Megaspace: 1 Hour Of AI War Follow-Up The Last Federation

By Alec Meer on March 19th, 2014 at 4:00 pm.

Older readers may recall that in February we took a peek at The Last Federation, the new space strategy game from Arcen Games. Even older readers may recall that Arcen first came to our attention for AI War – and lo, many a joke about Quintin and iron was spawned. After confusing everyone with A Valley Without Wind, and some appealing experiments in between, they’ve now returned to the genre which made them.

But what manner of beast is The Last Federation exactly? AI War too, or something very different? That’s the kind of question which can only be answered by watching an hour long (and change) alpha video. And also by saying that’s a hybrid of intergalactic simulation, grand strategy and RTS.

Even if you can’t make it through a full 67 minutes of someone else playing spaceships, enough other people did to send a host of apparently useful feedback Arcen’s way, particularly in relation to the combat system, which two days later resulted in another, 16 minute video demonstrating brand new changes:

Ooh, it does look impressively big, doesn’t it? Tons to do, and the promise that each campaign will constitute a unique story due to the game essentially simulating various space-governments co-operating, squabbling and fighting with each other. This is the overarching promise of The Last Federation, in fact – it’s “a strategy/tactics game set inside a simulation game.” I love the ambition, and I really hope it works.

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10 Comments »

  1. luukdeman111 says:

    God, do I love Arcen. You could say their games are hit and miss but when they hit they hit big. And even the games that are considered to be their misses are still, at least, somewhat interesting.

    Since AI War is one of my favorite games of all time this kinda gets me excited eventhough I’m not really sold on the video’s yet… But hey, Arcen’s games pretty much always look like crap…

  2. The Army of None says:

    I had some amazingly good times with AI War with friends. Long, massive campaigns against the AI with lots of planning and deliberating. Will pick up this on release for sure!

  3. Premium User Badge

    RedViv says:

    It’s pretty much where I expected it to fall between Drox and Captains Under Necromantic Threat. Good. Good.

    Arcen: Specific games, for specific people. When they hit, they HIT.

  4. DatonKallandor says:

    Small scale really isn’t Arcen strenght. The closer they pull in the scale, the more their bad art and janky animation hurt them. This looks like another Valley Without Wind, only in a setting I might be more forgiving towards.

  5. stblr says:

    The simulation part is massively appealing, but I’m worried that the combat aspect will be to the detriment of the overall product. Personally I’d rather tool around in a massive galactic machine than be forced to play ARPG segments. And I’m sure there are people who’d prefer the combat to the simulation. Splitting the experience so sharply between two very disparate modes of play is risky at best.

    • Professor Paul1290 says:

      It only gets a passing mention in the video, but the game will also get an “auto-resolve” mode.

  6. knowitall011 says:

    so ai wars with a randomized campaign? + some rpg elements? I am down with that!

  7. wodin says:

    Would be much better if you could set SOP’s for each ship which would cut out lots of micromanagement. For instance one SOP could be “Use anti shield weapons against shielded ship then anti armour once shield destroyed” or “When ships shield at 10& retreat from battle until restored” or “If armour down to 50% retreat from battle” etc etc. The more SOP’s the more detailed instructions you can give each of your ships.

    • huw says:

      Post that on their forum; I can pretty much guarantee they’ll give it serious consideration.

    • Premium User Badge

      Gap Gen says:

      Ideally you could hire fleet commanders with better grasp of their ships’ abilities and basic tactics, and then let the AI commanders do most of the work while you concentrate on strategy and key engagements.