The RPS Bargain Bucket: Swear To It

By Lewie Procter on June 1st, 2013 at 1:00 pm.


I am the man with my finger on the pulse of the market for discounted digitally distributed entertainment software for personal computing devices. Hear me roar. This week there are some cheap games, so I might as well tell you about them, and you might as well pay attention. If you want more cheap games, pop along to SavyGamer.co.uk. Pretty please with sugar on top. Here’s this week’s bucket full of bargains:

BioShock Infinite – £16.99
Registers on Steam.
I didn’t enjoy this Bioshock as much as the first. I made the mistake of playing it on 1999 mode from the start, assuming that it meant it would be have the kind of difficulty that games from the 90s had, but what it actually meant was that it was a modern game designed for modern audiences, and then they gave all the enemies a stupidly large amount of health, and me a stupidly small one. The worst implementation of increased difficulty possible. There’s some fantastic bits in Bioshock Infinite, but the illusion that you’re in an actual floating city doesn’t hold up anywhere near as well as the illusion that I was in an actual underwater city in the first. It’s also way more Just A Shooter than Bioshock was, but I actually think Bioshock 2 had better gunplay. The rifts and vigours are less interesting and less systemic than the combination of hacking and plasmids in the first game. You never really get the feeling that the other characters are just existing in their habitat, everyone is either A Character With Exposition To Spout, or A Baddie That Is Trying To Kill You. Elizabeth doesn’t get in the way, which is better than if she did get in the way, but I didn’t really care about her. Sorry, Ken. Here’s wot Alec thought.

Forge, Gas Guzzlers, Pressure, Primordia & Richard and Alice – £3.79/€4.43/$5.75 at time of writing.
Price will fluctuate over time, as explained here. Forge, Pressure & Primordia register on Steam.
Another interesting selection of games available for not very much money from the folks over at Indie Royale. Here’s wot John thought of Richard & Alice:

The story told is a splendid one, incredibly moving and surprisingly twisty. The relationship between Alice and Barney is a triumph, and handled with great care. There’s certainly a bit of the young-writer-likes-to-swear to it, in places it could be more mature, but it’s always engaging, engrossing, and delivers the punches where they’re needed.

Sounds fucking fantastic to me. Read the rest here.

Back to the Future: The Game, Hector: Badge of Carnage, Poker Night at the Inventory, Puzzle Agent, Puzzle Agent 2, Sam & Max: The Devil’s Playhouse, Wallace & Gromit’s Grand Adventures & The Walking Dead – £2.81/€3.28/$4.26 at time of writing
Or pay any price to get everything but The Walking Dead. Registers on Steam.
That is a lot of Telltale. I’ve never enjoyed any of their games, I even tried The Walking Dead, and it seems like a buggy mess of quick time events, stiff dialogue and silly puzzles. But what do I know, I’m just a man that likes games where you jump on baddies heads. Here’s wot John thought about it:

As with the majority of zombie fiction, it doesn’t attempt to do anything original. It’s a small group of survivors, each with their own quirks, trying to defend temporarily safe locations, while arguing with each other. But as is the point of the genre, it’s not about the undead outside, but the nature of the humans still alive, and here it succeeds. Relationships, the danger of sharing too much in a tense situation, individual values, and the confusion of previous concerns in an utterly different world, all play out pretty well.

More here, and thoughts on subsequent episodes from Adam here and here.

Dishonored – £7.49.
Registers on Steam.
Thief with superpowers. Gothic-Punk Deus Ex. Dishonored is a jack of all trade, and a master of several of them. It’s a proper stealth game, a proper stabby action game, and it’s got some of the most beautiful locations I’ve ever seen in a game. Here’s Adam’s take:

It feels like a game from another timeline, one where Thief and System Shock set the bar for what first-person games could be, leading to designs that were built around intelligent use of space and world-building. I still wish Dishonored were longer but I also recognise that it takes a great deal of skill, hard work and time to create something of this quality; to ask for more in terms of content would be to ask for less in so many other ways. What we really should be asking is for other developers to learn the lessons that Arkane can teach them.

More here. Bit of a masterpiece, this, I reckon.

Deal of the week
Awesomenauts, Capsized, Dear Esther, Hotline Miami, Little Inferno, Proteus & Thomas Was Alone – £3.71/€4.35/$5.64
My oh my this is a good bundle. Hotline Miami is the best game. The best game. I’m probably going to rush compiling the rest of the bargain bucket so that I can play some Hotline Miami. I found Awesomenauts to be tedious as hell, but if you like MOBAs maybe you’ll like this one? I’ve not played Capsized, but everything else here is worth a look. Dear Esther is a window into mind of someone who is so gripped by loss and regret that they’re starting to lose their mind, whilst wandering around a pretty island. Proteus is a Chill The Fuck Out ‘Em Up, where you also wander around a pretty island taking in the sights and sounds. Thomas Was Alone is a smartly designed puzzle platformer that tells the story of some pieces of geometry learning the meaning of friendship. Little Inferno is a joke game where the joke sort of ruins it, but the presentation is so magnificent, and the ending so powerful, that it’s worth enduring the nonsense.

Also of note:
Activision promo at GOG.
Batman: Arkham City [Goatee Edition] – £4/€6/$6. Apply coupon “GMG20-JLKSA-7A8HA”. Registers on Steam.
Call of Juarez: Gunslinger – £7.20. Apply coupon “GMG20-JLKSA-7A8HA”. Registers on Steam.
Blackwell Convergence, Blackwell Deception, Blackwell Legacy, Blackwell Unbound, Hacker Evolution Untold, Pixelry & Super Tower Rush – Pay What You Want. Hacker Evolution Untold and the Blackwell games register on Steam.
FTL – £3.28/€3.84/$4.99. Registers on Steam.
The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim – £9.99. Registers on Steam.

SavyGamer.co.uk is a website where you can find out about all the cheap games.

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69 Comments »

  1. subedii says:

    I didn’t enjoy this Bioshock as much as the first. I made the mistake of playing it on 1999 mode from the start, assuming that it meant it would be have the kind of difficulty that games from the 90s had, but what it actually meant was that it was a modern game designed for modern audiences, and then they gave all the enemies a stupidly large amount of health, and me a stupidly small one. The worst implementation of increased difficulty possible. There’s some fantastic bits in Bioshock Infinite, but the illusion that you’re in an actual floating city doesn’t hold up anywhere near as well as the illusion that I was in an actual underwater city in the first. It’s also way more Just A Shooter than Bioshock was, but I actually think Bioshock 2 had better gunplay. The rifts and vigours are less interesting and less systemic than the combination of hacking and plasmids in the first game. You never really get the feeling that the other characters are just existing in their habitat, everyone is either A Character With Exposition To Spout, or A Baddie That Is Trying To Kill You. Elizabeth doesn’t get in the way, which is better than if she did get in the way, but I didn’t really care about her. Sorry, Ken.

    Wow Lewie. Seriously, even though this is just a short blurb, I don’t think I’ve agreed so much with any review of Bioshock: Infinite as I have with this. And all in the space of a paragraph.

    Tremendous amounts of gushing hype about how it was revolutionary and goes beyond any game this generation, and it’s the best Bioshock ever lead to me picking it up. To be honest, I’ve had a hard time finishing it just out of boredom with the combat.

    It’s actually the game that influenced me to finish Dishonored instead, so I guess that’s a net plus?

    • Tacroy says:

      I think it’s largely because for some reason people started making the mistake of conflating their feelings about the story with their feelings about the gameplay.

      Yeah okay sure it has a significantly better story than “shoot bad mans in the face”. That’s good for the story. Now what can you give me for gameplay? Oh, is it just “shoot bad mans in the face”? Well damn, that means the gameplay kinda sucks.

      It’s really a game with multiple personalities – there’s the bright and shining story, excellent environments, and great out-of-combat music. Then there’s the other 70% of the game, which is tedious “go shoot mans over here, go shoot mans over there, go shoot mans everywhere”.

      It’s really like someone decided to take a great game that wasn’t quite long enough for a AAA release, smash it in to bits, and then glue it back together with shitty combat filler.

      • The Random One says:

        The gameplay by itself was not really that bad, and the level design is sterling at parts (and utterly confusing at others). But the high amount of ‘weird’ enemies, each vying for the Big Daddy position, makes for a series of repetitive boss fights. And the Handymen are just boring to kill.

        • jimmydean239 says:

          Hate to follow the crowd, but Bioshock Infinite was a gaming highlight of the decade for me. It’s a first person shooter sure, and if you don’t like those then you probably won’t like BI, but I’ve always liked them. It felt like it was a glorious return to the single player games of the past in my opinion, and a great antidote to today’s modern shooters which are focused disproportionately on multiplayer, and using racial stereotypes and action movie cliches to make an impact. The art was simply stunning too.

      • AvistTorch says:

        I actually found myself in the opposite camp with this. I thought the gameplay was fine, though the two-weapon limit got in the way more often than I liked. However, the story wasn’t all that good, and the concepts it used were far from unique. Granted, it definitely had its moments — a certain late-game location just oozed atmosphere, for instance — but overall, I found myself scratching my head at all the praise for the story.

      • MadTinkerer says:

        In my case, I was one of those who quickly realized that Booker’s characterization as a far-less-than-perfect guy who has a severe history of violence went along perfectly with the manshooting parts. In fact, I felt that if you pay attention to the story and the characters’ opinions of each other, it’s all quite coherent.

        Booker really is a dangerous, city-wrecking force of nature and the citizens should be afraid of him because violence breaks out wherever he goes. It’s not completely his fault, and his real motivation is that he’s just trying to leave with Elizabeth, but he is complicit in the violence. Thus, the entire story really does make sense and is appropriate for the gameplay. The story is a commentary on the gameplay, and the gameplay supports the story.

        As for the setting: nice clean city in which fights keep breaking out and things go very, very bad… Well yes. Duh. Columbia is Rapture on New Year’s Eve 1959 and you are Adam. The main difference this time being that the “rebel” leader is an idealist who takes her ideals too far instead of a con man who [spoiler for Bioshock 1 censored]. Heck: notice the part where you jump dimensions and the alternate Booker was a martyr for the rebels? Booker Prime doesn’t experience that part because Jack already went through that story from the player’s viewpoint. Colombia becomes more and more like Rapture as the story progresses, even referencing the bad endings of Bioshock 1 and 2 with Future Elizabeth’s war on the rest of civilization.

        If it still doesn’t make sense to you, consider that the entire city is built by an alternate Evil(er) version of Booker. Of course the entire place is designed like a theme park full of set-pieces for battles and staffed by violent madmen, with the functioning city parts as a secondary concern. It’s completely consistent with Evil(er) Booker’s character. Remember: he knows you’re coming because he’s a science-powered “prophet”. He designed the whole place to funnel you through it in a certain way. Yes: he’s trying to stop you, but the Luteces keep grabbing Bookers and tossing them back into Colombia until one of them gets that much further. The conflict between the precognitive “Comstock” and the time-travelling Luteces literally shapes the whole city around the conflict.

    • DrGonzo says:

      Yeah, well done lewie.

      as for a good story. It still frustrates me how little sense the plot made. And how much i hated the companion character. So i didn’t even enjoy that. Nice environments tho yeah.

    • DrScuttles says:

      This is a comment to concur with subedii’s agreement of Lewie’s appraisal of Bioshock Infinite.
      In all seriousness, this is perhaps the review I’ve read that most lines up with my feelings for the game; too many pieces that I’ve read about it either gush with praise for the game as the greatest thing since the toaster or get bogged down in pedantic nitpickery.
      Story can be even more subjective that the mechanics, but the whole notion of there being infinite realities only oh no, some things are always destined the be the same felt contrived to fit in with the themes.

    • KDR_11k says:

      True, the only reasons that I finished it was because everybody was doing a spoilercast and I installed it on my SSD (on purpose so that I’m forced to finish it to reclaim those 20+GB). It really was a slog. Not the combat itself so much as the constant search for the stupid powerups that are hidden in all the corners. Because I felt that if I didn’t search enough I might end up underpowered. I’ve started hating hidden permanent upgrades when I played FEAR and spent so much time searching for health upgrades. That kind of stuff is best left to openworld or Metroidvania games where you can return for the things you’ve missed when it turns out that you really need them to continue.

      As far as story goes I think Virtue’s Last Reward was a better game story. Yes, the game had less gameplay than Bioshock but it was satisfying puzzle gameplay and Bioshock’s overstayed its welcome by far so having less isn’t really a downside.

    • mbp says:

      I have to respectfully disagree. I played Dishonored and Bioshock Inifinite back to back and whereas Dishonored is a very good example of a type of game we already know I believe that Bioshock infinite is something much more than that. Bioshock Infinite for me was a complete emotional experience. The incredible setting and the deeply imaginative storyline completely enthralled me. I admit that some of the combat was sucky especially on harder difficulty levels, in fact I would recommend anyone to play the game on easy mode for the best experience. However I really do believe Bioshock infinite has advanced the art of making games. Perhaps for the first time every I felt that I was experiencing not just a game but a work of creative expression on a par with a great movie or great book.

      • Iamerror says:

        I gotta agree with this; obviously some put more focus on gameplay and systems, but ultimately I see those systems as a means to engage the user in an interesting narrative / emotionally involve them than the core focus of the product, so for me Bioshock : Infinite was easily one of the best games this generation.

        • subedii says:

          And I’ll have to respectfully disagree. The plot and characters didn’t really stand up for me. Elizabeth had some great moments, but in general I don’t think she was as in-depth a character as everyone was constantly saying.

      • Iceman346 says:

        While Dishonored was perhaps the more complete game from a gameplay standpoint (giving you more possibility of variation while Infinite is focused on the killing) I was quite disappointed in the story itself.

        The world of Dishonored is beautifully crafted and really interesting. I would love to see more of that. But the storyline itself was imo rather bland, predictable and didn’t stray from the course the beginning set it up for.

        While I still love Dishonored (and it was my personal GotY 2012) for me the more intriguing story and Elizabeth itself just make Infinite the superior game.

    • Nova says:

      The gameplay actually had its moments after the first 6 or so hours. I had some fun battles on hard difficulty with upgraded Murder of Crows, Charge, the Colt and the sky rails/hooks.

      The worst thing about Binfinite was the looting.

      • Vandelay says:

        Quite. I think that much of the complaining aimed at the gameplay comes from people that just don’t like linear FPS games, as the combat itself was some of the better stuff we have seen in the genre for a while. It wasn’t perfect and I definitely preferred the quieter, story driven moments, but it was still fun and faster paced than the majority of wannabe CoDs we have seen in recent years.

        Most of the boss fights were quite dire though.

        • subedii says:

          If I didn’t like linear FPS’s, I never would have liked Half-Life 2.

          I think part of the problem is as Lewie described in that the difficulty doesn’t really work out too well if you play it on the harder difficulties. It just turns enemies into bullet sponges and results in the gameplay feeling more tedious.

          Subjective etc.

          • Vandelay says:

            Most likely true. I did play on hard and found it to be perfectly fine myself, except for in the some of the boss fights. I never did try 1999 mode though, which is where I would think most of the problems are found. As Lewie says, I have heard in many places that it made enemies very bullet spongy, rather than what it promised to be.

            Still, I’ve seen a lot of people moaning about it being too slow and too much like other modern FPSs (see Total Biscuits review, for example,) which just seems completely alien to my playthrough, where I was leaping form sky rails, dashing at enemies and utilising multiple vigors in a single fight. I certainly used cover, but not in the way you are forced to in plenty of other titles, which encourage you to stick behind cover far too much. I definitely found the combat more enjoyable than the previous Bioshock games and the second one had already done it pretty well.

    • nrvsNRG says:

      100% behind Lewie on this one.
      Bio:Infinite is the most over hyped game in recent history (along with Skyrim and GTA4). Cant believe I pre ordered and got the season pass too.
      Couldnt finish more then half the game but I’m gonna give it a go when all the dlc is out.

    • Zenicetus says:

      Great summary, Lewie, at least for those of us who shared that impression of the game.

      The only two things that I thought Binfinite did spectacularly well, were the environment design and, in retrospect, the programming for Elizabeth as a companion. I hate “escort missions” in just about any type of game, and even sidekick AI companions can sometimes be annoying in games like Fallout NV or Skyrim. I give the Binfinite devs credit for creating the first sidekick that I didn’t have to worry about defending, who was helpful when needed, and who stayed out of the way otherwise.

      I never felt the kind of emotional connection to Elizabeth that the devs were trying to create, so story-wise it was a failure for me. Just a little too much leaning on Damsel in Distress for me to buy into, I guess. But I have to admire the game mechanics.

      Aside from those two things, I didn’t enjoy it much. I did finish the game, but the last hour or so was just slogging through to reach the ending. They could have done so much more, but instead they gave your character just one way to interact with the world — shooting people in the face, and way too often in predictable shooting galleries that just seemed like filler. A waste of a good concept.

    • Revisor says:

      I very rarely buy games on release. With Bioshock Infinite I made an exception based, yes, on the RPS’ enthusiastic review.

      It was a mistake that discouraged me from doing it again.

      Not that it was a bad game, but all Lewie’s points ring true. It was a mediocre shooter with a pretty good story as far as games go (pretty cliche if you watch any of the dozens scifi/supernatural TV series, eg. Fringe with its parallel universes) and nice art style.

  2. MasterDex says:

    Alan Wake also has a big 90% cut to its price this weekend for anyone still interested. I’ve held off for some time now but for €3.60, I don’t see any reason to.

  3. Noburu says:

    Probably not the best idea to even list FTL as it was the deal of the day on Steam and ends in around ~5 hours of you posting this.

    The game itself is definitely worth the full $10 though.

    • subedii says:

      If you order direct from the dev they usually get more of the money than if you did via Steam. Although I’m not sure what the breakdowns are if you’re going via other companies.

      EDIT: That said, I have an aversion to Paypal, so I might just order off of Steam regardless.

    • Andy_Panthro says:

      Finally decided to buy FTL, after wondering if I’d actually enjoy it at all given what I’d read here and elsewhere.

      I spent my first proper attempt running for my life, occasionally almost running out of fuel twice, and finally being destroyed after a gradual process of losing my poor little men/women/engie/slugthings one by one to fire and boarders.

      I kind of felt it was rather unfair, and a bit too difficult even on easy.

      I’m also probably going to be playing it all weekend, because even with the frustrations it makes you think: “maybe next time I’ll be able to save up some scrap, and find a decent weapon and not lose all my men!”

      Absolutely worth the £3.49, which is a rather tiny amount of money to pay for a decent game isn’t it?

      • Nidokoenig says:

        It’s not unfair, it treats everyone that way. The real meat of FTL is managing the economy, thinking to yourself, if I pay X scrap for this now, how much scrap is that going to save me, is that more than what the other options will give me? Should I choose the options that makes me a bit of a bastard but are quite lucrative?
        This is most obvious on Normal where you’re pretty much forced to live on the edge and fully optimise your choices. I’ve never actually played on Easy, though, and I was quite happy to learn slowly and only get my first victory after 49 hours, and only unlock all the main ships after 140 hours(That slug ship was a pain in the arse).
        Don’t feel bad about losing. An experienced player should only win about 20% of the time on Normal if the devs got the balance to fit their vision. It trends harsh so that you know when you win that it wasn’t just a run of good luck, though that certainly helps.

        • Andy_Panthro says:

          My comment about the “fairness” of it wasn’t intended to come across as being bitter or annoyed at it. I am enjoying it.

          It is “unfair” though, as your progression through the sectors is based on very little information. You can make poor choices in your navigation without even realising it, and retracing your steps isn’t an option. In my short time with the game (only 5 playthroughs, never further than sector 5), I have had good and bad times in equal measure, sometimes you get exactly what you need in the next jump, and sometimes it’s just another nail in your coffin.

          By comparison (and it’s a poor comparison, because they’re not that similar) in Nethack, you have the ability to backtrack and make safe spaces. When you die, it often provides you with a clear reason why you failed, and gives you an idea of what to do differently the next time you find yourself in a similar situation.

          I’ve been learning quickly how best to utilise my crew, power and offence/defence in FTL. I still have much to learn, but even then I will have to rely on a large amount of luck. Sometimes the game will throw too many obstacles in your path, and not enough rewards.

          Even with all that, I am enjoying the game and will continue to play it.

      • kalirion says:

        The FTL difficulties are mislabeled. Instead of “Easy” and “Normal” they should be “Normal” and “Hard.”

        After a bunch of attempts you’ll figure out how to handle yourself in fights and special events.

        And after getting slaughtered a few times by the final boss, you’ll figure out what you need for that fight.

        • Andy_Panthro says:

          I’ve begun to do well in the fights against the earlier enemy ships, but I still need to master drones and boarding/being boarded. I can’t wait to see the final boss though, I hope I’ll be able to at least give it a good fight!

          I agree on the difficulty levels too, “easy” is certainly mislabelled, as it is anything but! Thankfully what I had read previously meant I knew I was going to have to die a lot before I would progress significantly.

  4. drewski says:

    I was all over that Humble Bundle the second I knew about it. Hotline Miami finally at the right price.

    • Skabooga says:

      Knowing my tastes, I’m not entirely sure I’ll like Hotline Miami, but between that and Capszied and Proteus and Thomas Was Alone, there is an excellent chance I’ll really get into one of the games.

    • nearly says:

      my thoughts exactly, but after playing it I kind of wish I hadn’t waited. it’s exactly my sort of game and the developers should be rewarded with more of my money

  5. Yosharian says:

    Bioshock Infinite is 10x better than Dishonored, but they’re both great games. Well worth picking up for that price. Just gonna add that 1999 mode makes the combat side of BI _so_ much better, despite a handful of very tricky/frustrating moments.

    • DrGonzo says:

      I thought it was hilariously broken in 1999 mode. Those big monkey guys for example, if you get killed by one at the wrong spot, he will kill you during your re spawning animation meaning you have to reload the game, as it’s stuck in a never ending loop.

    • Crimsoneer says:

      I don’t see how you could possibly say Infinite is better than Dishonored. It’s got a very interesting story, and it’s very pretty, but all the rest of the game is hopelessly confused. Most people only used 2 or 3 guns and vigors during the entire game. The bosses are rubbish. The story is broken. It’s a wonderful game, but it’s also obvious that it had several serious u-turns during development. Dishonored is very, very good at doing what it wants to do, with the only major mistake being it’s strange morality and non-lethality shenanigans.

      • Yosharian says:

        I disagree.

        • The Random One says:

          I respect your disagreement and politely request you expand upon your opinions if you so desire, so that we may learn about each others’ ideas of good game design.

          • Yosharian says:

            Very well, I’ll try to explain.

            “I don’t see how you could possibly say Infinite is better than Dishonored. It’s got a very interesting story, and it’s very pretty, but all the rest of the game is hopelessly confused. Most people only used 2 or 3 guns and vigors during the entire game. The bosses are rubbish. The story is broken. It’s a wonderful game, but it’s also obvious that it had several serious u-turns during development. Dishonored is very, very good at doing what it wants to do, with the only major mistake being it’s strange morality and non-lethality ”

            He dismisses BI’s story as if it is ultimately unimportant, but I believe that BI does two things exceptionally well with story, which is the story and the world which is the vector through which the story is told. BI is not really an open world or sandbox game, but neither is it a mere corridor shooter in the same vein as Call of Duty for example. In this respect, Dishonored shares some elements, however Dishonored’s story and world do not ‘mesh’ together in the same way. Dishonored’s world is a playground in which you complete missions, and then the story progresses during cutscenes or storytelling moments. In this way the story and world of Dishonored are ‘disconnected’. BI doesn’t suffer from this problem. Every moment spent in BI’s world provides progression along the story route; everything is ‘tight’.

            Using only ’2 or 3 guns’ and only a few vigors is mistakenly seen as a problem – it isn’t. What matters in combat is creating an environment where the player can learn to be an ‘expert’ with chosen weapons/spells/etc, thus learning how to use a toolbox masterfully to solve problems. The need, or urge to be seen to have a great multitude of tools in your toolbox is an error in game development. The player doesn’t need a hundred tools, he merely needs a few effective ones which he can then master and begin to use ‘instinctively’. This is where Dishonored falls to pieces, because the player has so many tools, each brutally effective, that choice is irrelevant. A maxed blink renders the game, on the hardest difficulty, a cakewalk. Weapons are all deadly and effective at the beginning, requiring no upgrades at all, and furthermore you get far too many upgrades anyway, being able to upgrade everything eventually. BI’s weapons and spells are pretty varied, but you choose which ones to upgrade, your ‘favourites’, you create combinations to solve a variety of problems, and no one weapon or spell can solve any situation.

            The boss fights are quite interesting in this game, the only one I found to be a little frustrating was the Ghost Mother.

            The story is ‘broken’ I’m not quite sure what he means by that. Same for ‘strange morality’ and ‘non-lethality’.

        • derbefrier says:

          I thought Dishonored was rather weak myself. I got bored and didn’t even finish it but I did finish Bioshock. I mean Disonored wasn’t a horrible game but so easy and unbalanced it just got boring within a few hours. when I found myself completing missions on the hardest difficulty without even breaking a sweat I just got bored and quit playing. The AI was dumb as shit.. your abilities completely overpowered and the story uninteresting. Great concept, horrible implementation. Bioshocks story wasn’t much better but at least the game itself was challenging enough to keep me interested and playing till the end.

      • Iamerror says:

        “I don’t see how you could possibly say Infinite is better than Dishonored. It’s got a very interesting story, and it’s very pretty, but all the rest of the game is hopelessly confused. ”

        Meanwhile Dishonored has a range of interesting systems in order to kill people, but a dull and incredibly bland story / characters…which ultimately means I don’t care about those systems because I play for the experience and interactive narrative over the same old tired gameplay systems, which are there merely to give me various ways to interact with that narrative. Infinite managed to make me care about the narrative happenings and the world, whereas Dishonored had me thinking about gameplay systems – which to me makes Infinite the superior experience.

  6. Moni says:

    Buy The Walking Dead, seriously, it’s one of the greatest games of this decade. It is just astonishingly good.

    Although, it’s also really wonky, and it would only work for me if I unplugged my internet.

    • HadToLogin says:

      It’s not a great game. It’s great interactive story. But strip it out of talking and you’re left with QTEs and “follow the white dots”. It’s great when you play it for first time and learn what happens, but even second playthrough can be quite boring, since decisions doesn’t really change anything.

      • malkav11 says:

        So? There’s nothing wrong with games designed, as The Walking Dead is, to be played once and be done with them. Just gotta judge what that’s worth to you monetarily.

        • Martel says:

          I think this is a great point. Even if they aren’t, do all games need replayability? t I have so many damn games that I often don’t even finish them let alone play the same game twice.

          • malkav11 says:

            I personally consider replayability to be more of a downside than a plus exactly because I have a ridiculous number of games to play. A game that wants me to play repeatedly to have a full experience thusly becomes less appealing to play even once. (Though the duration of a single playthrough does make some difference here. If an average full playthrough of a game is a couple hours, tops, then replaying it multiple times isn’t a tremendous commitment.)

      • derbefrier says:

        well yeah that’s how point and click adventure games have worked since forever.

        • Risingson says:

          NO. And I’m kind of very annoyed of what you people have been saying about The Walking Dead, a nice interactive story with a great style but, by far, the most simplistic of Telltale games in design AND in its depth.

          But as I have been told that previous Telltale games didn’t have good design before or depth, I am beginning to think that a) adventure games are only well considered when they are stripped of their elements and b) Walking Dead is considered as good storytelling for its lack of depth, for being so a to b, for lacking any good sarcasm or social commentary apart from the very obvious one (everything in this series is letting opportunities of depth go by). And that the game is that well received because, being that simple, it makes people feel more intelligent.

  7. faillord_adam says:

    Tried buying Skyrim. It asked me what postage I wanted. Is this normal?

  8. Faceinstien says:

    Damit! I JUST bought Bioshock Infinite, two days ago! I knew I should have waited for a sale!

  9. Wut The Melon says:

    Also of note for those of you who enjoy the hacky ‘n’ slashy: Devil may Cry (the new one) is 40% off on Steam for the weekend. I’m not usually into hack and slash games, but I really enjoyed DmC for some reason.

  10. Deadly Habit says:

    Arma 2 Combined Ops is on sale for $7.49 on Amazon US http://www.amazon.com/Meridian4-40365ned-Operations-ArmA2-Combined/dp/B003UV8RRE
    The DLC is on sale as well.

  11. nrvsNRG says:

    Highly reccomend Gunslinger.
    With regards to how fun and satisfying the gunplay is, I would rate it up there with Bulletstorm and FEAR (the original).

    • Iceman346 says:

      I concur. The gunplay in Gunslinger is really slick and fun and even though there aren’t that many weapons I got never bored in the (admittedly at ~4h rather short) single player campaign.

      Also the storytelling is really nicely done with very good voiceacting. I can wholeheartedly recommend the game.

      • TheDreamlord says:

        I concur as well. Finished it this morning and promptly started a new game plus. Excellent shooter. The gunplay is marvelous.

        • nrvsNRG says:

          Yep, as soon as i finished the campaign i started a new game plus on the hardest difficulty.
          That, along with the arcade mode, which has created some great friends list rivalry, and i have to say its the best 15 quid i’ve spent on a game. I pre ordered it and got bound in blood free, so thats a bonus too.
          Looks gorgeous too btw.
          P.S
          Since release theyve patched in ability to change FoV.

        • Kobest says:

          I concur as well, though only tried out the demo. But heck, what a demo it was, a nice droplet from a complete adrenaline rush. Will buy the full game very soon!

  12. malkav11 says:

    It’s really astonishing how thoroughly I disagree with Lewie about most of the opinions he expresses on games in these roundups. Fortunately, the important part is that the games are cheap.

  13. strangeloup says:

    Today’s deal of the day on Steam is Morrowind Goatee Edition, and if you haven’t played it then I’m not sure if we can be friends.

    Put this on it, and it becomes all the pretty.

  14. kalirion says:

    http://groupees.com/bm8

    $1 to get:
    Primordia (Steam, DRM Free)
    Patrician IV Steam Special Edition + Rise of a Dynasty DLC (Steam)
    Slam Bolt Scrappers (Steam)
    Fairy Boom Freesia (Steam, Desura, DRM Free)
    Paranautical Activity (Desura, DRM Free)
    Radical Roach (Desura, DRM Free)
    Karateka (Steam)
    Eleusis (Desura, DRM Free)

    $5 will get the above plus:
    Blood Bowl Legendary Edition (Steam)
    Constant C (Desura, DRM Free)
    Drakensang (Steam)
    Blades of Time – Limited Edition (Steam)
    Guncraft (Desura)

    • Convolvulus says:

      Thanks for this. I nearly bought Indie Royale mainly for Primordia. Why isn’t this Groupees bundle listed in the article?

  15. frightlever says:

    Re: the Groupee’s Be Mine 8 – five bucks for Patrician 4+DLC, Primordia, Karateka, Paranautical Activity and a bunch of other stuff you probably don’t care about is a good deal, IMO.

    Paranautical Activity is HARD.

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