[Look At] The [Adventurezator] [Trailer]

By Craig Pearson on July 19th, 2013 at 8:00 am.

Nope. No idea.
There are very good reasons why adventure games are not emergent. If the colander isn’t found under the pig then there will be no way to strain the pasta to feed to the the astronaut that will make him bloated so he’ll adjust the orbit of the moon so that the waves are choppier and the lady on the boat leaves her door unlocked because she needs to go hurl. It just won’t happen. But that’s part of a problem with the mechanics of adventure games that Adventurezator: When Pigs Fly is attempting to solve. It’s an adventure puzzle game that emergently generates puzzles with solveable solutions. What I’m saying is: if you have a sieve instead of a colander, that’ll work just as well. In addition to that, players can easily build their own puzzles. The Kickstarter elevator pitch, in an actual elevator, is below.

It’s rather neat. Levels are built with systems rather than single-choice solutions. So a mug is a chalice is a cup, and all three will work if you need something to tote water about. Hooray!

The biggest problem I have is that they keep showing simple solutions. I get that there’s a need to make things seem slick and easy to use, but show me something more complex and interesting. I want to see what the game’s capable of at a higher level in addition to how simple it is.

At least the editor walkthrough below shows there’s plenty of variables to mess with, and even the time of day could have an effect on something you build. It’s a step in the right direction. More, please.

It’s also on Greenlight, begging for an upvote.

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17 Comments »

  1. Spacewalk says:

    Ah, so that’s how you complete the RPS text adventure.

  2. petrucio says:

    Petrucio, Project Lead here, ready to step in and settle all your questions!

    “The biggest problem I have is that they keep showing simple solutions.”

    Yeah, that’s because everything we are showing in the videos is stuff we have implemented and working, and also to keep videos shorter – no slights of hand here.

    “Show me something more complex and interesting. I want to see what the game’s capable of at a higher level in addition to how simple it is”

    I believe you have not yet read the Update #2 posted recently – we go into gritty details of how the NPCs will behave, and I’m pretty sure it’s got plenty of information there for you to start thinking about more complex and higher level stuff that could be done with it.

    “More, please”

    Ask and you shall receive! I’ll start working on update #3 tomorrow, showing the last major feature we haven’t touched on yet, which is crafting, and then update #4 will hopefully go out on Sunday, putting it all together and show a more complex chain of interaction that would be present in a real more advenced level.

    So stay tuned!

    I’ll be around to answer more questions you fellas have, here or in the comments section of the Kickstarer!

    • StranaMente says:

      Lovely art design and I can see interesting possibilities, also I appreciate that you came in here to respond to the questions and doubts.
      I’m going to check the ks right now.

    • Lamb Chop says:

      Is a slight of hand when you flip someone the bird? I’m glad you’re not doing that.

  3. frightlever says:

    I’m not convinced that’s the correct use of the term “emergent”. Randomly-generated does not equate to emergent.

    Edit: right. I’ve thought about it. While I don’t think you can make an emergent game, you can definitely make an adventure game which leads to emergent gameplay. That I want to see.

  4. bravekarma says:

    So it looks like the campaign is a proper adventure game with a narrative and stuff, while the other part is more like a randomized puzzle game, where the gameplay is shared between them. Not a bad idea.

    • petrucio says:

      The other part is still adventure games, not a puzzle games (although adventure games could be viewed as puzzle games, but that’s not the point).

      And it’s certainly not random – it’s either created by you, or other players like you.

  5. Viroso says:

    Wouldn’t Scribblenauts be kind of an emergent adventure game?

    • petrucio says:

      Kind of, yeah. But when I say emergent for the Adventurezator, is more from the point of view of the player designing the level: he could for instance create a level with the single objective “Bob – must – consume – a fish” that could be solved in 30 seconds, or create another level with exactly the same objective, that would take half an hour to complete, because there are a lot of stuff in the level between Bob and said potion. The gameplay for the level emerges from stuff that you put into the level, without anything actualy having to be scripted. Scribblenauts is emergent from the point of view of each individual puzzle – but yeah, I would call it emergent too, in a very different way.

  6. Hodge says:

    Levels are built with systems rather than single-choice solutions. So a mug is a chalice is a cup, and all three will work if you need something to tote water about. Hooray!

    Which raises the question of why adventure games haven’t been doing this for the last two decades?

    • Shuck says:

      “why adventure games haven’t been doing this for the last two decades?”
      Because once you get beyond simple things like “these all hold water,” it gets tricky, quickly. The appeal of adventure games (from a developer perspective) is that on a technical level, the basic mechanics of the game itself are about as simple as it gets. (Plus, you know, if you can’t extend gameplay times out artificially with arbitrary puzzles, how do you pad the game?)

    • petrucio says:

      Because doing things this way not only is much harder to develop each type of mechanic, but it also does limit what you can do on your adventure.

      For example, in our campaign, one idea we had was “Oh, wouldn’t it be cool if he threw up after eating that?”, to which my response was “Sure it would. In this instance, for this case. Can we make this behaviour apply everytime someone eats that?”, to which the answer was obviously no.

      A normal adventure game is trying to tell a story, and he can very well script someone to throw up after eating something. I’m trying to allow players to do anything, and as such, I need to limit crazy behaviors from objects.

      It’s two very different things, but your question is indeed more interesting than at first it may seems.

      I do hope that my game ends up influencing the adventure game genre in a way that some of these generic interactions do end up implemented in future adventure games, making them a bit more open-ended, like Deux Ex did for action games many years ago.

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