PES 2014 Features Headbonk! Tech & F.A.R.T.S, I Think

By John Walker on June 13th, 2013 at 2:00 pm.

They've likely won something!

Foot-to-ball Game C is releasing its annual update at a point in the future, alongside Foot-to-ball Game B and Foot-to-ball Game A.

Sometimes PES is better than FIFA, and sometimes FIFA is better than PES. I lose track, but I imagine there are people who get cross with the people who think one is better than the one they think is better. But what I can tell you is that Pro Evo Soccerball 2014 is going to feature Trueball Tech and M.A.S.S. Features!

This is their ludicrous way of saying the next iteration of the game is in a new engine. Trueball is, well, the ball moving around as people kick it. MASS is Motion Animation Stability System, which manages to be both tautological and oxymoronic at once! Which is a good effort. It’s a system for calculating bodily contact, which sounds rather impressive, if entirely unnecessary. Look, you can see it all in action in a way that you’ll never actually see when playing the game, which will be top-down like always.

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48 Comments »

  1. BenLeng says:

    They still need better hair simulation for that perfect Mario-Gomez-experience.

  2. SooSiaal says:

    Looks like that MASS stuff failed at 1:09, 2 players colliding yet they don’t fall in an overly dramatic way

  3. Radiant says:

    All these technological advances are fantastic.

    Trueball, Wide Angle New Quality System, Curling Overtly Calculated Kick Shaking, Ball Locks Holding, Master Baiting Leagues… all’a dat.

  4. MOKKA says:

    The most important question (as always when a new Football game comes out): Is it going to be as good as PES6?

  5. Iamerror says:

    No idea if it will play well, but they’ve certainly nailed the animations this year :
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Rpi2TxpbEc

    It looks considerably more fluid and ‘realistic’ than the robotic videos of FIFA 14.

    • JamesTheNumberless says:

      But can it accurately depict a Peter Crouch goal celebration? (Not that the need to do so is likely to arise very often in 2014)

    • Moni says:

      The animations do flow a lot better, certainly compared to last year.

      Though, I’m disappointed that the new animation system hasn’t introduced hilarious glitches like FIFA’s new animation system did.

    • djim says:

      It looked better on the videos last year too, but then the games came out and PES was the robotic one.

  6. Stevostin says:

    Well, at least the music makes it enjoyable.

  7. Uthred says:

    “Which is a good effort. It’s a system for calculating bodily contact, which sounds rather impressive, if entirely unnecessary.” How is it unnecessary? Despite your clear disdain for the sport presumably by cultural osmosis at least you would be aware that footballers do come into contact with each other and that said contact is often well, rather important, to the outcome of said clash?

  8. wodin says:

    Top down? Who plays foot to ball games top down these days? Poor John living in the days of sensible soccer and kick off which where the bestest greatest football games ever made..I even loved the sensi soccer football manager game or was it part of the game..can’t remember.

    The first football game I owned was a manager game on cassette..with stick men that didn’t move only the leg..the ball pinged around and eventually you knew the ball routine if it was going to be a goal or not..still loved it. Had it on the BBCB.

    • JamesTheNumberless says:

      Ah, the classic Football Manager, had it on the speccy. SWOS is the game you’re thinking of that was Sensi with management aspects, it’s available right now on gog, complete with a world full of players from 1997.

    • fish99 says:

      Kick Off 2 Extra Time is still the best football game ever made. It was so much quicker and more exciting than these modern 3D versions, and the ball didn’t just stick to the player.

      • JamesTheNumberless says:

        SWOS gets my vote – it was a little bit easier to control the ball (no need to trap it) but still not a given when changing direction rapidly – not for your average player – it was also no less fast and frantic than Kick Off but that much more charming and approachable. True, there wasn’t a lot of variation in the goals you could score but it was a great football based action game, rather than trying to be a sim. It wasn’t really football at all, in the same sense that table football isn’t football. However, nothing in the present generation of multiplayer gaming beats a 4-player FIFA session :)

  9. anark10n says:

    I can’t be the only one that sees the redundancy of making a game about a game

    • sinister agent says:

      Yeah, I always have 30 or so people just hanging around on my back garden football pitch waiting to play a match anytime I feel like it.

      • anark10n says:

        Yeah, alright, I get what you’re trying to say, but football can be played with less than that many people, (quite a lot less), so exactly what is so appealing about these particular games beyond the amount of people involved?

    • JamesTheNumberless says:

      It’s kind of similar to why you play a war game instead of just going and joining the army. Or why you play Minecraft instead of just going on a hiking trip with a shovel.

      Having a waterlogged lump of plastic booted at your face on a freezing cold day and then having to run 50 yards only to be kicked in the shins by someone twice your size, and then getting shouted at for it, is the reality of football. And that’s not fun. Football video games on the other hand, are fun. Especially the shouting. And nobody has to get grass stains on their teeth.

      • anark10n says:

        You can’t compare war games to the real thing, in any meaningful sense, because in the real world, it’s not a game. Minecraft? Well, try doing the same things you in Minecraft in the real world and then maybe your point will have more to it.

        So is your point here is that you want all the fun, and none of the consequences(such as there are; honestly, how are you playing that you even end up with grass in your teeth)? An understandable point, I guess, but not to a degree that I still see the appeal of a video game over physically playing it.

        • JamesTheNumberless says:

          I don’t doubt that playing real footie is great if you’re any good at it, but the majority of people can’t do the things in real football that they can do in football games, certainly not at the same level and in the same context. Just as the average soldier isn’t a hero who can take on a whole army, and the average weekend camper isn’t going to go building a fort with a working drawbridge from sticks they find in the woods.

          Football games let us play a fantasy version of football (beyond the one we played in the school playground “I’m Gazza!”, “No *I’m* Gazza!”). There isn’t a single football game that is realistic. The pace is faster, the games are shorter, you control more than just one player and you have a tactical overview. Plus, nobody has to go in goal because the computer does that bit for you.

          But I’m not trying to argue that football video games are only for people who can’t play the real thing. As I’ve said elsewhere, football games are really “football based” games. Think of table football, just because it’s based on football doesn’t mean that playing it has to be anything like playing real football and doesn’t make the people who enjoy real football any less likely to want to play it or enjoy it. It’s well known, for instance, that many top level footballers in England actually do play football video games in their spare time.

          • anark10n says:

            Ok, I begin to see your point, I’ll get to it in a bit. First though, you’re still comparing war games and something like Minecraft. In the case of war games: these things in real life, are not fun, hence why I think the comparison is bad one. The consequences go far beyond the loss of your own life were you to fail in it. Minecraft; the possibilities in Minecraft cannot be found in the real world, no matter the resources you have access to.

            So, on to your points. Putting in terms of table football it does begin to make sense to me; but then, table football is so far removed from the real thing that it can be thought something entirely different, seeing as the similarities are merely cosmetic. Sport games, in general, try to emulate the sport exactly, following the exact same rule set and nuances. There is where I’m seeing the redundancy in these things. I understand well that not everyone that plays these games will be able to do these things, a valid point, as it holds for any kind of game that anyone cares to play; but now, its to achieve something that can be achieved given the requisites for these things, and I do rather think that makes it sort of mundane, I guess.

            Oh, and sorry for my opening statement, I could have stated my point better rather than just tossing my opinion out there like I’m doing everyone a favour by doing so.

          • JamesTheNumberless says:

            I like thinking about stuff and your points are making me think so it’s all good.

            I also think I wrote too much. The point I hope we can agree on is that current games based on real life, whether they’re about war or football (and let’s forget minecraft) are fantasy versions, and abstractions of the real thing. People who play them instead of doing the real thing, are probably playing them because they’re different from the real thing, not because they’re similar. People who do both (footballers who play FIFA, soldiers who play COD) are maybe a more complicated case.

            Which I think is why it’s interesting that these games sell themselves on their “realism” (war games too.)

            But I want to go back to your original point, which was that games based on games are redundant. I think if FIFA or PES become capable of exactly simulating every nuance of the real game, with an interface that is exactly the same as playing the real game, I will agree with you completely on that point.. Unless it also let you do something like simulate playing football on the moon :)

          • anark10n says:

            Yeah, putting it like that, I can see where the appeal in this genre of games can come from. And to add to the kind of people that play these games, there are those that are physically unable to play the real thing (don’t know why I didn’t consider that), so my entire point falls apart in that context. So we can just put it down to being just me(if it had ever gone beyond being just me…)

            As for football on the moon … why isn’t this a game concept yet? =D

    • bernieH says:

      Maybe because not everyone is as skilled as Messi IRL, and find it much more enjoyable to play like that rather than shanking the ball 30 yards wide, then having to get it out of the bushes.
      Also some people can’t play real football

      • JamesTheNumberless says:

        Or having to run down the hill at the side of the school playing field to get it, and then run all the way back up the hill… Most time I ever got to spend “on the ball” actually :)

  10. sinister agent says:

    I miss football games that were fun. Licensing and commentators and 19 kinds of pass… bleuch.

    • fish99 says:

      I hate how fake the commentary sounds in football games. “Great shot by the attacker” (because they don’t want to record the line for every player). No football commentator has ever said this.

      • JamesTheNumberless says:

        I agree that the commentary is a bit trite but the main problem nowadays is when the commentators go off on a tangent about some trivia related to player and meanwhile someone else is scoring a goal. They do actually record (almost) all the names these days. Unless you insist on picking a team from the Slovenian 3rd division you’re usually ok there.

        • bernieH says:

          This.
          I am so fed up of hearing about Portsmouth’s financial trouble and ‘how they are lucky to still be in business’ every other game I play as them.

  11. Ice-Fyre says:

    I would buy this, but they don’t seem to want to put it on Steam, greenman gaming, gamersgate, getgames, gamefly or game. And if they ever do get around to it, it will be £39.99 8 months after coming out lol

  12. nimzy says:

    I’m actually somewhat eagerly anticipating both FIFA and PES this year. It looks like FIFA came around to using something similar to PES’ custom AI “cards,” and PES looks like it’s trying to make player movement a little more realistic.

    (Okay, so maybe I’m only interested because of 4chan’s PES AI leagues, so sue me.)

  13. Screamer says:

    Foot-to-ball Game B is clearly better!

  14. Vandelay says:

    So, does PC get the proper version of PES that has all of these features or is it watered down, like FIFA always is?

    • SooSiaal says:

      This comment would have made sense pre 2011

      • Lord Custard Smingleigh says:

        Don’t be mean to time-travellers.

      • ratache says:

        Some say that this years PC iteration will not have the newest engine.

        • jayc4life says:

          It’d be a shame. Getting the new Fox engine in a retail PC game would certainly set a benchmark, and if it performs well on a lot of people’s PCs, I could see it perhaps being a test-bed of sorts to see what all kinds of machines would be capable of running a potential Metal Gear Solid 5 release.

          I haven’t got a foot-to-ball playing game since FIFA 11 on PS3, although I’m a regular foot-to-ball commander, but I might pick this up if it goes cheap, as I’ve heard alright things about 2013 on PC.

  15. aircool says:

    I stopped playing footer games when it became obvious that I would get better in game results if I just left the joypad alone and let the team AI do everything.

  16. SuicideKing says:

    M.A.S.S. EFFECT