Social Club if you want to play Max Payne 3.

    • JD Ogre says:

      Can’t see why they’d put in an option to let you opt out of the spyware. Not in this day and age.

  6. Navagon says:

    Because if you paint a smiley face on it, pointless clusterfuck DRM doesn’t look so bad. Thanks for the warning, Rockstar. I’ll be avoiding this one.

  7. Syra says:

    ARGHHH that comic is so much bullshit. It messes with the story >< Why the hell do they need to add some stupid OH I WAS A CHILD OF A BROKEN HOME rubbish to a great character. Lots of little annoyances. I hope they aren't trying to make that crap canon.

    • Wolfox says:

      Exactly. That is so completely unlike the Max Payne we get to know in Max Payne 1 and 2 that it hurts.

      For the record, I think that the story in Max Payne 1 and 2 is ultimately about grief, and the way Max Payne 2 ends just begs you to stop there – it brings full closure to its underlying theme in a way that’s so effective and sublime that I personally think it’s one of the best stories (and endings) in any videogame ever, perhaps even in other medias. In terms of story, the very fact that Max Payne 3 exists (in this manner, that is) is a betrayal of the original story and character, and of everything it represents and means.

      In short, story-wise, Max Payne 3 makes as much sense to me as Highlander 2.

      • Tyrone Slothrop. says:

        Max Payne 2 ends just begs you to stop there – it brings full closure to its underlying theme in a way that’s so effective and sublime that I personally think it’s one of the best stories (and endings) in any videogame ever, perhaps even in other medias.

        How does it beg you to stop there? How do the events of Max Payne 2 bring any more closure than at the end of the first game? I think the second is a masterpiece but the ending made little sense, Max’s new love is brutally killed in his arms by one of his few former friends and it’s more than obviously clear that killing hundreds of people never releases Max from his demons. Max Payne 2 was fundamentally about that. Leaving aside the waxing and waning nature of suffering, even if you wholeheartedly accept the astoundingly minor catharsis at the end of Max Payne 2 in the words of Remedy; Max is really good at lying to himself…until the lies catch up with him.. Hell, Sam Lake co-wrote this comic and despite not being a fan of comics, let alone video-game tie-in ones, I felt it was beautifully depressing and poignant.

        How is even the existence of a third game, an explicit continuation of a character in perpetual emotional and psychological entropy dealing with multiple tragedies throughout his life in an astounding new location, attempting to cope with his demons in a compelling new location, remotely a betrayal of anything you perceive the character to be? Unless you think Max is some kind of typical action-movie avatar who absolves himself using violence as an explicitly redemptive force it’s an eminently logical continuation of the series.

        Even the comic brilliantly portrayed the pain of his childhood, he’s a character whose name doesn’t just suggest what he inflicts to others but what he’s experienced. His perceived failure to protect his mother from neglect, his propensity to violence and the crippling nature of the aggregate horrors in his life. It’s far more compelling characterisation than was ever in the often, deliberately cheesy and over-the-top original, even exceeding the sophistication of the second.

        • Wolfox says:

          OK, I’ll try answer your questions… to everyone else, SPOILER ALERT.

          How does it beg you to stop there? How do the events of Max Payne 2 bring any more closure than at the end of the first game?

          As I said, for me, the Max Payne games are about grief. So the first one starts with what causes Max Payne’s grief – the loss of his wife and baby child. During the development of the story in the games, you’ll see all aspects of grief intertwined (though anger is the most noticeable one). It’s subtly told, but very noticeable if you’re looking for it, mroe so in the second game than the first, but it’s the guiding line in both games.

          Now, here’s how the second game begins (quoting from the game script):

          “I lied to myself that it was over. I was still alive, my loved ones were still dead. It wasn’t over.”

          So, what compels and defines Max Payne in both games is the loss of his loved ones, and his unwillingness to accept it – hence, grief.

          Now, this is how Max Payne 2 ends, the very final phrase by Max in the game:

          “I had a dream of my wife. She was dead, but it was all right.”

          Acceptance. That’s where grief ends, and thus, that’s where the underlying theme of the game, and of the character, ends. And a great music kicks in, saying “it’s a late goodbye, such a late goodbye”. It’s perfect. It’s sublime. It’s effective, and it BEGS you to stop there. Because Max is ready to move on, and how he moves on is no longer the focus, and if Max is moving on, so should you. Grief is gone, and whatever happens next is left to imagination, and that’s a big part of why it’s so effective.

          Now, think about it: getting Max back into grief (and showing a depressed, drunk Max) destroys the brilliant closure in the second game. Max Payne 3’s story simply ignores how the second one concludes and just retcons its conclusion into a cheesy, easy “troubled childhood” card. Max’ problems in the first two games had all to do with losing his wife and child, NOT with having family problems prior to that. Also, in the first two games, there are no indications whatsoever that Max was ever violent before the loss of his wife and child, or anything like that.

          I think the second is a masterpiece but the ending made little sense, Max’s new love is brutally killed in his arms by one of his few former friends and it’s more than obviously clear that killing hundreds of people never releases Max from his demons.

          Did you know that, if you finish Max Payne 2 in the highest difficulty, Mona survives? Regardless of that, of course killing hundreds of people never released Max from his demons, because the only thing capable of releasing Max of his demons is Max himself (“mirrors are more fun than television”, remember?), and he does that in the very last line of Max Payne 2. That’s my point.

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    Crimsoneer says:

    I just cancelled my pre-order…I wasn’t hugely exciteda bout this in the first place, so I think I’ll wait for reviews. Shame really, because Gamestop IE is stocking it for £23 quid.

  9. buzzmong says:

    Nnnngh. I was already on the fence about Max Payne 3 due to removal of the graphic novel scenes between levels and from what I’ve read in reviews about the game constantly stealing control of the player to do a quick cutscene (almost as bad as quicktime events).

    Rockstar Social Club will see me avoid it like GTA4, or, buy it for the 360.

    • Werthead says:

      Did you ever play the originals? I just fired up MAX PAYNE 1 from my original disc (after a bit of tinkering to get it working on Windows 7) and the game rips control away from you for a mini-cut-scene (in-game or comic book) very frequently. Probably more often than say CRYSIS 2.

      • buzzmong says:

        Oh yes, it does do it on occasion, but the previews I’ve read for MP3 says’s it’s extremely frequent and for *really* mini cutscenes, like about 2 seconds long.

  10. Xzi says:

    Yeah, that’s JUST what we needed. Another “social platform” to remember another set of username/password on. Will they also be turning it into a distribution platform later on?

  11. sinister agent says:

    I’m really getting sick of all these restrictions on how we can play games, being passed off as “social” things. They’re not. If I want to socialise with people, there are already a dozen ways to do it regardless of what game I want to play, or indeed, whether I want to play a game at all.

  12. elnalter says:

    lol when i got gta4 from a friend on steam, i had to run steam, gfwl, and rockstar social crap. no thanks

  13. whydidyoumakemeregister says:

    Are you forced to register for this if you play Rockstar games on PC? I’m ignorant; I’ve only played GTA4 and RDD on the 360 and as far as I can recall it was completely optional.

    • smacky says:

      Having dealt with GTA4 on PC, yes it is a mandatory login before you get to play. It’s one of the reasons I never play GTA4 anymore, despite having not beaten it.

      • Werthead says:

        This is not quite the case. With GTA4 every time the Rockstar Social log-in page popped up I clicked ‘Skip (Play Offline)’ and never had to sign into it at all.

        If you want to play multiplayer, however, I believe it is mandatory. Since I’ve never played GTA4 or Episodes multiplayer, that’s not been an issue.

  14. Turkey says:

    Kinda lame of Marvel to start a studio just for taking video game promo jobs. There’s probably lots of independent artists and writers who could use some of that sweet soul sucking tie-in money.

  15. rocketman71 says:

    When will those idiots learn that Steam is the only resident thing I’ll allow running besides my game?. GFWL, Social Club, Origin, etc can all go to hell.

    Social Club (and the rest also) was the reason I didn’t buy GTA4. It seems it will also be the final nail in the coffin por Max Payne 3.

    • neolith says:

      Pretty much this.

      It’s not like I love Steam that much, but it is already on my machine. The thing is – I am not having another useless piece of shitware for any game on my machine, no matter how social its makers claim it to be…

    • Werthead says:

      Hmm. Maybe they’ve changed how Social Club works, but when I played GTA4 for the first time (November 2011) I never had to use it. I simply clicked on the ‘Play Offline’ thing when it popped up and Social Club never started.

      I honestly can’t remember if I had to create a profile for it, but if so, creating a profile and then never using it and never loading the programme isn’t the end of the world.

      How Social Club will work with MP3 remains to be fully seen, however. Like GTA4 you need it for multiplayer, but I haven’t seen if you can just ignore it for SP.

  16. DickSocrates says:

    RSC and GFWL worked so well with GTAIV! So well, you could ‘patch’ them out.

    Clearly, Rockstar is run by some really dumb corporate people who don’t have the first clue what they’re doing, or why.

  17. Guhndahb says:

    Yuck. That’s bad, but unsurprising, news.

  18. PC-GAMER-4LIFE says:

    PC Gamer think Max Payne3 is a GFWL title as RSC integrates with GFWL but Steam is nowhere in sight!
    http://www.pcgamer.com/2012/05/09/max-payne-3-supported-by-revamped-rockstar-games-social-club/