Okay, So Oknytt Is Not Knytt

By Adam Smith on June 13th, 2013 at 4:00 pm.

Knytt is a splendid 2d game of exploration and discovery, in which a tiny creature runs and jumps all over an alien planet. Oknytt is not. So what is it? “Oknytt is a point-and-click adventure game where the player takes the role of a small, seemingly insignificant creature, leading it through a dark world riddled with obstacles to help it find a place to belong. The game takes place in a Norse medieval world and contains a number of beings and areas inspired by Swedish folklore.” Rather than picking things up and using them, the dinky critter has four runes which bring about changes in the environment. Experimenting with their effects in each area is the only way to advance. Look! A video.

I’m not quite sure whether to expect whimsy or worrying weirdness. Perhaps both, as is often the case when creatures and themes are extracted from the lore of folk.

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12 Comments »

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  1. Gizoku says:

    No main character has ever been “seemingly insignificant” simply by virtue of being the main character of the game. Except for something like Papers, Please.

    In all seriousness though this looks very interesting, I’m a big fan of norse/scandinavian mythology.

    And you didn’t close those quotation marks by the way.

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    RedViv says:

    Has been a bit since I had a game for the “Mother and Me” list. Refreshing.

  3. Isair says:

    I can’t figure out if Adam’s aware of the pun or not (for those who don’t know, o- is the Swedish equivalent of un-).

    Edit: nevermind. Missed the tags.

    • Post-Internet Syndrome says:

      The actual meaning of the two words are not opposites though. Knytt are small supernatural beings, and oknytt are small supernatural beings that might be evil.

      • Stick says:

        I thought “dinky critter” was a pretty good translation. :)

  4. squareking says:

    Btw, if you haven’t played Knytt, you must. It’s one of my favorite games of all time. It could be yours, too.

  5. JeCa says:

    Ah, Nifflas. How I love seeing a game developer be able to sustain himself on the stuff he seems to really just want to create. Even though I wasn’t overly impressed with NightSky, everything else I’ve played by him has been great, so if the pointing and clicking in this turns out to be decent I’ll most likely get it.

    Also, if someone enjoyed the atmosphere of knytt I highly recommend downloading Within a Deep Forest for a rainy day. I’d summarise it as a combination of Knytt and VVVVVV, if that makes any sense ;)

    • Harrington says:

      Er. This isn’t actually a Nifflas game. Different development team.

  6. Valvarexart says:

    Does anyone else immediately think of LOOM? The rune system seems very reminiscent of the distaff, but of course it is the setting that catches me… I am saying this because LOOM was the best game ever made, and if anyone makes something even remotely similar it is immediately bound to be amazing.

    • Shazbut says:

      It actually didn’t remind me of Loom, but I wanted to respond because I also love that game deeply and many years ago I used to lie in bed and fantasise about a sequel.

      In my fantasies, the graphics were cutting edge, and the opening sequence followed a group of flying swans over the landscape to the tune of Waltz of the Flowers.

      • Emeraude says:

        +1 Love for Loom.

        One of those games I consider essential part of any proper gaming DNA.
        Beautiful design.

        • Noviere says:

          Also loved Loom. The game itself wasn’t very challenging — I finished it the day after I got it for Christmas, and I was only 12 or so. But the story, setting, and music just really captured my imagination. I remember listening to the audio cassette that came with it that told the story leading up to the game, and just being enthralled.