Open Hexagon Copies Cavanagh

By Nathan Grayson on November 20th, 2012 at 10:00 am.

Yes, give me the toughest, pinkest challenge you've got.

Update 1 – there’s been some kind of breakdown in communications here, as it transpires that Terry Cavanagh isn’t as cool with this game as we first thought. While the Open Hexagon dev was given a blessing to make a game ‘inspired’ by Super Hexagon, he was explicitly told that it couldn’t be a clone. And yet… So, if you like Open Hexagon please be sure to give your support to the creator of the game it so liberally borrows from once Super Hexagon itself arrives on PC.

Update 2 – the creator of Open Hexagon has apologised profusely for releasing his clone game before the PC/Mac version of Super Hexagon, and attempted to explain why he got the wrong end of the stick.

Original:

Terry “VVVVVV/delightful human being” Cavanagh’s Super Hexagon is an evil, evil thing. Other games take the time to introduce themselves and shake your hand. Super Hexagon immediately punches you in the face and draws blood. But then – vision fuzzy and head still pounding – you get up and give it another go. Seconds later, you’re back on the ground. This process continues until you look like a lumpier version of Grimace, the (in this case aptly named) McDonald’s mascot, but for some unknowable reason, you don’t stop. You never stop. never stop. Because, you know, it’s pretty great and stuff. And while a PC version’s on the way, developer Vittorio Romeo got Cavanagh’s permission to put his own open source spin on the eternally rotating formula.

I like the voice in Cavanagh’s version better. Beyond that world-shattering alteration, though, this is pretty much Super Hexagon – just more open, on PC, and free. Happily, you can customize everything (rotation speed and, um, yep) and design your own levels, so it ought to be interesting to see what players come up with.

Cavanagh himself, meanwhile, is surprisingly cool with Open Hexagon’s existence. OK, well, mostly. He explained on Twitter:

“I’m a little upset that he released it before I had a chance to release Super Hexagon on PC myself – but I’m basically alright with it! I’ve just checked it out there, and it’s not bad at all – the harder octagon stage was pretty cool. I also like the death effect. I’m hoping Super Hexagon will be out on PC and Mac REALLY soon – I’m working flat out to make that happen!”

He’s even posted about it over on Free Indie Games, so all’s well that ends well, I suppose. It’s quite well done, too. The music’s suitably thumping, and the restart button triggers without pausing for so much as an instant. Which is good, given that it’s something you’ll be pressing several trillion times.

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21 Comments »

  1. Xzi says:

    I took one look at the Youtube video and gave it a royal, “FUUUUCK THAT” for the sake of my sanity. Don’t get me wrong, I like the music and the general idea and I wish the developers all the success in the world for it, but I immediately envisioned me getting frustrated with myself to the point of smashing my keyboard with my skull.

    • Shadowcat says:

      Yeah, that pretty much sums up my reaction as well! I shall turn and run away from the horror of the rotating bullet/polygon hell…

  2. MOKKA says:

    After playing the ‘regular’ (and free) Hexagon on Terry’s Homepage I can’t wait to play Super Hexagon. I even have the feeling that I might be good at it.

  3. SquareWheel says:

    This is not an easy video to watch.

  4. Wedge says:

    You have to design the levels? This really seems like something that should be generating that stuff procedurally, though I guess nobody has really made any leaps in that tech since Audiosurf.

  5. Sinkytown says:

    Super Hexagon is tied with XCOM for my game of the year.

  6. Ed says:

    “And while a PC version’s on the way, developer Vittorio Romeo got Cavanagh’s permission to put his own open source spin on the eternally rotating formula.”

    I think this is incorrect. Here’s a tweet from Terry from a while ago, with screenshot of the entire email exchange:

    https://twitter.com/terrycavanagh/status/269893048463413249

    I think it’s fair to say that this is pretty much an exact clone (with a few tweaks) rather than a “game inspired by Super Hexagon” and probably one of the shittiest thing you could possibly do to a developer stressing over finishing a port of a game.
    However, I don’t think it was done out of malice, and clearly Terry is extremely magnanimous about it.

    (Maybe I’m speaking out of turn, but I don’t like the slant in the story here)

    • Pop says:

      I guess the rule is: if you enjoy something show your appreciation with cash and support the original developer (Terry)

  7. Sup says:

    It is not Cavanagh-Approved, according to twitter

    http://twitter.com/terrycavanagh/status/270857729877352448

  8. Punchbowled says:

    Er, yeah this story needs a rewrite frankly.

  9. JonasKyratzes says:

    Terry Cavanagh is quite possibly the nicest person in indie gaming (in competition with Rob Fearon), and his reaction to this rather shameless clone shows that sometimes he is too nice for his own good.

    I don’t believe that the Open Hexagon developer was being intentionally malicious, but making a clone when you’ve been explicitly told not to is simply not OK. The only honourable course of action would be to take the game down and rework it into something original-ish.

  10. Alextended says:

    Advertise free clone, tell people to still get the as of yet unavailable original, nice.

  11. Randomer says:

    Haven’t listened to the Super Hexagon soundtrack yet, but I’m impressed that the music in the video above sounded so much like Souleye’s VVVVVV soundtrack.

  12. jonfitt says:

    Terry should hire this guy. He cloned the game on PC quicker than Terry could port it!

    • Carra says:

      Hehe, I thought that too.

      The guy didn’t make any money from his open source project though so it’s not like he’s evil.

      • ribobura osserotto says:

        PROTIP: Most developers in this new indie games wave aren’t exactly competent programmers.

  13. Carra says:

    The free port really needs mouse support. Playing it with the keyboard doesn’t feel right.