Survey: Babies Most Likely To Be Eaten By GTA V

By John Walker on December 19th, 2013 at 11:00 am.

Tis the season for it. As people who do important things get distracted by baubles, the press starts to look for anything to fill their pages, and canny PR companies begin sending out headline-filling anythings to fill the void. So it is that today we’ve been contacted by babies.co.uk to let us know that mums (just mums, apparently) are most scared of their precious ones playing GTA V. Even more so than Killzone Something and Dead Rising: Dead In The Title.

Managing Director of babies.co.uk, James MacFarlane, explained the situation:

“It became apparent that our users were very scared of the level of realism found in a game like Grand Theft Auto V. While it is hard to see a child relating with a zombie first person shooter, as is the case in some of the other games in the poll, parents are clearly concerned that a game which rewards murder, arson, torture and theft in the way that GTA V does, might make the same actions in real life more acceptable.”

Let’s not get into the discussions over the validity of such fears, because there just isn’t useful data to say definitely either way. (Beyond the population-wide anecdotal evidence that there are fewer violent crimes taking place now than 30 years ago, perhaps pointing away from a murder pandemic created by videogames, we really don’t know if such depictions cause children to change their views.) But instead let’s focus on the fact that none of these games is aimed at children. Nor indeed babies. In fact, every game in their list of games they hadn’t heard of before being asked about them comes with a big fat red BBFC “18″ sticker on the front of the box.

The press release goes on to point out that 80% of their site’s users accept that games are an appropriate part of child’s life. However, the website version of the story hurriedly moves on from this topic to emphasise just how awful games really are. In fact, the web story is ghastly from top to bottom. Sub-headings like “Appropriate Games?” don’t feature anything about appropriate games, while “Help for our Children?” appears above a paragraph that explains how parents are concerned about Killzone.

I understand the story. It’s designed to get a mention (and thus a plug for the site) in the Mail and the Telegraph, where the fears of parents were likely discovered in the first place, as the self-enforcing circle of fear and profit continues. But as inevitable as it might be, it still is of concern.

There is undeniably an issue with parents not seeming to understand that BBFC game ratings count for games as well as films. But it’s not one that’s going to move forward by reinforcing the notion that games are this invasive pervasive danger in their children’s lives. Fear doesn’t breed understanding, just more fear.

As I rather rudely replied to the press release, have they similarly surveyed about which cars they don’t want their children to drive this Christmas? Which alcoholic beverages they least want to find in their child’s stocking? Why is what adult entertainment they don’t want their children to have even a question being asked? This could be a constructive conversation. Why can’t this be a survey of the games parents most hope their children receive this Christmas? With an audience of parents, it would seem far more sensible and productive for the question to have been reversed, to ask whether they would prefer their son or daughter receive Scribblenauts or Lego Marvel this Christmas. The results would then prove useful, a helpful buyer’s guide for their users, and help point parents away from the grown up games in favour of the appropriate products.

By framing this debate constantly as one of which game is most likely to turn your child into a raging psychopath, we simply reinforce the idea that games are a negative presence in children’s lives, and to be scared of. (And it really doesn’t make any difference if you tack on a caveat at the end about how parents accept gaming will play a part in their child’s life, once the damage is already done.) The equivalent survey for DVDs would be preposterous, suggesting that the only choices out there for kids this holiday are Saw VI and Insidious 2, maintaining a denial of Peppa Pig and Cloudy With A Chance Of Meatballs 2. So why is this angle taken with gaming? Because headlines. That’s purely it. Run this survey and your site gets a plug in the papers. Run something constructive, asking whether you’d like to see Disney Infinity or Pikmin 3 in your kid’s stocking, and it’ll get entirely ignored by the mainstream press.

But you might make a useful difference. You might help this conversation to move on past the initial grunting confusion, and start to give parents some confidence when deciding what games they want their children to play.

Top image by Kyle Flood.

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156 Comments »

  1. LionsPhil says:

    and canny PR companies begin sending out headline-filling anythings to fill the void

    …and RPS are happy to co-operate?

    • apocraphyn says:

      Apparently so! Going to such lengths as to create a headline pertaining to a game which hasn’t even been announced for the PC on a “PC gaming” website, too!

      For shame, John. Bad show.

    • Gap Gen says:

      Yeah, I was wondering about this. If it is just a PR company trying to get eyeballs by saying any old shit, as RPS suggests. (and it’s highly probable that those poll figures are just made up by some underpaid entry-level worker) then why bother responding to them? Or is this just pre-empting the newspapers that will obviously reprint it because newspapers only really exist to provide confirmation bias to their readers.

      One thing that RPS could do is link to a screenshot of the press release rather than the site; I’d rather not succumb to naked clickbait if I can help it.

      • Viroso says:

        I think it isn’t necessarily and specifically about the press release but about what it means for the UK media, and UK parents, who fail to recognize that video games can be adult entertainment. The press release was just the hook.

    • John Walker says:

      Yes, in criticising this, and going on to make an argument for how the subject should better be approached, I needed to acknowledge it exists. You got me!

  2. strangeloup says:

    I’m not sure if it’s just “because headlines”, though there’s clearly an element of sensationalism; I’ve seen lackwit parents buy GTA and CoD and the like for their clearly underage children (in some cases maybe 11 or 12) time and time again in Game.

    • Grygus says:

      Yeah, the real problem is the notion that videogames are children’s toys.

      • strangeloup says:

        And also that CoD is rubbish.

      • TechnicalBen says:

        No, it’s many reasons. Not sure about America, but even then, it’s less that people think “games are for children” and more that “I don’t need to check entertainment for children”.

        Either they believe the child, think everything in a store is for children, or think everything on Xbox/PS is for kids. That level of logical dissonance, has to originate from somewhere.

        It might be they are afraid of tantrums, afraid the kids will not be cool/have a great childhood. Or just they cannot be bothered.

        • Richard Beer says:

          Actually it really IS that. Gyrus is right. Parents of a certain age literally have no idea what videogames are. They think they are children’s toys. My father-in-law once bought GTA IV for his 5-year old grandson because he thought it was some kind of driving game for kids. Fortunately there were more savvy adults in the house who swiftly educated him before it was unwrapped.

          But this is the problem. If games had the profile of movies, i.e. people understood they were just a MEDIUM and could be designed to appeal to everyone from babies to OAPs, then they would never assume Killzone: Death of Duty was aimed at minors.

          As it is, they do. Hence, game makers are evil people seeking to profit from turning kids into psychopaths.

          • Shuck says:

            It doesn’t help that even supposedly “mature” games usually have juvenile, sometimes even downright childish, sensibilities. So even if you got to see some footage of the game in action, it wouldn’t necessarily disabuse you of the notion that all games are aimed at children.

          • TechnicalBen says:

            True. But I was getting at asking why they don’t know. Or why they think games are for kids.
            Why was your father-in-law complicit with buyign something and not checking what it was? Was it a false sense of security, that everything we buy is already vetted? Or that it’s too much hard work to check before buying?
            One quick glance at the box would be a giveaway no? I mean, who buys such videos for 5 year olds, and most videos reflect the box art. It’s the same for games, so I’m confused over how it happens…
            http://webmuch.com/gta-5-box-art-revealed/

            The underlying reason is more important than the end result or symptom IMO.

          • scatterbrainless says:

            While this is true, it doesn’t account for the fact that these moral panics and condemnation of new media have a much longer history than simply videogames (movies, television, jazz, rock and roll all spring to mind). There is, in almost every generation, a tendency to externalize fears by attributing it to the new or the different. Solving the problem as it specifically applies to video games is one thing, trying to attenuate the hold that such moral panics have on society is a much broader issue.

      • Kubrick Stare Nun says:

        The problem is that ‘concerned parents’ need a new bogeyman so they will leave video games alone. I vote for smartphones and social networks.

    • Bull0 says:

      In fact I used to rely on it when I was 11 or 12. I can still remember sending my mum in when the bloke at Game wouldn’t sell me Manhunt. I was 17 or something.

    • Werthead says:

      Back in the day when I was working in Beatties (remember them?), I had parents of quite small kids (7-8, maybe even a tad younger) trying to buy GRAND THEFT AUTO 2 and getting quite irate when I refused to sell it to them on pain of being fined and fired.

    • Lusketrollet says:

      Yeah, strangeloup. I’m sure those children must have been traumatized for life. They now probably think murdering hookers is okay.

      Because that’s how children work, right?

      • LVX156 says:

        Am I the only one old enough to remember a time when there were no ratings for games? When I got my first computer (in 1987 or 1988) I played anything and everything. Hell, I taught myself English by playing Wasteland on my C64 and Police Quest and Leisure Suit Larry on my friend’s PC. Somehow most of my generation still managed to grow up to become somewhat normal people.

        • Press X to Gary Busey says:

          Just the ones that didn’t listen to rock music, right?

      • scatterbrainless says:

        Of course, children are just blank surfaces to mindlessly reproduce whatever input they receive, without any guiding principles or personal values. I mean, where would they receive such values and principles from?

    • Drayk says:

      As a gamer and a Dad I really have a problem with parents who are letting young kids playing game unsuited for them? In a bus 3-4 weeks ago I started talking to the Mom of a 5-6 yo who was already playing GTV a his dad’s place.

      Call me a biggot but I was really annoyed by that. Sure, I’ve played lots of games I was to young to play according to the ratings, but I also believe there should be a progression in the games you’re playing. And the graphic depictions of violence we have nowadays as nothing to do with what it was 20 years ago. (Doom 1 was PEGI 16) I must have been 13 or something when I started playing it and i don’t feel like it has left any psychic scars on my mind. But I am glad I started games by playing less violent games like adventure games and platformers. That’s what I am planning to do with my kids, let them grow with the medium.

      • LVX156 says:

        Everyone is different. I begged and pleaded with my parents to let me watch Alien when I was about 11, and they eventually relented but told me that if I got nightmares, it was my own fault. I didn’t get nightmares, but I discovered a movie that is still in my top 5, almost 25 years later. I watched Bruce Lee’s and Chuck Norris’ movies when I was even younger than that, and it didn’t scar me in any way.

        I played Barbarian and Barbarian II on my C64, and later Moonstone on my Amiga, and I wasn’t scarred by that either, anymore than children who played cops and robbers or cowboys and indians when they were kids were scarred for life.

        I taught myself to read and write wen I was about 3, so when I started school I was already reading adult books, and I wasn’t scarred by that either, no matter how much some people think that reading the word “nigger” in Huckleberry Finn would turn you into a raving racist.

        • Ich Will says:

          You did not teach yourself to read and write when you were three.

          • Groove says:

            I have to agree, teaching yourself to read at 3 is impossibly unlikely. Being taught to read and scirbble out some letters at 3 is still pretty impressive though, if that is the case then claiming it was self taught is a cheapening boast.

          • Fumarole says:

            Mowgli the Man Cub is quite resourceful.

          • LVX156 says:

            I guess I am impossibly unlikely then. My mom taught me the letters of the alphabet and a few words, but then I figured it out on my own. I know that for a fact because my mom saved a lot of the stuff I made back then, including sheets of words that I wrote by using those letter stamp things that you put on an ink pad and then press onto paper. I was writing words that she never taught me, that I picked up on my own.

            Also, read up on hyperlexia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperlexia

          • Ich Will says:

            Your mum did an awful lot more than you give her credit for – I’m not disputing that you could do the things you could do, but just that you did it without help!

          • TechnicalBen says:

            Children learn what they are involved in. For example they can learn 3 languages as easily as 1 when brought up as a child to learn the language (from very early ages).

            Same goes with maths. It’s uncommon, but some do progress very quickly and are doing algebra/calculus at 3 or 4 years old.

            We all have the ability to learn though. No doubt parents (and the mother in this case) have a massive input as well. But there are always exceptions, don’t knock them just because your experience is different.

            PS, thought I’d get a citation for you too: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_child_prodigies
            Note that computational things can appear as early as 3, but “thinking/reasoning” aspects still tend to appear just before the teens (when I guess we learn a lot more with either actual brain/growth changes or cultural/educational changes).

      • Groove says:

        I completely agree about kids of that age. Personally I think that around 11-12, when kids are entering secondary school, then pretty much all bets are off. You should still monitor what they’re doing and try to guide them but if you take too hard a line then they’ll either go around you or end up being too sheltered and will be excluded because of it.

        On the other side, if a child is around 7-8 or younger then you really should be monitoring what they’re playing. Younger than 7 then I can’t imagine a child even understanding what’s happening in GTA, for instance. I played through the Minecraft tutorial with friends kids, I think 4 and 6 years old and they really couldn’t handle the breadth of what was happening. They liked that they could find a fishing rod in a chest and hit a sheep with it, they screamed and laughed every time they fell in a hole, enjoyed when I helped them climb onto a tree and got bored half way through making a dirt house but didn’t get bored of picking flowers until they ran out of flowers. What I’m saying, is I think that a story of betrayal and murder would probably be lost on them, and they wouldn’t pass the tutorial missions in a game like GTA or CoD unless an older person was playing it with (for) them.

        • SuicideKing says:

          Well, when i was between 5 and 7, we had NFS II SE, Incoming, Tomb Raider II, FreeSpace 2, Quake II (just the demo), some random WWII turn based strategy game, MS Flight Simulator 2000, F/A-18 Korea, X-Wing vs Tie Fighter…i could manage to play them all to varying degrees, though would sort of be too scared/nervous/apprehensive to play some of them without my dad. I mean, he used to play, i used to watch.

  3. Erinduck says:

    I think a part of it might be the Grand Theft Auto Boogeyman Effect. GTA is kinda like Doom in how it’s been demonised for so long that it’s a part of the public consciousness. It’s also named after a crime outright. I’d argue that Assassin’s Creed, a game where you’re quite literally somebody who murders for a living as part of the main narrative, is a bit more “worrying,” if I could ever use such a word to describe the games in this list.

    • solidsquid says:

      I always found it funny how Doom was criticised for the demonic content of the game. The whole point is that you’re there to drive back the forces of evil and kill all the demons, surely that would be a positive thing if demons are that bad?

  4. Jonfon says:

    This year is especially bad with the Next Gen hype and my nephews all wanting/getting PS4s. There is 1 decent, suitable games for the ‘around 10s’ for the ‘next-gen’ consoles out at the moment : Lego Marvel. The rest is either cack or not suitable at all.

    Thankfully my annual ‘those kids shouldn’t be playing that’ rant worked though (“Are you going to let him watch Scarface later as well?”), my mum bought them Lego Marvel for the PS4 (my nephews birthday is early December).

    I went and both some “old-gen” games for them instead

    • Erinduck says:

      Be fair, there’s also Knack!

      You know, if you can’t find any coal.

      • Ich Will says:

        Talking of knack, in the UK, a game can be given a higher age rating on the basis that it may be so bad that it’s too expensive a mistake for a child to make!!!

    • Werthead says:

      The new SKYLANDERS, SWAP FORCE, is also available on the next gen consoles (I’ve got a copy on PS4 upstairs waiting to be wrapped right now). MINECRAFT is also on its way to both PS4 and XB1 in the next few months.

    • Lusketrollet says:

      Oh, wow, Jonfon. I am so fucking glad you were never my parent.

      People like you fucking depress me.

      • aerozol says:

        I’d be proud to have you as my pop Jonfon don’t worry :)

        • Jonfon says:

          Did I lose a son AND gain a son in my absence? Jaysis. Although im not too upset about the one I lost to be fair.

          I don’t think my nephews should be playing gta 5. On tge other hand I always have a list of great games I’ll buy them instead. Eg lego marvel or rayman legends.

      • John Walker says:

        And people with your attitude are the reason adult games will be increasingly censored and spoiled for adults.

    • LVX156 says:

      I watched the tv-series V when I was 10. I watched Aliens at 11. I watched Scarface at 11 or 12. I watched all kinds of martial arts movies with my dad when I was no older than 7. And you know what? I’m not a hooligan, my life hasn’t been ruined, I have no problem differentiating between fake violence and real violence.

      If you teach your kids what is right and wrong a video game will have no impact whatsoever, neither will a movie. This debate is so stupid, and it has been going on ever since the Vienna waltz was invented, and the elderly were appalled that the kids would be dancing so close to each other, it would obviously ruin society. We’ve heard the same thing about jazz, about rock’n roll, about comic books, about violent movies, about heavy metal and now about video games.

      • guygodbois00 says:

        Pretty much this. “It’s not us, it’s the TV and games and whatnot.”And there ARE really great games out there to be played by grownups and children together. Especially in this day and age.

        • LVX156 says:

          Absolutely. I think this is a problem that will sort itself out over time. The median age of a gamer today is something like 35 years, so even now most parents have experience with gaming, and that will only increase over time. It’s always the people who aren’t familiar with comic books/heavy metal/violent movies/video games who are running around with their hands in the air shouting “THE END IS NIGH!”. When a vast majority of parents are people who grew up gaming, this won’t be a problem anymore.

  5. MuscleHorse says:

    Whoops, I knew something was wrong while I was buying Killzone: Murder Death Murder Gun for my three year old Monsters Inc obsessive. Thanks John!

  6. Viroso says:

    Once in Scribblenauts there was a guy crying by his dead wife and he wanted to be reunited with her, so I summoned Jesus to revive the wife but instead Jesus turned the husband into wine, thus killing him, their immortal souls were reunited in heaven, earning me the Starite.

    Sure, Jesus was acquired from the workshop, but still, where’s your GTAV now?

    • LionsPhil says:

      On I think the same level, there was a guy complaining that he wasn’t getting a tan, so I made him a hot sun.

      The hot sun burnt his flesh, then he popped into a variety of leathers and cooked meats.

      I got the Starite fragment.

      • strangeloup says:

        I’m curious as to which version this is, because you’re making it sound like Scribblenauts: By Any Means Necessary.

        And that sounds awesome.

        • LionsPhil says:

          Unlimited. You can take a surprisingly, uh, direct approach in a lot of cases if you want to.

          I suppose it makes you into a bit of a horrible cursed monkey hand, or spiteful god, very easily. A lot of the time you don’t even have to be trying.

          …I dread to think what small boys would do with it, given the childish propensity for unrestrained malice. (But not in a “protect the children” way, natch.)

          • Timberwolf says:

            The last time I played Scribblenauts Unlimited was with a group of friends, and puzzling rapidly devolved to trying to solve every problem by the application of an “enormous thorium beard”. It is surprising how many of the puzzles count everything in the vicinity being violently radioactive, dead, on fire or all three at once as a “solved” state.

          • Lord Custard Smingleigh says:

            I endorse solving problems with an enormous thorium beard: The beard that burns flesh, yet does not consume itself.

          • hotmaildidntwork says:

            I now find myself wondering “Was the paw in The Monkey’s Paw truly malevolent or merely another victim of its own power, seeking always to bring happiness and joy to its owners but through twisted fate unable to cause anything but grief and horror?”

            If only we could *talk* to the paws….

        • Viroso says:

          You have two ways of playing it. The quickest, obvious solution or the “by any means necessary”, “cursed monkey”, “spiteful god” kind of way.

          In fact, every time I played I made sure I would add the “legless flying” adjectives to me and put a turban on my head. I was the evil genie screwing up everyone’s wishes.

          Oh and funny thing too, one guy wanted me to give him stuff to create constellations. So like, a crab for Cancer, a ram for Aries. Then I gave him a gamer and he gave me Virgo.

          • Gap Gen says:

            Ha. My essential items were a very fast jetpack and a frog costume.

      • The Random One says:

        That Jesus seems non-biblical-canon. Bible!Jesus only turns water into wine, not… whatever is in front of him.

        Also, I did the same thing LionsPhil did. Even worse, because I made a huge hot sun.

        • Timberwolf says:

          The non-canon adventures of Jesus. Jesus fan fiction.

        • Sian says:

          We’re, what, 70 % water? The rest he turns to glass for the bottle.

        • darkChozo says:

          I like to imagine that Jesus had a wine Midas Touch thing going on. Cursed never to touch anything again lest it be turned to alcoholic beverage.

    • Jonfon says:

      The first thing my 3 year old always wants in Scribblenauts (after DIGGER!) is Giant Werewolf (which always ends up eating whatever charming scene the 6 year old has set up).

      At least the 6 year old knows how to spell werewolf now, I guess.

      • strangeloup says:

        I greatly approve of your offspring. I spent a while in the old, pre-adjectives Scribblenauts trying to solve everything with werewolves, which surprisingly enough had a non-zero success rate.

  7. DrStrangeLug says:

    There is a comment section on that article. If you thing the author is a tit for doing then then tell him.

  8. Ilinx says:

    Are they not all PEGI age ratings nowadays? Maybe this has become the source of confusion for these poor babies.

    • GameCat says:

      I can’t speak for other countries, but here in Poland PEGI is just information for buyer and theoretically you can buy an 18+ game when you’re 13 years old. Of course shopkeeper can refuse to sell GTA5 to kids, but if he will sell it, you can’t charge him like for selling alcohol or cigarettes to underage person.

      Most of parents doesn’t even know what PEGI is.

  9. Matt Thrower says:

    It’s PEPPA Pig, John. Do your research, for Christ’s sake ;)

  10. TomA says:

    It boils down to parenting but it’s difficult, I’m 23 and I remember not even being allowed to sit in the same room when my dad played Doom or Resident Evil on the PS1 at home, which is funny now I look back on it. Obviously they made steps to limit what I was watching/playing but I was going to friends houses after school or staying at a cousins and watching films like Robocop and Terminator, playing whatever I wanted and it never did me any harm… unlike my annoying neighbour, he’ll get what’s coming to him when I travel back in time and stop him from ever being born.

    • Lusketrollet says:

      Thus far, TomA occurs to me as the single most sensible person in this comments-section.

      • TomA says:

        Thank you, I think if you raise your kids right in other aspects of life and teach them proper lessons and social etiquette, they’re not going to run around school uppercutting other kids just because they’ve played a bit of Mortal Kombat. They’ll already know not to connect the experience with reality and hitting people is wrong because you’ve made this clear from an early age.

  11. Tony M says:

    Killzone, COD and Assassins Creed? Maybe parents are just worried about their kids developing bad taste in games.

    • Groove says:

      That was my first thought actually. I’m not letting my daughter play any of these games! But not for the reason they’re expecting…

  12. TechnicalBen says:

    “Let’s not get into the discussions over the validity of such fears, because there just isn’t useful data to say definitely either way.”

    Bring someone up in a world where lions fight “criminals” or slaves in a Coliseum, and they will think that kind of thing is “normal”. They are not the ones fighting in the Coliseum, but why do they cheer on if they are not involved and effected by it?

    It might only be a self re-enforcement of violent tendencies. However, it still has an effect. Individually we can choose to re-enforce such tendencies or avoid it. So while I’m not commenting on if any law should be changed, I totally understand some peoples desire to avoid such entertainment.

    A perfect example is, there are still some subjects in movies/games/art/etc that are still avoided, rightly so. Because they are so horrible, and they effect us strongly.

    It may not cause people to go on violent sprees, but it certainly has an effect. Culture might play a larger aspect than the media it’s self, but separating the two is as difficult as separating football from crowd violence. Not taking note of even possible dangers is a scary side to take.

  13. Nevard says:

    Why don’t they just not buy GTA V for their kids then

    • Jonfon says:

      Because Santa is a strange and twisted supernatural entity and the parents have no defense against his capricious whims.

      • aldo_14 says:

        Santa is an anagram of Satan. True fact, that.

        • Groove says:

          And Mother-in-Law is an anagram of Woman Hitler.

          In fairness I like my mother-in-law, even if she is disorganised and unable to follow instructions she’s otherwise lovely.

    • TechnicalBen says:

      Yes. This. But educating the parents and population might bring them to the level of not buying these papers/visiting these websites. They run on fear and noneducational. :/

      PS, that and possibly people don’t check with family before presents are got (as mentioned above).
      Worse one I saw in my family was a distant relative buying a “kids comic” for an 8 year old, that turned out to be one where the hero gets all chopped up and the images to go with it. Not quite fitting, a Beano would have been better. :P

    • Faxanadu says:

      This is where all discussion should END.

      There will ALWAYS be games with hardcore material. It will NEVER GO AWAY, it’s here to stay. So I find it absolutely demented that anyone should choose to somehow try and make GAMES change. They will not. End of.

      Find alternate methods.

  14. Rao Dao Zao says:

    My parents wouldn’t let me play violent video games when I was young.

    Then they got me Unreal Tournament for crimbo, and I am now a mass murderer.

  15. Lars Westergren says:

    That baby has some epic bawling going on. Well done, baby!

  16. Sixtoe says:

    To be honest, I got my kids New Super Mario Bros. Wii last xmas, and that’s far more likely to turn you into a blood crazed psychopath after you’ve been jumped on the head and knocked off a cliff for the 100th time.
    I’m not even exaggerating, I’ve never had to put down a controller and go for a walk before this game, because the game made me *that* angry >.<

    • Press X to Gary Busey says:

      100% true. I once let my sister’s kids borrow my copy and they had to return it just a few days later. She said it nearly made them kill each other. The same result every time I’ve played it with them when they are visiting.
      It’s pure evil. I don’t know what Nintendo were trying with that one.

  17. rustybroomhandle says:

    Also, did you guys know that playing video games can lead to deadly blood clots?

    http://www.nydailynews.com/life-style/health/playing-video-games-deadly-article-1.1546209

    • Gap Gen says:

      Playing videyal games can also lead to epic loots, fat XP stacks and all the leaderboards. At least, what’s what they tell you, but if it goes bad you can end up grinding mobs in an alleyway for gamercoins. Stick to books; at least they can only rob you of your eyesight, teach communism and catch you afire with their flammable carapaces.

    • LTK says:

      So does sitting down and reading the Bible!

  18. The First Door says:

    I couldn’t agree more with this article! I get so annoyed with places like the Mail complaining about violence in video games and ignoring the fact that it’s often just the parent’s not bothering to take even a cursory glance at the box before buying it.

    One thing though, I thought all games were now being rated by PEGI rather than the BBFC?

    • Gap Gen says:

      It’s worth pointing out that the Daily Mail is systemically awful in all instances. Not that this doesn’t mean you end up having to play whackamole with its readers, but its game coverage is no different to anything else it prints. I miss the days when it just openly supported fascism rather than openly supporting fa- OK never mind.

  19. bstard says:

    lol funny stuff. I somehow always had this impression there’s a relation between konsoles and baby’s.

    • Gap Gen says:

      Those consoles may look cold and uncaring, like black slabs of funerary holding, but in reality they will take one’s precious child and prepare them for the cruel jobless wasteland that awaits them outside the crib. Even infants in swaddling can benefit from the varied levels of crimes on offer in the epic sagas of GTA. Some parents might well claim that in order to truly prepare one’s child for the adult world one would have to get them to kneecap a rival family member for real, but things like this simply give them a leg up (pun intended, yes!) in violently maiming people in exchange for access to resources.

    • Imbecile says:

      I have to say that I tend to think that pc players who continually make out that consoles are just for kiddies, are just as bad as parents who think that all games are for children. Its an equally daft mindset.

  20. FriendlyPsicopath says:

    This is nothing new i remember seeing the same type of stuff happening in the 90′s with doom, carmagedon an the likes. It all boils down to bad lazy ,parenting . People in the majority are too freaking lazy, stupid self centered pricks with no moral fiber, unable to say a big NO to their kids and educate them right, to know with who, doing what, where their kids are, it is just too much effort, they want to not mind.
    To justify their absences and laziness these kind of people need to take the blame they have (even if it is subconsciously ) from their shoulders and blame something, in this case games.

  21. Yosharian says:

    When I was a kid (circa 1990s) there was all kinds of stuff we weren’t ‘supposed’ to see that we saw a LOT of. 18 rated movies like Terminator, porn off the internet (dialup restricted me more than anything), etc. Games are just a ‘newer’ part of that. To say that it is solely the parents’ responsibility is misleading, in my opinion. I was brought up living with my mother and visiting my father at weekends, and they were both kind and caring parents who took an interest in my life. Some of the things I was exposed to they knew about, some they didn’t (for example I watched Aliens with my dad and it scared the living shit out of me). Bottom line: if I wanted to watch or play something, I probably would have been able to do it no matter what they thought. If it was that easy for a kid growing up in the 90s, imagine how easy it is for kids now. Parents just aren’t equipped with the knowledge and the savvy to deal with the kind of methods kids can use to expose themselves to stuff, and they never will be. The sooner we accept that, the sooner we can deal seriously with this problem.

    SPOILERS FOR GTA5 FOLLOW:
    GTA5 crosses a line, in my opinion. The torture scenes are by far the worst thing I’ve seen and performed in a video game. I’m not a prude and I definitely like most violent videogames, when the violence is ‘fun’. I grew up on Doom, Quake and all kinds of violent videogames and movies. The kind of psychological violence in those scenes was not fun for me, and I felt that the ‘artistic’ statement they might have posed was lost amongst the rest of the game (similar to Far Cry 3′s attempt at an artistic statement). I honestly think GTA5 should have been refused certification.

    • Lusketrollet says:

      Ah. So we should HELP parents censor the living shit out of their children’s lives?

      • aldo_14 says:

        You think stopping a four year old see a realistically depicted evisceration is ‘censoring the living shit’?

        Well, er, your problem. I’m guessing you don’t have kids, because it changes your viewpoint quite a lot. For one thing, you try and safeguard their intellectual and emotional development; a todder doesn’t go ‘whoo’ at a fountain of blood from a dismembered neck, they are more likely to end up with panic attacks and night terrors. Christ, my daughter got borderline PTSD when my wife started going out to work in the mornings, how exactly will making her au fait with high velocity gunshot wounds help her grow as an individual?

        It’s not like this is some cherished essential part of our childhood, that we’re depriving children by not letting them play GTAV or Dead Space. And,; frankly it’s just a bit creepy to hear my 12 year old nephew raving about vast bouts of gushing blood in Ninja Gaiden Black in the same way as he used to rave about lego.

        • Yosharian says:

          I disagree. I think it’s psychological violence that is problematic, not mere gore. I watched a ton of gory shit as a kid and it never made me into a serial killer, and it also never made consider violence as ‘ok’.

          • aldo_14 says:

            Well, here’s the thing. We’re not necessarily talking about making people into serial killers; that would be an excessive extreme, and hint to psychological problems beyond anything media could create. I’d suggest that psychological horror and gore can be very much the same thing; the former can be stimulated by the latter.

            There’s no real way to know what the impact of violence in games is upon very young children, because there is no ethical way to test it. My worry is not that my daughter would grow up to be a psychopath or anything, but rather that she’d get scared (such as night terrors) and suffer from insecurities for a good portion of time. The brain is incredibly malleable at that age, and they pick up and infer things at a speed and in a way that’s pretty incomprehensible to an adult.

            In a sense we shouldn’t need ratings, but sadly history shows that people are idiots (fine for them, but bad if they have kids), so IMO we need some degree of standard setting. Because we’re talking about imagery that, I’d say, is in no way essential and arguably not even valuable to development, I think it should be considered fine to restrict.

      • Yosharian says:

        I’m saying we should question the inclusion of graphic torture scenes in what is essentially a game for young adults; ratings aside, kids play GTA as much as Call of Duty. Simply pointing the finger at parents isn’t going to SOLVE the problem.

        • hungrycookpot says:

          But that’s the problem; It’s NOT for young adults. It specifically states, right on the box, that it’s a product for people of 18 year of age or older. You say that you don’t think GTA should have gotten certification to be sold AS A PRODUCT THAT YOU MUST BE 18 TO BUY. I am a healthy 28 year old of sound mind, but you are stating that you don’t think I should be able to buy a product that contains a fairly tame torture scene (he got some teeth pulled, uh oh) because your kids might illegally obtain it and expose themselves to it. Personally, I think that I wouldn’t have a problem with my kids playing GTA, because I don’t believe that seeing violence contributes at all to mental instability. People throughout history have grown up witnessing public executions and duels, people dying of disease on the street, and humanity hasn’t collapsed yet.

          Where does it stop? Should movies with depictions of graphic sexual contact, rated for Adults Only (porn), no longer receive certification and stop production because your kids might see it? Well… I still wanna see it. Should cigarettes stop being made, because your kids might get some and smoke them? I still wanna smoke them.

          And here’s where it gets tricky; what about people of a different opinion than you. What about people that don’t think that any form of media should be able to depict people who DON’T worship Christ. They don’t want their kids exposed to that, so they don’t think those items should be produced, in case their kids get their hands on em.

          So here’s what we’ll do. We’ll keep making them, put a sticker right on the front of the box that says your kids aren’t old enough to buy it, we’ll even tell the cashier that he can’t sell it to anyone under 18, and if your kids really want it, you’ll have to inform yourself on the product and go buy it for them.

          • Yosharian says:

            “But that’s the problem; It’s NOT for young adults. It specifically states, right on the box, that it’s a product for people of 18 year of age or older.”

            Yet it’s just as popular among kids and young adults as it is with people who are 18+.

            “You say that you don’t think GTA should have gotten certification to be sold AS A PRODUCT THAT YOU MUST BE 18 TO BUY.”

            Yes, I think that.

            “I am a healthy 28 year old of sound mind, but you are stating that you don’t think I should be able to buy a product that contains a fairly tame torture scene (he got some teeth pulled, uh oh) because your kids might illegally obtain it and expose themselves to it.”

            Yes, I think that. And I don’t agree that the torture scenes are tame.

            “Personally, I think that I wouldn’t have a problem with my kids playing GTA, because I don’t believe that seeing violence contributes at all to mental instability.”

            I never said that seeing violence on screen was the problem.

            “People throughout history have grown up witnessing public executions and duels, people dying of disease on the street, and humanity hasn’t collapsed yet.”

            Also, note the ‘people’ and not ‘kids/young adults’.

            “Where does it stop? Should movies with depictions of graphic sexual contact, rated for Adults Only (porn), no longer receive certification and stop production because your kids might see it?”

            Slippery slope fallacy: we’re not talking about porn.

            “Well… I still wanna see it. Should cigarettes stop being made, because your kids might get some and smoke them? I still wanna smoke them.”

            Slippery slope fallacy: we’re not talking about cigarettes.

            “And here’s where it gets tricky; what about people of a different opinion than you.”

            This isn’t about individual opinion. PEGI doesn’t assign ratings based on individual opinions, they do it based on what society thinks. What would have been AO rating 50 years ago is now viewed as tame.

            “What about people that don’t think that any form of media should be able to depict people who DON’T worship Christ. They don’t want their kids exposed to that, so they don’t think those items should be produced, in case their kids get their hands on em.”

            Slippery slope fallacy: we’re not talking about religion.

            “So here’s what we’ll do. We’ll keep making them, put a sticker right on the front of the box that says your kids aren’t old enough to buy it, we’ll even tell the cashier that he can’t sell it to anyone under 18, and if your kids really want it, you’ll have to inform yourself on the product and go buy it for them.”

            Not sure what you’re trying to achieve with this statement but evidently this isn’t working, since lots of kids are playing the game.

      • Jonfon says:

        Yes. That’s what being a parent is. To define boundries and rules. You cant watch that, you’re too young. You cant eat that, dinner is on the way. You cant play that, but this is supposed to be brilliant and theres co-op so we can all play together. Parental responsibility.

        of course theyre going to try and get around it and occasionally they’ll hate you for it. That’s part of the fun.

    • Dr I am a Doctor says:

      Brutal torture is fine as long as there are no nips

  22. sapien82 says:

    This is why we have a rating system so parents can make informed choices about what games their lovely little perfect children can buy and play

    but wait , why the hell are responsible parents even buying these games for kids as they are all rated for adults
    so the shame blame game lies soley with the parents themselves and not the art direction , script writers of the games industry

    Furthermore children/ teenagers are always going to rebel against their parents thats what they do ! its part of growing up , parents cannot protect their little prodigies from the world at large so they will be affected by one thing if not the other!

    If you dont want your kids playing these games, then dont buy them , dont let them play round at their friends houses if their parents are less likely to care about what their kid plays

    take yer political correctness and ram it right up yer collective “think about the children” parents arses!

    • Ich Will says:

      “dont let them play round at their friends houses ”

      This statement positively demonstrates that you have no idea just how difficult it is – Unless you make your child a social pariah, and I argue that most children will outsmart their parents in a heartbeat anyway, you will be letting them play at other peoples houses. Those other parents will lie to you about what their child does. Those other parents have not set up the controls properly. Those other parents have no idea that their son uses the xbox or computer. They will get defensive if you ask them not to let your son do something at their house, take it as a criticism of their parenting skills and throw their toys out of the pram more often than not. Hell, one set of parents of my sons friends were shocked when I pointed out that the phone their son had been using for the last year could access the internet.

      I agree that the problem is not the games or the content within, but you can’t just point to the parents and blame them.

  23. DeathRow says:

    I thought there was some kind of news for the GTAV Pc version. I am sadded. I now hate the picture of the baby.

  24. ludicrous_pedagogy says:

    Although I absolutely agree with everything John said, I’m not surprised by the fear and confusion among parents. I work in a boys secondary school and saw the excitement leading up to the GTA 5 launch. It was like a ‘special day’ at school, all the boys talking about it. There was something similar (but not so pronounced) for the BF4 and COD:Ghost launch weeks. Interestingly, no-one noticed the Batman game launch – something that I think should be playable and enjoyable by boys that age.
    Time and again, I come back to the same question: Where are the ‘good’ games for the 11-15 year olds? Why are all the Batman Akham games rated 16+? Why is a Pirate Fantasy Game with a premise that could sit aside a ‘Time Raiders’ teen fiction novel, so grossly violent enough to be rated 18? Why are Historical Strategy games like all the Total Wars post-Medieval 2 rated 16+? Or LOTR War in the North? I spend a lot of time looking for 12+ games, and its so inconsistent – Mass Effect (Xbox 360), Medal of Honor Allied Assault (PC) are some of the interesting entries!
    Many of these boys are embedded within their own ‘gaming culture’ and want to be part of these ‘cultural events’ as they see them – and it seems very cruel to say no (which is why so many parents ‘give in’ to pester power) to developing their interests.
    Sadly, I feel like I’ve resigned to at least try and teach them how to ‘read’ these games. On ‘GTA Day’ as I called it, I made it my mission to make sure every boy knew that the game was Scottish (rather than American) and that it was something called ‘Satire’. Hopefully some of it got through, but in time I’m hoping to run some presentations for parents at next years autumn deluge of AAA ‘Adult’ games.
    Because John’s right, they should be playing Lego/Scibblenauts (and some do!) but I think they should also be allowed to access some content that is a bit more serious in tone, at least as serious at a graphic novel (like Batman) or some teen fantasy fiction.

    • The Random One says:

      I hope your students understood GTAV was satire. Rockstar surely didn’t.

      • ludicrous_pedagogy says:

        Touché! To be honest I hadn’t played the new one until recently, and it does seem to take itself a little too seriously at times. But just saying it could be interpreted as Scotland taking the mick out of US culture I believe can have a consciousness raising effect. If the kids are gonna play it anyway, we should at least talk to them about it intelligently; What is it trying to say/do and is it successful? What makes it different to other games? Why is it rated the age it is? The worst thing I think we can do it just completely disengage – which I think is too often is how the educational establishment reacts.

  25. derbefrier says:

    I played Mortal Kombat on sega genisis when I was a kid and now I can’t walk into a building without harpooning someone in the chest yelling “GET OVER HERE!”. If only I had nintendos edited version I wouldn’t have to live like this.

  26. The Random One says:

    To be honest, if I was a parent I’d be afraid my babies would play GTAV as well. While John is right that articles like that pretend regulatory bodies don’t exist, the truth is that games like GTAV are completely ubiquitous for gamers of all ages. Even if you don’t buy it they are almost certain to play it at a friend’s house.

  27. somnolentsurfer says:

    They’ve put an update on the post saying they’ve had ‘feedback from people suggesting that children under the age of the certificate do not play these types of games.’ Which is obviously exactly the point John was making, and not wilfully misrepresenting anything at all.

  28. Monkeh says:

    “As I rather rudely replied to the press release, have they similarly surveyed about which cars they don’t want their children to drive this Christmas? Which alcoholic beverages they least want to find in their child’s stocking? Why is what adult entertainment they don’t want their children to have even a question being asked? This could be a constructive conversation. Why can’t this be a survey of the games parents most hope their children receive this Christmas? With an audience of parents, it would seem far more sensible and productive for the question to have been reversed, to ask whether they would prefer their son or daughter receive Scribblenauts or Lego Marvel this Christmas. The results would then prove useful, a helpful buyer’s guide for their users, and help point parents away from the grown up games in favour of the appropriate products.”

    This paragraph is so true and was the first thing I thought when I started reading this article. As usual, it’s easier to blame ‘society’ (or things within society, like games) than to just be a proper parent.

    • mukuste says:

      Note that the author of that article isn’t a parent.

      • SominiTheCommenter says:

        R-R-R-RAMPAGE!
        mukuste Wins! (the argument)
        FATALITY!

        • mukuste says:

          Not sure if you’re being sarcastic or what your point is or what argument you thought I was making. I do want to say that a lot of the posts here boil down to “just be a proper parent”, which is all well and good but comes across as a bit hypocritical when most people saying that have no idea how fucking hard parenting is and how much stuff you have to worry about.

          • mukuste says:

            And, why I posted that, people find it easy to accuse parents for their “bad parenting’, while the author of that article in fact is not a parent, and the responses in the comment section of that site by real parents were actually really reasonable.

  29. BLACKOUT-MK2 says:

    I don’t have a kid but if I were asked to do this survey I’d say a board game for fear of them choking on the pieces, see how they like that. Anyway, I’d doubt that any parents will be getting these games for their kids. Father Christmas will be the one taking care of that, right parents?

  30. Sigh says:

    With all due respect, when can we get back to great PC games coverage and games journals of the sort that Quinns and Adam Smith used to write? God I miss the days of the Solium Infernum, EUIII, and Mount & Blade write-ups.

    I am greatly enjoying the “Games of Christmas” feature as always (my blog highlight of the year), so Happy Holidays!

  31. AdamDenton says:

    And so continues the media fear-mongering sensationalism, perpetuated and sustained by playing on a generation’s ignorance and naïveté of a still newly emerging medium.

    The real question is: if a paradigm shift is required in the public perception of games – just what will it take to cause this? As much as I would like to believe it could happen as the result of a singular, focused initiative, as with most things – the most likely catalyst will be time.

  32. Psymon says:

    “What game would you least like your child to get for Christmas”
    Did the people they survey fucking believe in Santa?!
    How the fuck exactly are these children going to get any from that fine selection of games for Christmas?

    Let’s pretend for a moment these children have a ‘fun’ uncle who buys the game for said child.
    What now? “Oh I don’t want to upset my child by taking their present away. I’ll just let them commit mass virtual murder then cry about it to local media”.

    How there isn’t a parent licence, I don’t fucking know.

  33. Thurgret says:

    Perhaps they need a listing of games suitable for their kids? I mean, the age ratings alone don’t seem to quite cut it, and, besides, your five year old may not quite grasp Cities in Motion 2 even if it’s open to all ages (splendid game, incidentally). Presumably there is a dearth of such lists out there? I haven’t actually gone looking. If I were John, I might compile a list of games that he would let his kid play, or solicit advice from the readers here, then send that along to people concerned about the effect of games, as a suggestion of potentially more suitable alternatives to Call of Killzone: Zombie Dudebro 2 – The Car Thief.

    • Ich Will says:

      The problem is that every child is very different. A list would be worthless for nearly every parent because it wouldn’t take their child into account. The only way is for a parent to make a judgement call for their child based on the parents unique knowledge for their child.

      We do then get the situation where one 13 year old is fine with GTA 5 whereas another is not. And this may be seen as unfair to the child who is not allowed to play the game, especially if we perceive the child’s parents to be acting out of hysteria than knowledge and fact.

      But the point is, the child will not be held back by not being allowed to play the game, they will not suffer for it (no matter how much they believe that they will). The parent is the only person qualified to make that judgement and no-one in the world has the right, currently based on our knowledge of the subject i.e. none has the right to tell that parent they are wrong. Outside of the remit of social services, a parents parenting is beyond criticism for the simple reason that you do not know their child as well as they do.

      So you may proclaim to the world that you played GTA1 when you were 10 and that you are not a mass murderer and your child at age 13 plays GTA V and is perfectly well adjusted. That’s lovely but then to try to apply that to another child is intellectually bankrupt if that child’s parents contradict you. Every child develops differently and you really can’t get a fixed development until the age of 21ish.

      All we can really do is the very best for our own children, respect the wishes of other parents and not pay any attention to the chattering masses trying to tell you to bring your children up differently.

      • Thurgret says:

        Oh, I can appreciate that kids are different, absolutely. I’m not a parent myself, but I’m concerned that non-gamer parents whose kids want games may not be in a position to judge for themselves just what is suitable and what isn’t. Mass media, advertising and hysteria don’t particularly help. I’m thinking television adverts for Call of Duty with a bunch of teenagers ‘being’ soldiers, and the typical stuff that goes up about consoles, too. That’s how gaming in general is being presented to the average non-gamer – at least, it seems so, and I may be mistaken.

        There are many franchises which I don’t like. Usually, I find them tasteless or excessively violent. There is, coincidentally, quite a substantial overlap between franchises I don’t like and franchises which people engage in scaremongering about. I just wonder if they are given the impression that those franchises are all there is to gaming, I guess.

        Ugh. Having trouble expressing my point coherently here. Sorry! Hopefully it makes some sense.

  34. Megakoresh says:

    “As I rather rudely replied to the press release, have they similarly surveyed about which cars they don’t want their children to drive this Christmas? Which alcoholic beverages they least want to find in their child’s stocking? Why is what adult entertainment they don’t want their children to have even a question being asked?”

    Because “video games are bad”-implying headlines get them attention. That or their own parents have apparently failed miserably.

  35. Bull0 says:

    Just organise the games shops/digital store fronts the same way they do video shops. You don’t find the thomas the tank engine DVDs next to the torture porn, so why are all the games just lumped together? Why not have a section of kids’ games and properly delineate that from the rest? That’ll do more to make joe public fucking get it than some little age rating symbols they won’t look at. Why didn’t Dr. Byron come up with that?

    • Nicodemus Rexx says:

      A lot of the game stores I’ve been to here in the South East US tend to be pretty small. This may not be the rule, but it is my experience. I also worked in one for a while so I can attest that it could be hard enough to find the space just to allocate games we had in stock by platform and keep the system intuitive and browsable, much less then divide it by “New” and “Used;” even MORE less to then subcategorize.

      Now, don’t take this as a defense of the current system, because it’s not, and you do make a good point. It’s just that DVDS all fall under the heading of “DVD” so then you can concentrate on subdividing by content more easily. (Okay, fine. Plus Blu-Ray. That’s two.) But in gaming the vendors often insist that their brand of product be clearly seperate from all the other brands in the store to avoid confusion.

      So not only do you have to divide up the store by “New” and “used,” you must also divide it up by XBOX 360, XBOX ONE, PS3, PS4, PS VITA, WIIU, 3DS, coming attractions, accessories of all shapes and sizes, and still leave a tiny corner to hide the PC hard copies in to make sure no one will try to buy them.

      In a word: It sucks. And it only sucked the more when any of the vendors or corporate would demand we ALSO find a way to showcase “Hot TItles” within the rickity system we already had in place.

      That said, I’m sure there’s a solution that would make it easier, but the way marketing this stuff is currently thought of, of it’s probably not going to get any easier any time soon. :/

  36. Frank says:

    Yeah, I’d be much more interested in the games they *do* want to buy. Said site has really fallen down on the job.

    Also, I’m a “gamer” and I know nothing of the particulars of the sequels on that list. I’m sure actual parents know even less.

  37. Carra says:

    18+ games. It would be like asking if they want to give their kids Black on White or Bang my Gate 2.

  38. undr337 says:

    John`s blurb is cool, I just bought a gorgeous Subaru Impreza from earning $5396 thiss month and would you believe, $10k this past munth. this is certainly the best work I have ever had. I started this four months/ago and pretty much straight away made myself at least $79, per-hour. more information http://ho.io/Freelance

  39. Kubrick Stare Nun says:

    The problem is that ‘concerned parents’ need a new bogeyman so they will leave video games alone. I vote for smartphones and social networks.

  40. DestroyYourEgo says:

    Meh- GTA V sucks, anyways. It’s not what it used to be. And changing characters on the fly is NOT a ground-breaking mechanic.

  41. Universal Quitter says:

    “Why is what adult entertainment they don’t want their children to have even a question being asked?”

    I’ve often said that poll questions don’t cover as many potential viewpoints as they should.

    “Do you really know what you’re talking about?” “Do you even care about this subject, or are you just forming an opinion solely for the purpose of avoiding discomfort?” “Name five gaming genres.” “Are you a robot?”

    I really think its a problem of phrasing. Most folks really aren’t insane when you sit down and talk to them, and if more people would take a minute to set a person straight, instead of freaking out at them for being wrong about something, there’d be less room in society for this kind of newsmaking.

  42. Stompopolos says:

    I think the reason why games ratings tend to get ignored is that in a lot of cases, they should be. An R18 game likely won’t be as gory as a film with the same rating or have nudity. GTA V does, so then it becomes the parent’s responsibility to research the game and decide if it’s ok for their child.

  43. Tiberius says:

    I’m actually a little sad that there was in fact no mention of eating babies.

    We’ve been lied to! FOR SHAME.

  44. Richard Burton says:

    Is it just me, but do you too, wish to punch the baby in the picture? I’m thinking that this child might grow up to be that certain person, you know that has a face that you want to “naturally punch”. Or am I wrong on this?

  45. Romeric says:

    Signed up to comment on this. Really good article. I’d lay down my opinion but its so perfectly summed up above that I don’t need to. Cheers.

  46. YohnTheViking says:

    An article in a Norwegian magazine, connected to one of Norway’s largest newspapers, with the same demographic as the site in the article, actually did do what was asked for.

    In a recent piece, linked to the newspaper website, they actually did ask the games reviewer of the newspaper to make suggestions for which games would be great for their kids as christmas gifts. The more I hear and see while living in the UK, the more I understand how accepted games as a hobby has become in Norway.

  47. ChrisMidget says:

    As I am a still a teenager I feel inclined to comment on parenting. My parents have finally agreed to let me get some 18 rated games, like I have been allowed to see a couple of 18 rated movies but they most certainly would not let me get GTA V, I personally wouldn’t want to get the game anyway as a matter of taste but that is aside the point, and I think we are at the point where parents feel pushed into buying some games like GTA by their children. This is partly because some games in the 18 category aren’t that bad, the but because it is in the same category it makes GTA seem not as bad. Also as some other users have said is that parents see video games as just another toy, which is irresponsible as video games can be as violent as movies at one end of the spectrum but at the other end they can be targeted at young children. The final problem is that some parents let the child to get 18 rated games at a young age so other children would use the “All my friends have it” argument.