Glitchspace Looks Way Smarter Than Me

By John Walker on February 20th, 2014 at 4:00 pm.

First-person puzzling is a genre there can never be enough of, and Space Budgie’s Glitchspace is adding itself to the gang. Immediately visually reminiscent of InMomentum, this isn’t so much about speed, but more – well – reprogramming the platforms to allow you to achieve your goals. It’s best that you watch the video.

Having had a play of it, it really is as involved as it looks. Right clicking on any glitching red object gives you access to the object’s programming, and allows you to amend various aspects. As someone with the programming knowledge of a log this is immediately challenging stuff, even if at first you can only make very minor changes. But then, it’s all the more satisfying to make a platform bouncy when it wasn’t before. The issue with the game right now, in an alpha 1.1 stage, is that it’s not trying to teach me why what I changed made that difference. But then, this is very early stuff, and it’s fantastically solid already.

The game is currently available in alpha from IndieGameStand, itch.io, and Gumroad, for $4.99/£2.99, and on Greenlight for what I would assume is a fairly guaranteed spot on Steam.

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7 Comments »

  1. bear912 says:

    Interesting. I can’t say I quite fully understand how the system works from the trailer, but I like programming (and node-based interfaces), so this is appealing.

  2. Morcane says:

    Looking at the trailer I’m already sold. It probably helps I fix glitches (aka code) for a living though.

  3. MrUnimport says:

    As cool as programming puzzlers are, the level design here seems drearily abstract. I’m pretty sure being trapped in an arbitrary abstract geometric landscape where I must puzzle to progress ranks highly on my list of nightmare scenarios.

  4. alfie275 says:

    The programming reminds me a lot of the Wiremod addon for GMod.

  5. Cowey says:

    It looks a bit of a shame that the reprogramming is limited to only a few platforms; it seems like it might be much more fun to mess around with the entire levels, but the game still look quite exciting.

    Although I’m not sure it looks “way smarter than me am”

  6. Scurra says:

    Hmmm. I guess that Code Hero spent a bit too long in the outer darkness such that it’s basic premise has had time to be assimilated and improved upon by others. It’s going to look badly outdated when it finally does emerge I fear when things like this are around.

    • Nixitur says:

      So far, it seems like you have a few constants and functions that you can connect to each other, but that’s it. It doesn’t really seem to have much to do with programming and more with combinatorial circuits.
      Which is fine, I guess, but it’s really very different from Code Hero, the goal of which is to teach actual coding.