Lamp And Vamp Is The Best Free Game

By Adam Smith on March 27th, 2014.

It’s a bold claim, I know, particularly when the opposition on the ‘Best Free Game’ field includes the likes of Planetside 2, Dwarf Fortress and Dungeon Keeper. Nevertheless, Lamp And Vamp is the best free game that I’ve played today and the best new free game that I’ve played since Tuesday. Created as part of the Procedural Death Jam, and taking first place, it’s a puzzle game in which you play a vampire who is trying to return to his coffin. Pesky townspeople and priests block the way but using your powers (BAT-FORM, MIST-FORM, BLOODSUCKING), you can navigate the streets and find your way home. It’s absolutely splendid.

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A Taste Of Wang: Shadow Warrior Demo

By Adam Smith on March 26th, 2014.

I liked everything about the Shadow Warrior reboot, except for the wang jokes. But to prove that there are no hard feelings, I’ve slipped a wang in right there at the top of the post. The reason we are returning to Shadow Warrior, as the headline makes clear, is to herald the unexpected (though far from premature) discharge of a demo. This coincides with a 75% discount so you can take a test ride and then settle on the full package for £7.49. That massive discount won’t last for very long – you know how it is – and the deal ends on March 28th. Important details below.

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Your Whole Keyboard Controls One Sad Spider In Spidren

By Nathan Grayson on March 26th, 2014.

Parenting!

Spidren is the spindly, web-spinning Train Jam spawn of Octodad programmer Devon Scott-Tunkin, and that kinda makes perfect sense when you think about it. It’s about an oft-misunderstood owner of too many legs and one lonely heart just trying to scrape by as its brood of children wreak havoc on its life. Difference is, while Octodad plucked out a gentle, family-friendly melody on heartstrings, Spidren does anything but. If you fail to protect your multi-segmented legs by flailing about using almost your entire keyboard, your bizarrely adorable younglings will STAB YOU TO DEATH WITH YOUR OWN FEET. Let this serve as a lesson, folks: it’s not easy being a spider, and it’s even harder when you’re a single spider mother whose children are unrepentant murderers.

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Live Free Play Hard: Buried Alive And Loving It

By Porpentine on March 24th, 2014.

Therapeutic living burial. Adorable cat simulator. The ancient sport of gun-hopping.

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Art Failure: Action Painting Pro

By Adam Smith on March 21st, 2014.

Action Painting Pro is a platform game in which the screen becomes a colourful mess as each playthrough works toward its conclusion. Different types of brush can be collected and paint spews from the player in an appropriate pattern, the colour changing as objects are collected. To survive and continue with your masterpiece, you’ll have to manage three resources by springing around the screen across the scaffolding that shifts position after every pick up. The resources are hearts (health), dollar signs (money) and artistic abillity (blue diamonds?). All three are effectively time limits that must be regularly topped up, which creates a nerve-jangling pressure that is only heightened by the nightmarish soundtrack.

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To The BetaMobile: Infinite Crisis Open Beta

By Adam Smith on March 17th, 2014.


Last night, for the second time in my life, I tried to play a MOBA. Infinite Crisis may not be the best choice but I figured the people playing might have spent slightly less time pounding the lanes than the veteran e-thletes of LOL and DOTA 2. Not so. The open beta began this weekend but almost every player seems to be visiting from elsewhere within the genre. There is a tutorial mode of sorts, in which a team of humans fight against bots. If a MOBA were a pair of trousers, I think I’m now at the point where I’d struggle to put them on but I’d be able to explain where the legs are supposed to go. I’d almost certainly fail to zip up the flies though and would inexplicably fill the pockets with termites or blancmange. Launch trailer below.

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Live Free Play Hard: I’m Not A Rapture

By Porpentine on March 16th, 2014.

Eating language. My alchemical romance. The end of the world has a choppy frame rate.

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Brand New Game From Japan: Shikihime Garden

By Adam Smith on March 15th, 2014.

badger, apparently

The headline is a quote from the trailer for the recently translated Shikihime Garden, which isn’t a brand new game at all. However, since the English language version has just gone live, this is good a time to talk about it as any. It’s a free-to-play browser-based (or Book of Faces) game, which may well avoid certain free-to-play sins thanks to the absence of paid-for boosters. You can’t pay your way to the top and the game instead rewards skill and ‘patience’. The cynic in me is barking about the similarities between the patient man and a grindstone. As for the activities involved, they range from deck building and turn-based combat to gardening.

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Dynetzzle: Terrible Name, Interesting Game

By John Walker on March 13th, 2014.

Here’s a novel puzzle game, with a deeply peculiar name. Dynetzzle – seemingly crafted in a special laboratory to be the most forgettable, irrelevant, and impossible to remember how to spell game name of all time – is based around unfolded dice. Nets of cubes, combined with the magical fact that all opposite sides of a dice add up to 7. Combine those two elements, and you get a rather nice idea for a little puzzle game. One that is, apparently, soon to become a bigger puzzle game. But you can play the 10-level version for free, right now.

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Just In Time – Dead Synchronicity: Tomorrow Comes Today

By John Walker on March 13th, 2014.

There are times when I wonder if I’ve had enough of point and click adventure games. They were the most important games of my youth, and represent many spots in my top ten, but perhaps I’m after something new these days? Except, then I play a good one and I realise it’s just because there’s so much dross. From a place of no expectations at all, I found that “Oh yeah,” reaction being elicited by the (horribly named) Dead Synchronicity: Tomorrow Comes Today – it’s a properly interesting, traditional point-n-click, and that the advanced build I played is only the first half hour has made me really rather disposed to want to carry on. Which means I should probably contribute to the just-launched Kickstarter.

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Smart Moves: Galactic Command Echo Squad SE

By Adam Smith on March 13th, 2014.

The last mention of Galactic Command on RPS was so long ago that I thought the special edition that appeared on Steam at the beginning of the week was a new game with a cumbersome name. Not so. It is, in fact, a remastered release of 3000AD’s 2009 space combat sim and a demo is available for those seeking an alternative to Elite. Any mention of 3000AD president and lead developer Derek Smart risks diverting attention away from the company’s games – he is to the online spat what Molyneux is to the overblown promise – but the re-emergence of Galactic Command is timely and makes Kieron’s 2009 interview with Smart a fascinating piece to revisit. Details on the game and interview follow.

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