Waits And Measures: Ending

By Adam Smith on July 16th, 2013 at 8:00 am.

Like Desktop Dungeons or DROD, Ending is a roguelike puzzle game. Presented with a character, an ‘@’ character, and a dungeon, the player must reach the exit, avoiding or destroying traps along the way. It’s a precise game. Every symbol has a function, a pattern of movement designed to perplex and punish. A single mistake is often fatal and thinking ahead is essential, creating a map in the mind tracing the position of every object during the next five or six turns. Traps shatter, as do their victims, and the sound of clattering pebble-bones rattles from the speakers. The door at the end of a level creaks its congratulations. Sterling work and entirely free on Windows, OSX and Ubuntu. Perhaps you’ll chooose to buy the 69p app to show support?

Ending was at Rezzed and I’m annoyed that I didn’t find it, play it and shake Aaron Steed’s hand because he also made Red Rogue, which is the bloodiest roguething in existence. Ending is exquisitely designed, the precision of its engineering made even more impressive by the inclusion of a ‘gauntlet’ mode. The main levels are carefully designed, poised to strike, but the ‘gauntlet’ allows randomisation to enter the dungeon, trusting in the traps to create manageable perils.

It works. In fact, it works so well that I just spent an hour playing. Oops.

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10 Comments »

  1. wu wei says:

    Picked it up on Android pretty much as a way of thanking him for Red Rogue, but found it compelling enough to lose quite a few bus trips to it. Great stuff.

  2. Snids says:

    Tell him to put Red Rogue on Android! You tell him, I can’t be bothered.

  3. Lambchops says:

    Will have to give this a go, I always end up getting sucked into this sort of thing.

  4. Quasar says:

    After spending about half an hour on this at Rezzed, I had to ask myself – Why was nobody else playing this? It’s brilliant, and the noise your enemies make when you smash them into tiny bits is indescribably satisfying.

  5. b0rsuk says:

    “Like Desktop Dungeons or DROD, Ending is a roguelike puzzle game. ”

    Only if by “DROD is a roguelike game” you mean “DROD isn’t a roguelike game”. DROD has 0 randomness. You may as well call Boulder Dash a roguelike. No, it’s not turn-based, but neither is Dwarf Fortress.

  6. princec says:

    I bought this game a few days ago – and it really is great. A perfect phone game.

  7. Fenix says:

    I remember playing a game with these exact graphics/gameplay when Porpentine linked to it a while back on Live Free, Play Hard, but it didn’t have levels and was just endless and entirely randomly generated.

    • MondSemmel says:

      The work-in-progress version of the game was available on tigsource a few months before this. I think I also found it via that Porpentine link, but then the game already had the endless mode and the puzzle mode; there was just a bug where clicking on the game screen for the first time made you skip straight to a game mode, i.e. you never really noticed that there was, in fact, a menu with different game options.

  8. AlienMind says:

    Why is it roguelike? Does it steal… Honestly, that buzzword sucks, they could have at least chosen a word who sounds like it has anything to do with generated randomized.