Oooh! Twitchy Spinny Dodge ‘Em Up oO

By Alice O'Connor on August 28th, 2014 at 6:00 pm.

Everything is going FINE.

As much as I’d like to spin around inside a washing machine, I know how that ends. But lovely, lovely video games can let us do impossible things, and games like Super Hexagon offer that dream of spinning around inside a round thing filled with jagged edges and crushing surfaces. oO has been out for a while but only twirled before my eyes today. It’s a one-button dodge ‘em up about spinning around and jumping between conjoined circles filled increasingly with death.

It’s free and it’s fun and it’s difficult and it’s late in the day so let’s all lark about a bit playing it.

oO gives you control of a little dot following the circumference of a circle. Clicking or pressing space switches you from the inside edge to the outside, and vice versa. If you’re at an intersection with another circle, this’ll transfer you over (or crush you if you mis-time it). So you flip from circle to circle, checkpoint to checkpoint, progressing through levels. Then you discover the spikes that line some circles. And the moving spikes which appear and disappear on others. And spikes which flip from in to out. And the levels with a distorted view. And…

You start off all twitchy, watching and reacting, but need to slip into rhythm, feeling timings and flowing by instinct. By the time I nailed some of the trickier bits, I could’ve done them blindfolded.

Good stuff. You can play for free on Kongregate. You can buy it on pocket telephones for cash money too, if you’d like to play e.g. in a bed or on a rollercoaster.

Ta to Ste Curran for cooing about this on Twitter.

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3 Comments »

  1. Ross Angus says:

    Alas, my poor aching reaction times went into spasm at that video. Go, young ones. Have your merriment. Tell me when the turn-based version comes out.

  2. LTK says:

    I echo the above, I actually played the green levels before watching the video but the red levels became more demanding than I was willing to bear.

    To anyone who is still able to derive enjoyment out of powering through challenging, fast-paced reaction time gauntlets, I applaud you and wish you good luck.

    (Okay the red levels actually weren’t so difficult but I’m throwing in the towel after those, really.)

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