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Ian
03-06-2011, 10:10 AM
THE FORUM NEEDS BOOKS.

As with my last post in the thread on ye-olde-o-forum, I am reading Soul Music by Terry Pratchett.

Spectre-7
03-06-2011, 10:16 AM
Just read The Psychopath Test by Jon Ronson last week. Not sure what to read next.

Ezhar
03-06-2011, 10:25 AM
The Greg Mandel trilogy by Peter F. Hamilton (currently on book 2/3). On account of having read everything else of his.

Also the free sample of the Witcher book (english translation) wasn't half bad, so I'm considering that for afterwards.

Spacewalk
03-06-2011, 10:26 AM
Close to finishing The Broken Sword and have been really enjoying it.

Mana_Garmr
03-06-2011, 10:37 AM
Just finished re-reading the A Song of Ice and Fire books. Need to find something else to read later.

Kelron
03-06-2011, 10:47 AM
Dune Messiah.

Just finished Don Quixote which was an interesting read, took me a long time to get through it. It made me wish I was fluent enough to read it in Spanish, the translation was good but a lot of the wordplay simply doesn't work in English.

moth bones
03-06-2011, 10:50 AM
'Twirlymen' by Amol Rajan, an account of the history of spin bowling. Quite absorbing.

Also, Roger Zelazny's 'Chronicles Of Amber', a supposed fantasy classic I've never got round to trying. So far it veers between inspired and somewhat leaden, but there's more than enough to keep me reading.

Ace Jon
03-06-2011, 11:00 AM
Last thing I read was I Shall Wear Midnight by Terry Pratchett. That man can't write fast enough. Does anyone have any suggestions for a Pratchett-lover that's read all the Pratchett books? I need to broaden my horizons methinks.

Theoban
03-06-2011, 11:00 AM
I'm on the Xeelee Sequence omnibus by Stephen Baxter, just started the last one in the omnibus, Ring. Excellent read so far, even though the first book in this set, Raft, starts off as one of those tiresome 'adventure tourism' books but does improve dramatically after.

Also just got the third Achewood collection. I love Achewood.

Ian
03-06-2011, 11:08 AM
@ Ace Jon: Are the Tiffany Aching ones good for all ages, then? I've not got to them in the order of Discworld books anyway but I was a bit unsure because of them being branded as targeted at "Young Adult".

Athena
03-06-2011, 11:18 AM
Nice to see other book lovers! I'm a big fan of fantasy, sci-fi, novels, and more.

@ Ian
I think they are fine, perhaps not as complicated as the normal Discworld novel. Discworld is one of my favourite fantasy series, good to see other fans here.

@ Ezhar
Are they any good so far? I've read the Night's Dawn trilogy but not the Greg Mandel one yet. Loved the Night's Dawn Trilogy though.

I'm currently (re)reading 'Mountain of Black Glass' part three of the 'Otherland' series by Tad Wiliams. It's pretty good.

G915
03-06-2011, 11:19 AM
Patriot Games by Tom Clancy. I've played so many of Tom Clancy games and I realized that I've never read a single Tom Clancy book.. So I started reading the entire Jack Ryan series.

amishmonster
03-06-2011, 11:37 AM
I'm in the middle of Cursor's Fury by Jim Butcher. Book three of the excellent Codex Alera series.

@Theoban, I've been pondering Baxter for a while now after mostly enjoying Moonseed. I also have Vacuum Diagrams, is that an ok place to start with him?

Theoban
03-06-2011, 11:40 AM
@amishmonster - unsure to be honest, I've only read these four books in the omnibus, but looking at what people are saying, Vacuum Diagrams seems a good place to step into his Xeelee Sequence of books

Ging
03-06-2011, 11:48 AM
I finished up <i>The Quantum Thief</i> by Hannu Rajaniemi last night and started <i>Traitor</i> by Duncan Falconer - it's a McNab-esque action jobby, but with the SBS rather than the SAS. It'll probably be done by the end of the weekend at which point I'll either go back to hard sci fi with <i>Leviathan Wakes</i> by James Corey, go down the fantasy route with Sanderson's <i>The Way of Kings</i> or go for something else entirely.

westyfield
03-06-2011, 11:50 AM
I'm currently reading <I>No Country for Old Men</I> by Cormac McCarthy. After that I'm going to read <i>Mass Effect: Retribution</i> by Drew Karpyshyn.

Ashkin
03-06-2011, 11:52 AM
I have been reading the Hunger Games trilogy recently, but right now I'm flipping through 250 Indie Games You Must Play. I've also got Machine of Death lined up for reading later.

venn177
03-06-2011, 12:02 PM
Started up Relentless by Dean Koontz last week.

soupeh
03-06-2011, 12:04 PM
Currently reading Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card. Author is a ballbag, but the book is amazing.

Imminence
03-06-2011, 12:21 PM
Patriot Games is the best in the series. And the first chapter is the best first chapter I have read in terms of gripping you and forcing you to read the rest of the book.

Rii
03-06-2011, 12:24 PM
In addition to 'Anarchism and Other Essays' by Emma Goldman and 'The Concorde Story' (7th ed.) by Christopher Orlebar, I'm still working my through the tales of Edgar Allen Poe. Of his stories I've read thus far my favourites are:

'The Unparalleled Adventure of One Hans Pfaall' (to the moon in a hot air balloon!)

'The Thousand-and-Second Tale of Scheherazade' (by which I was necessarily also introduced to the delightful framing tale of 'Arabian Nights')

'The Murders in the Rue Morgue' (the absurd explanation for the crime presented in this, the 'birth of the detective genre', caught me quite by surprise and renders the tale forever memorable)

'The Purloined Letter'

'The Fall of the House of Usher'

'The Black Cat'

'The Island of the Fay' (a rare and beautiful written expression of an apparent - but only, of course, apparent - stream of whimsical consciousness)

'The System of Doctor Tarr and Professor Fether' (is this the origin of the phrase 'the lunatics are running the asylum'?)

'How to Write a Blackwood Article' and 'A Predicament' (ah, humour, something I'd not expected from Poe. I'm not sure I'll ever forget the name, manner or fate of one Miss Psyche Zenobia.)

'The Business Man' (I like to think of this as a wry commentary on American values)

'Mellonta Tauta' (one-thousand years into the future and still we use hot-air balloons! Also I am indebted to Mr. Poe for his delightful characterisation herein of induction and deduction as respectively the methods of the Hog and the Ram)

Dubbill
03-06-2011, 12:26 PM
I'm reading Flat Earth News by Nick Davies, a horrifying look at the sordid state of journalism. Next up is Treasure Islands: Tax Havens and the Men who Stole the World by Nicholas Shaxson, a horrifying look at the how the money-men are fucking the world. After that I may have to read some books for children in order to lighten my mood.

Plankton
03-06-2011, 12:26 PM
Right now im reading The Godfather and Catch22. The first Witcher novel should arrive soon. :)

Serenegoose
03-06-2011, 12:26 PM
Currently reading Black Man by Richard Morgan, then I'll be getting through the Ambassador's Mission and The Rogue by Trudi Canavan which should tide me until Rule 34 by Charles Stross comes out - then I'm just figuring out what to do with my reading time til November and The Alloy of Law by Brandon Sanderson comes out.

Me, an SF&F geek? Never!

raptormesh
03-06-2011, 12:27 PM
Currently rereading the Foundation series. Good fun!

DainIronfoot
03-06-2011, 12:41 PM
I just finished surface detail! That was highly enjoyable. Not sure what to read next. I have a bunch of books on my kindle I need to get through, I was getting through last of the mohicans before I finally got my paws on surface detail.

Ace Jon
03-06-2011, 01:12 PM
@ Ace Jon: Are the Tiffany Aching ones good for all ages, then? I've not got to them in the order of Discworld books anyway but I was a bit unsure because of them being branded as targeted at "Young Adult".Yeah, they're great. The language is obviously somewhat simplified and they're not as long or complex as some of his stories, but it's still Pratchett. Mmmm Pratchett.

ichbinspikeface
03-06-2011, 01:13 PM
i'm also going through the 'song of fire and ice' series by george r.r. martin, and finding it hard to enjoy other fantasy books as much after reading them... enjoying the series on ye olde box as well...

and the god delusion by richard dawkins is always on standby...

Berlin
03-06-2011, 01:26 PM
Yeah, they're great. The language is obviously somewhat simplified and they're not as long or complex as some of his stories, but it's still Pratchett. Mmmm Pratchett.

Yeah, Tiffany's great, especially since he dumped the Witches' series and Tiffany's just the same but from a different angle. Still, Weatherwax is present so these books cannot be bad.

Now I'm tryin' to get my hands on I Shall Wear Midnight but it's damn impossible in my country to buy this one and I don't want to pay millions for shipping while buying just one book.

EndelNurk
03-06-2011, 01:34 PM
I'm reading The Player of Games by Iain M. Banks for the second time. The first time was on the recommendation of Mr Gillen of this parish. I also have various other bits and pieces that I haven't paid much attention to recently unfortunately. The new Oliver Sacks book is one of them.

Dao Jones
03-06-2011, 03:09 PM
Oh no, I had the old thread bookmarked for some future reading! Guess I will have to go there and scavenge with the quickness! Currently, I am reading (plug!) "This Gaming Life" by some Jim Rosiecheeks fella. Friend from the GOG forums gifted to me in trade for Frozen Synapse and so far I am loving it! The book, that is. Game is pretty amazing too but that's neither here or there. The first part of the book is really getting to me. <3 Jim.

Krans
03-06-2011, 03:22 PM
In the Oxfam bookshop this morning I bought a copy of a Baen novel by John Dalmas entitled "The White Regiment". I do not yet have any idea whether it's any good, or indeed what it's about. I will report back soon!

Selesnya
03-06-2011, 04:10 PM
The Third Reich: A New History by Richard Burleigh.

imirk
03-06-2011, 04:14 PM
Shadowline by Glen Cook

So far it is pretty good, then again I haven't read anything that wasn't enjoyable by Cook, well except interviews :P. Standouts are Tower of Fear, The Black Company, The Dragon Never Sleeps, and Passage at Arms

Jams O'Donnell
03-06-2011, 04:19 PM
I have not read a book for so long it is criminal. I mostly read in bed, and lately I've just been doing puzzles instead. However, this week I checked out Galen Rowell's Mountain Light, a photography book/journal, from the library and it's full of swell anecdotes.

Before that I'd been bingeing on Iain M Banks, and needed a break. I'll probably go back and try read the second half of the Culture books soon.

squareking
03-06-2011, 04:26 PM
Finished Abhorsen by Garth Nix last night. Pretty interesting take on necromancy, magic and a slight brush against politics. Interesting trilogy, though this one felt rushed.

Going to start White Noise by Don DeLillo tonight.

Ash
03-06-2011, 04:32 PM
Just started the 4th Book in the Horus Heresy line of 40k stuff.

The Flight of the Eisenstein - James Swallow

SabreLime
03-06-2011, 04:38 PM
Dune Messiah.

Just finished Don Quixote which was an interesting read, took me a long time to get through it. It made me wish I was fluent enough to read it in Spanish, the translation was good but a lot of the wordplay simply doesn't work in English.

Dude. If you've read Don Quixote, you've got to read Monsignor Quixote by Graham Greene. It's a well-known and well-written parody/pastiche/whatever.

TrouserDemon
03-06-2011, 04:44 PM
Rereading Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand.

Engineseer
03-06-2011, 04:50 PM
Aircraft Systems by Moir and Seabridge. It's great, if you are into acronyms!

Wordwyrm
03-06-2011, 04:57 PM
Just finished Shadow Games (#4 or 5 of the Black Company series) by Glen Cook. Next I plan to read something else... I'm not really sure what.

brainboat
03-06-2011, 04:59 PM
just about finished rereading song of ice and fire in preparation for Feast of Dragons.
Those books are really good.

Shakermaker
03-06-2011, 05:11 PM
Currently I am very much enjoying Everyone loves you when you're dead (http://www.amazon.com/Everyone-Loves-When-Youre-Dead/product-reviews/0061543675/) by Neil Strauss. It is a compilation of interviews he did in the last 20 years or so. It is loosely arranged by theme so you're reading about an American psy-ops soldier on one page and about Lady Gaga on the next. Great stuff.

I am also reading Bloodlands (http://www.amazon.com/Bloodlands-Europe-Between-Hitler-Stalin/product-reviews/0465002390) by Timothy Snyder and while it is very interesting, the subject matter doesn't lend itself to lengthy reading. Every couple of pages I have to put the book down because of it gruesomeness.

tenseiga
03-06-2011, 05:17 PM
Suprisingly relevant I am reading Masters of Doom which is the story of the john carmack vs john romero saga all the way up to romero burning up with daikatana. Really decent read, very pirates of silicone valley

Plum
03-06-2011, 05:24 PM
I've just finished Black Powder War, which is the third book in the very lovely Temeraire series. I'm just starting The God Delusion, by Richard Dawkins, which is one of those books that's been on my to-do list for aaages but I've only just gotten around to :)

icupnimpn2
03-06-2011, 06:08 PM
In the Oxfam bookshop this morning I bought a copy of a Baen novel by John Dalmas entitled "The White Regiment". I do not yet have any idea whether it's any good, or indeed what it's about. I will report back soon!

Haven't read Dalmas, but if you like the White Regiment you might want to be aware that the author has made its "lost" follow-on sequel available online for free

http://www.johndalmas.com/area/Catalog/

Poindexter
03-06-2011, 07:44 PM
I've just finished volume 3(Dream Country) of The Sandman by Neil Gaiman (what? graphic novels count). Next up on my list is The Last Wish, the first Witcher novel.

Berlin
03-06-2011, 08:25 PM
Dude, you TOTALLY gotta tell me what you think about "The Last Wish", I just HAVE TO know... or maybe I'd just start a thread about it?

OK, I'm reading "Thud!" for the fourth time, that's Pratchett, and something about de Sade by an author you wouldn't even know exists, but it's about the century when our beloved Marquise was writing in. Good stuff, never knew that Cassanova was shy at first.

wahwah
03-06-2011, 10:07 PM
re-reading (listening this time actually) the Song of Ice and Fire books, and also reading The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle (http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/11275.The_Wind_Up_Bird_Chronicle) which is pretty good and weird.

Serekh
03-06-2011, 10:24 PM
The Difference Engine by William Gibson & Bruce Sterling. Only ~70 pages in and I'm completely drawn into the world. Great characters in a magnificent steampunk setting. Not to worry, that dosen't mean merely levers and crankshafts, there's more of the punk connotation (Downtrodden main character, majestic bureaucracies and ruthless politics) than the steam.

If you're a fan of Gibson, Stephenson, or Sterling I'd give it a strong recommend.

thomwong
04-06-2011, 08:58 AM
Paradise by Donald Barthelme.

Berlin
04-06-2011, 09:10 AM
re-reading (listening this time actually) the Song of Ice and Fire books, and also reading The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle (http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/11275.The_Wind_Up_Bird_Chronicle) which is pretty good and weird.

Did you read Kafka on the Shore and Norwegian Wood? Amazing things...

Yodith
04-06-2011, 12:57 PM
Did you read Kafka on the Shore and Norwegian Wood? Amazing things...

My favourite Murakami books are probably A Wild Sheep Chase and Dance Dance Dance but everything I have read by him has been utterly spellbinding.

wahwah
04-06-2011, 06:25 PM
Did you read Kafka on the Shore and Norwegian Wood? Amazing things...

Haven't read any other books by Murakami before, but they're on my list now :)

Krans
04-06-2011, 08:54 PM
Haven't read Dalmas, but if you like the White Regiment you might want to be aware that the author has made its "lost" follow-on sequel available online for free

http://www.johndalmas.com/area/Catalog/
It wasn't particularly good, unfortunately. :-( But thanks for the link anyway!

TheLastBaron
04-06-2011, 10:27 PM
I thought No Country and The Road were both incredibly good, which other books by McCarthy are good reads?

westyfield
05-06-2011, 12:33 AM
Currently reading Black Man by Richard Morgan

How are you finding it? I read Altered Carbon and loved it, but I've heard Richard K. Morgan's other books aren't so good.
Broken Angels and Woken Furies are on my list to read sometime, but I recently read A Game of Thrones (George R.R. Martin) and Revelation Space (Alastair Reynolds), so I have a fair few series to work through!

Serenegoose
05-06-2011, 01:07 PM
How are you finding it? I read Altered Carbon and loved it, but I've heard Richard K. Morgan's other books aren't so good.
Broken Angels and Woken Furies are on my list to read sometime, but I recently read A Game of Thrones (George R.R. Martin) and Revelation Space (Alastair Reynolds), so I have a fair few series to work through!

Pretty interesting. The start was kinda wobbly but it's picking up pace really rather nicely - the first hundred or so pages had a problem of too many point of view characters - we're talking five or so. Once he got concentrated on the actual meat of the book, it all swung together rather nicely and I'm fairly tearing through it. It feels more 'professional' than Altered Carbon, the technical skills seem more in evidence (despite my feelings on the beginning) - time will tell whether I find the plot equally engaging - I'm a bit under half way through as I write this, so I can't say for sure.

Jams O'Donnell
05-06-2011, 01:15 PM
Haven't read any other books by Murakami before, but they're on my list now :)
The latest Murakami (not yet released in English translation) sounds like it might have a similar tone to Wind Up Bird Chronicle, and I'm really looking forward to it. If you want more weird Murakami you can't go wrong with Hard Boiled Wonderland and The End of the World, and though Norwegian Wood is a much more straightforward story it is a lovely thing.

Berlin
05-06-2011, 01:44 PM
The latest Murakami (not yet released in English translation) sounds like it might have a similar tone to Wind Up Bird Chronicle, and I'm really looking forward to it. If you want more weird Murakami you can't go wrong with Hard Boiled Wonderland and The End of the World, and though Norwegian Wood is a much more straightforward story it is a lovely thing.

I've read two parts of IQ84 and it's pretty decent. Lots of repetitions though.

icupnimpn2
06-06-2011, 01:54 PM
Still reading the Honor Harrington series. It's been described as Horatio Hornblower in space, but I don't know how accurate that is. There's an emphasis on space battle, but mostly it's about a good officer getting the short end of the stick from insufferable jerks.

Baen allows most of the series to be distributed for free (http://baencd.thefifthimperium.com/22-MissionofHonorCD/MissionofHonorCD/). It's medium-light entertainment. A little space opera, a little popcorn.

Cable
06-06-2011, 09:11 PM
@ soupeh: just wondering what's wrong with Orson Scott Card? surely unless you know him you can only really judge his character from his books?

imirk
06-06-2011, 09:21 PM
@Cable: RE: Card-He does interviews and writes opinion pieces as well as books, oh and from his books he likes the word Jeesh :P

Úscar.
06-06-2011, 10:01 PM
Currently rereading the Foundation series. Good fun!

Hey, me too!

To all of you who enjoy sci-fi/adventure/fantasy and are tired of knights and elves, you should totally check out the Dark Tower saga, by Stephen King. It is, in King's words, what he wrote when he wanted to pay tribute to LotR. It's basically your typical "quest" story, but it features cowboys, mutants, time travelling, dr. doom, new york junkies and lots of other elements that may sound bizarre when mixed, but I promise they all are perfectly entwined and none of them feels out of place.

westyfield
07-06-2011, 01:16 AM
@ soupeh: just wondering what's wrong with Orson Scott Card? surely unless you know him you can only really judge his character from his books?

He has some rather... strong opinions on homosexuality.
I like Ender's Game, but I don't think I'd like Orson Scott Card if I met him. And apparently the Ender's Game sequels are terrible.

icupnimpn2
07-06-2011, 03:01 AM
He has some rather... strong opinions on homosexuality.
I like Ender's Game, but I don't think I'd like Orson Scott Card if I met him. And apparently the Ender's Game sequels are terrible.

He does have strong opinions on homosexuality, related to his beliefs about society and marriage. I think it's one thing to disagree with him, but he is vilified in some sectors of the internet.

But the problems with his writing are a separate issue. MANY of his stories feature precocious adolescents that are smarter than everyone around them. Not just in the Ender series. The context of the Ender series makes it believable. But in other series, in other settings, it is jarring.

That said, some of his books are excellent. Mixed bag author, though.

Serenegoose
12-06-2011, 03:42 PM
I finished Black Man and found it personally exceeded Altered Carbon, Westyfield. It was very much an enjoyable read and not what I expected from it from the blurb.

westyfield
12-06-2011, 05:07 PM
I finished Black Man and found it personally exceeded Altered Carbon, Westyfield. It was very much an enjoyable read and not what I expected from it from the blurb.

Ok, cool, I'll have to give it a read sometime. Thanks for the recommendation.

Berlin
13-06-2011, 12:39 PM
Time for Sartre's biographical essay on Baudelaire, pretty interesting and crazy reading.

TheLastBaron
13-06-2011, 09:39 PM
About to start World War Z, I have to book, but the list of people in the audio book (including Mark Hamill) sounds like it would be awesome to listen to, but I think it's also abridged.

kyrieee
13-06-2011, 09:49 PM
I started reading Dune again. I read it when I was about 13 and didn't know English all that well so it's almost like reading it for the first time again. Great book!

Ian
14-06-2011, 09:16 AM
Finished Soul Music. Not the funniest Discworld book I've read but still very readable. I've resisted the urge to power on through the Discworld books and have made a start on Black House by Stephen King and Peter Straub.

KauhuK
14-06-2011, 10:29 AM
Currently I'm reading Innocent Mage. Next book will be Black Lung Captain (Tales of Ketty Jay book 2).

lostrootpass
14-06-2011, 11:10 AM
"The Blue Nowhere" by Jeffrey Deaver. It was given to me by a neighbour.

It's about a world-class MUD player who uses social engineering to kill people in Silicon Valley.

It's not a comedy.

Kablooie
15-06-2011, 08:30 PM
The Greg Mandel trilogy by Peter F. Hamilton (currently on book 2/3). On account of having read everything else of his.

Also the free sample of the Witcher book (english translation) wasn't half bad, so I'm considering that for afterwards.

I never got any traction in the first book; it reads like it was written by another author. I greatly enjoyed all his other books, especially Pandora's Star & Judas Unchained. I'll try that Mandel book again.

Just finished The Uplift War by David Brin, for probably the 30th time or so. Some favorites I reread to tatters.

ColOfNature
18-06-2011, 01:17 AM
Alastair Reynolds' Terminal World. It's a close contest between Reynolds, Peter F Hamilton and Iain M Banks for the title of best sci-fi author alive today.

Edit:
I finished Black Man and found it personally exceeded Altered Carbon, Westyfield. It was very much an enjoyable read and not what I expected from it from the blurb.

Agreed, Black Man is Morgan's best work to date.

TheLastBaron
18-06-2011, 09:57 PM
Got Adventures of Sherlock Holmes since it was free and so far am enjoying it.

MashPotato
19-06-2011, 12:21 AM
Can't go wrong with Sherlock!

I just finished Oblivion by David Foster Wallace, and am now reading Anaethem by Neal Stephenson :)

icupnimpn2
19-06-2011, 01:09 AM
Can't go wrong with Sherlock!

Well, you can with "A Study in Scarlet"

Donjo
19-06-2011, 01:30 AM
Just finished The Windup Girl by Paolo Bacigalupi
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/1/1f/Wind_up.jpg

Reaally good sci fi, about the collapse of agriculture and fossil fuels and the rise and catastrophe of bio engineering.. won the Hugo award and the Nebula award, if you like sci fi at all I would highly recommend it :)

I just searched there, the Nebula award looks freakin awesome!

http://www.sfwriter.com/nebula1.jpg

icupnimpn2
19-06-2011, 02:00 AM
I just searched there, the Nebula award looks freakin awesome!


I never knew. It's gorgeous. Always thought of it as a designation - never considered the physical form of the award. Wow.

Donjo
19-06-2011, 02:56 AM
I never knew. It's gorgeous. Always thought of it as a designation - never considered the physical form of the award. Wow.

I want one. I'd better start writing.

http://michaelmay.us/07blog/images/0227_nebulaaward.jpg
http://www4.ncsu.edu/~tenshi/images/P4270087.JPG
http://www.janeyolen.com/Resources/nebulas.jpg
http://www.peterbeagle.com/raven/images/17may2007/Peter_and_his_Nebula.jpg

Anthile
19-06-2011, 03:00 AM
Well, you can with "A Study in Scarlet"

Why A Study in Scarlet when you can have A Study in Emerald (http://www.neilgaiman.com/mediafiles/exclusive/shortstories/emerald.pdf)?

Serenegoose
19-06-2011, 03:22 AM
Reaally good sci fi, about the collapse of agriculture and fossil fuels and the rise and catastrophe of bio engineering.. won the Hugo award and the Nebula award, if you like sci fi at all I would highly recommend it :)


Are we talking 'the catastrophe of bioengineering' like 'ME AM PLAY GOD' cautionary morality tale? If so... no thanks. Sci-fi that makes technology the villain is something I couldn't be less interested in.

Donjo
19-06-2011, 03:54 AM
Are we talking 'the catastrophe of bioengineering' like 'ME AM PLAY GOD' cautionary morality tale? If so... no thanks. Sci-fi that makes technology the villain is something I couldn't be less interested in.

No, technology is not the villain, there is no definite morality throughout the book. Here's the review that made me interested, the very first sentence of which might placate you :)
http://io9.com/5355830/gmo-espionage-fuels-environmental-thriller-the-windup-girl?tag=thewindupgirl

"Science fiction about the environment can get preachy, so Paolo Bacigalupi's hard SF novel The Windup Girl is a welcome change. Set in Thailand's future, the book follows scientist spies hunting good genomes in a world ruined by GMO diseases"

Serenegoose
19-06-2011, 04:04 AM
No, technology is not the villain, there is no definite morality throughout the book. Here's the review that made me interested, the very first sentence of which might placate you :)
http://io9.com/5355830/gmo-espionage-fuels-environmental-thriller-the-windup-girl?tag=thewindupgirl

"Science fiction about the environment can get preachy, so Paolo Bacigalupi's hard SF novel The Windup Girl is a welcome change. Set in Thailand's future, the book follows scientist spies hunting good genomes in a world ruined by GMO diseases"

Alright, consider me placated. I'm on an SF binge at the moment and that sounds like just the thing - I'd seen it in the shops a few times before but had other things in the queue ahead of it. Thanks for the recommendation :)

Donjo
19-06-2011, 04:07 AM
Alright, consider me placated. I'm on an SF binge at the moment and that sounds like just the thing - I'd seen it in the shops a few times before but had other things in the queue ahead of it. Thanks for the recommendation :)

No problem! It was recommended to me by a friend, and I think a few people might be reading this copy after me :)

Kablooie
19-06-2011, 03:51 PM
Alastair Reynolds' Terminal World. It's a close contest between Reynolds, Peter F Hamilton and Iain M Banks for the title of best sci-fi author alive today.

Have you read Singularity Sky?

Right now I'm reading "DNS & BIND - Cricket Liu and Paul Albitz".

I'm out of books to read for entertainment, bleah. Gonna get that Windup Girl, maybe.

A set of books I'd highly recommend to you is the Chung Kuo series by David Wingrove, starting with The Middle Kingdom. They are quite excellent.

ColOfNature
19-06-2011, 06:21 PM
Have you read Singularity Sky?
Oh yes, I'm a big Charlie Stross fan. In fact after I finished Terminal World I moved straight on to the Fuller Memorandum, which I finished in the wee small hours of this morning. Good stuff as ever. Next up: Mr Banks' Surface Detail.

Yes, I went on a book buying splurge on Friday. I've also got World War Z and Tony Ballantyne's Capacity waiting in the wings - I'm sure I've read something of his before, but I'm buggered if I can remember what it was...

westyfield
19-06-2011, 07:46 PM
I just started reading A Clash of Kings and oh help I have a maths exam tomorrow I need to revise but the book it calls it hungers it must be read help meeeeeeeeeee

Megagun
20-06-2011, 03:42 PM
Just finished Alastair Reynolds' Diamond Dogs, Turquoise Days. Reynolds is a very, very good writer. Sure, neither of those stories were of the epic proportions I've gotten used to associate with Reynolds' work, but they were still very enjoyable regardless.

Next up is either Reynolds' Absolution Gap or Paolo Bacigalupi's The Windup girl.

As far as the Ender's Game sequels go, Ender's Shadow is quite nice, prehaps better than Ender's Game. The characters just feel a lot more believable. Haven't read any of the other sequels, though, but I hear they're not that good.

Jams O'Donnell
20-06-2011, 03:54 PM
@serenegoose, @Donjonson

This is where I make the obligatory plug for John Brunner's Stand on Zanzibar, the best sci fi and also sort of about societal/environmental collapse. Reading it is obligatory. Then reading The Sheep Look Up is obligatory.

Kablooie
21-06-2011, 02:57 PM
If we're talking classics, I'd recommend John Brunner's Shockwave Rider :)

Xercies
21-06-2011, 04:42 PM
Just finished A Clash Of Kings, hmm not as strong narritvily as A Game of thrones i think(a lot of it does seem to be set up) but it does have a nice pace and Tyrion seems to be the main focus which is a good thing because he is a really good chaarcter. Not sure where this is going to be honest which compounds the narritive issue but is quite nice feeling to be honest. Nothing goes quite like you expect. But this isn't a good book to do what i'm doing and wait a year before buying the third book since I do feel it is set up.

Serenegoose
23-06-2011, 05:05 PM
Picked up The Windup Girl today - was going to grab A Game of Thrones but I'm fickle enough to abstain based on the fact the only copies in the store had rubbish covers. I'll wait til the good covers are back first.

airtekh
27-06-2011, 12:17 PM
Homicide by David Simon.

I just happened to spot this in a bookshop the other day, and I recognised the author's name as being the creator of The Wire, which is basically my favourite TV show ever.

It's fascinating so far.

Ian
27-06-2011, 02:15 PM
Well after about 50 pages stuff looks like it might finally be about to happen in Black House. Which is good, because I was going to give it another 50 before ditching it.

Jams O'Donnell
27-06-2011, 03:33 PM
I've jumped on the Windup Girl bandwagon, though I'm rather underwhelmed so far. If it doesn't improve soon I'm going to switch. Maybe to some Lovecraft, since the Mrs is always trying to get me to read some.

Serenegoose
28-06-2011, 02:05 AM
I've jumped on the Windup Girl bandwagon, though I'm rather underwhelmed so far. If it doesn't improve soon I'm going to switch. Maybe to some Lovecraft, since the Mrs is always trying to get me to read some.

Contrarily, I also started it today and am hooked by 60 pages in. Funny how subjective tastes go.

Kablooie
28-06-2011, 02:10 AM
I'm re-reading Halting State by Charles Stross.

For some reason the EVE crisis reminded me of it. I guess because it was another example of how virtual world events can result in RL consequences.

ColOfNature
28-06-2011, 03:05 AM
About 3 pages into World War Z - I've been putting it off. I really want to enjoy it but I'm a bit worried I won't, for reasons I can't quite pin down.

Serenegoose
28-06-2011, 03:25 AM
I'm re-reading Halting State by Charles Stross.

For some reason the EVE crisis reminded me of it. I guess because it was another example of how virtual world events can result in RL consequences.

Just in time for Rule 34 to be out in a little over a week.

Rii
30-06-2011, 02:22 AM
Started on Stephen Donaldson's Lord Foul's Bane, first entry in his Chronicles of Thomas Covenant series, and am about to simultaneously embark on Tales of Soldiers and Civilians by Ambrose Bierce.

icupnimpn2
02-07-2011, 01:36 PM
Started on Stephen Donaldson's Lord Foul's Bane, first entry in his Chronicles of Thomas Covenant series, and am about to simultaneously embark on Tales of Soldiers and Civilians by Ambrose Bierce.

Book 1 is my least favorite. I've read 5 1/2. There is some really great stuff in there, but Covenant is the least interesting part of the series that bears his name.

squirrel
02-07-2011, 04:31 PM
The Swarm by Frank Schatzing. A very very long sci-fiction about most of the sea creatures suddenly join force to wage war on human beings. Very inspiring. It's written in German so feel free to pick one translated in your own language. I read the Chinese one and it's so amazing. Mr. Schatzing even spent a lot of time trying to educate us some basic knowledge of marine environment throughout the whole book.

Another one being Confession by John Grisham. A complaint against the corrupt law enforcement, prosecution and judicial system abusing the power of capital punishment. The fact Mr. Grisham tried carefully to hide his political point of view towards capital punishment itself (himself a Democrat) however leading to failure of the fiction to explore into the core of the issue.

The Innocent
02-07-2011, 05:59 PM
@Matthew10

The Winter's Tale by Shakespeare? If not, one of my favorite books of all time is Winter's Tale by Mark Helprin. It's absurdly good.

Currently I'm reading The City and the City by China Mieville. Also The Windup Girl.

Serenegoose
02-07-2011, 07:30 PM
I really have to start checking out China Mieville.

Rii
02-07-2011, 09:58 PM
Book 1 is my least favorite. I've read 5 1/2. There is some really great stuff in there, but Covenant is the least interesting part of the series that bears his name.

mmm, that's unfortunate. My 'to read' pile is rather too high to give the series more than one book to endear itself to me, but we'll see how we go. Currently - only ~150 pages in - I would describe myself as 'engaged but not enthralled'.

Gerbick
02-07-2011, 10:01 PM
Still reading The Complete Short Stories of JG Ballard. Still effing good stuff.

icupnimpn2
04-07-2011, 06:44 PM
mmm, that's unfortunate. My 'to read' pile is rather too high to give the series more than one book to endear itself to me, but we'll see how we go. Currently - only ~150 pages in - I would describe myself as 'engaged but not enthralled'.

It may be worth sticking it out. I really enjoyed the first two books of the second series (books four and five). The setting and other characters of the Land are better developed after book one, and you may find your endearment there. The series has some of the best giants I've read, and the Bloodguard/Haruchai are pretty awesome. From time to time when reading other fantasy novels I find myself thinking back to some of the scenes of these books. Or when sitting randomly. I wish I could see some of them brought to life ala Lord of the Rings. There are moments of excellence, excitement, and fear. But Covenant endears to no one.

Xercies
04-07-2011, 06:59 PM
Quite near to finishing Perdido Street Station by China Meville, quite good world building i have to say, though he did do the same problem that i encountered in The City and The city where he brings out all these things and only kind of explains them later. Unfortunately because this book is full of alien races you never truly get an idea of which alien race is like except maybe a few of them. Thankfully he does explain a lot during the book so if your confused at first you start being a bit less confused by the end. Plus there is a gripping narritive through it, yeah would definitly recommend this book and would probably put china meville as a writer I really like.

Ondrej
07-07-2011, 02:08 PM
"The internet is a playground" by David Thorne. It's like reading a modern classic, if you know what I mean (and I don't know that myself). http://www.27bslash6.com/tiiap.html

Firkragg
07-07-2011, 08:00 PM
Okay, from reading through the pages so far, the authors I've jotted down on my "Sci-Fi-authors-to-look-for" list, is Alastair Reynolds and Peter F. Hamilton. Honor Harrington by David Weber sounds interesting as well.

Just finished Xenocide by Orson Scott Card and is looking very much forward to reading Dune, by Frank Herbert.
Currently read all the Culture books by Iain M. Banks and the Hyperion Cantos by Dan Simmons (though I wish I'd only read the first two, the last were a bit of a letdown to me).

Any other great sci-fi authors to add to the list? *Waits expectantly with stone and chisel*

Ondrej
07-07-2011, 08:05 PM
Okay, from reading through the pages so far, the authors I've jotted down on my "Sci-Fi-authors-to-look-for" list, is Alastair Reynolds and Peter F. Hamilton. Honor Harrington by David Weber sounds interesting as well.

Just finished Xenocide by Orson Scott Card and is looking very much forward to reading Dune, by Frank Herbert.
Currently read all the Culture books by Iain M. Banks and the Hyperion Cantos by Dan Simmons (though I wish I'd only read the first two, the last were a bit of a letdown to me).

Any other great sci-fi authors to add to the list? *Waits expectantly with stone and chisel*
I feel like stating the obvious, but - Douglas Adams.

mrpier
07-07-2011, 08:58 PM
Stanislaw Lem, Asimov, Donaldson (The gap series), Kim Stanley Robinson (Red, Green, Blue Mars) oh, and Arthur C Clarke :-)

ColOfNature
07-07-2011, 09:17 PM
Charles Stross, Jon Courtenay Grimwood, Vernor Vinge, China Mieville, Richard Morgan (well, Altered Carbon and Black Man anyway), Brian Aldiss, Ken MacLeod.

Splynter
07-07-2011, 10:31 PM
Don't forget Philip k. Dick, and William Gibson!

Edit: Also, not reading anything right now, as I have an exam to get through and don't want to be occupied when the next Song of Ice and Fire releases next week.

Skull
07-07-2011, 11:12 PM
Been reading The Coincidence Engine by Sam Leith. Only 50 pages in and its yet to really suck me in but I'll keep at it. Gotta give kudos to the Peggle and PvZ reference.

Xercies
08-07-2011, 12:58 PM
Ian Mcdonald is a really good sci-fi author. My next book that I will buy is probably going to be The Dervish House by him, really loved Rivers of God.

Firkragg
08-07-2011, 01:17 PM
Much obliged gents, this list should last till Christmas :)

And just to add to the list, also read most of the WH40k Horus Heresy books, bought the first in the series on a whim, Horus Rising by Dan Abnett, expecting cheap sci-fi only to be very positively surprised by how well written it was. A good read if you are into military science fiction. And if following superhuman soldier fanatics doesn't tickle your fancy, the Gaunt's Ghosts series is also a very good read for a simple soldiers perspective. Also by Dan Abnett - just about anything from Mr. Abnett is worth a read when it comes to WH40k.

Jams O'Donnell
08-07-2011, 03:16 PM
I assume we have lots of Iain M Banks readers in here. Are any of his non-M books worth reading? I can't tell if I like him for his writing or for the concept of the Culture.

EndelNurk
08-07-2011, 03:40 PM
I love Whit, The Wasp Factory and The Bridge. Cannot comment on the rest as I haven't read them.

Xercies
08-07-2011, 06:01 PM
A question, as someone who read The Algerabist and really didn't like it, is his culture novels similar in style? I mean I keep hearing good things about it but I don't want to get it since I really didn't like that novel.

ColOfNature
08-07-2011, 06:50 PM
I'd say The Algebraist is different enough from the Culture novels that you might take a punt on them. They're very obviously from the same author, what with the bizarre aliens and grand scope, but the tone is quite different. The Algebraist is fairly baroque, the Culture stuff tend to revel in its hyper-tech and omnipotent AIs second-, third- and fourth-guessing everyone. Get Excession if you like that kind of thing. I'd also recommend Use of Weapons - it's harder going than Excession, with its unusual narrative structure, but rewarding for all that.

Serenegoose
08-07-2011, 08:09 PM
I'd say The Algebraist is different enough from the Culture novels that you might take a punt on them. They're very obviously from the same author, what with the bizarre aliens and grand scope, but the tone is quite different. The Algebraist is fairly baroque, the Culture stuff tend to revel in its hyper-tech and omnipotent AIs second-, third- and fourth-guessing everyone. Get Excession if you like that kind of thing. I'd also recommend Use of Weapons - it's harder going than Excession, with its unusual narrative structure, but rewarding for all that.

Yes, this - my girlfriend tried reading the algebraist recently but couldn't get through it but she loves the culture series - I didn't dislike the algebraist but I am far more into the culture series also. I have a copy of Transition (published as Iain Banks without the M) but I've yet to get through it yet, so unfortunately I can't say if novels under that name are as good, sorry!

corbain
14-07-2011, 01:34 AM
I just finished "Infinite Jest" (with a break halfway through to devour "Game of Thrones")

I'm going to read a study guide for IJ next, and might follow that up with "Clash of Kings".

After that I think i will read Per Petterson's "I Curse the River of Time"

Kablooie
14-07-2011, 04:12 AM
I'd like to recommend a rather quirky but enjoyable read, likely out of print (but available on Amazon and used book stores) : Sudanna, Sudanna, by Brian Herbert (son of the author of Dune). It's really different and odd, but it's one of the books that stuck with me for many years, the story was memorable, I mean. It does read like classic sci-fi, similar to Harlan Ellison's works (surprised none's mentioned him yet).

Finished Shogun by James Clavell last week, and currently re-reading The Sea is Full of Stars, by Jack L. Chalker. It's one of his Well of Souls books, which I also highly recommend. In fact, I've never read anything by him that I disliked. He also wrote And the Devil Will Drag You Under, another fun read.

TimA
14-07-2011, 09:34 AM
Well I was recently introduced to Neil Gaiman's Sandman. So I ended up buying Absolute Sandman Vol. 1, I've never read anything like this before, and I'm blown away. Spectacular, brilliant.

Similar
14-07-2011, 10:42 AM
Sandman really is brilliant. I wish I had them all.

Just finished rereading Gibson's Neuromancer for what must be the 40th or 50th time (it's one of those novels I reread whenever I don't have anything else handy or I don't know what I feel like reading. I got it around 1990 or so).
Before that I read Donaldson's The Gap series (having read the fourth novel maybe fifteen times, but never the others) and a number of Banks', mostly Culture series, but also The Algebraist (as others have hinted, it's not as ... 'sharp' as most of the Culture novels. I still thought it was good, but it didn't grab me quite as much as his books normally do. I'm glad it wasn't the first I read by him).

DainIronfoot
14-07-2011, 12:09 PM
I am starting to read the Foundation series.

Harlander
14-07-2011, 02:31 PM
I lately finished Feed, first book of the Newsflesh Trilogy. It's about bloggers in a post-zombopocalypse world, and pretty cool.

Now I'm reading Naomi Klein's The Shock Doctrine, a heartily depressing non-fiction book about the implementation of Chicago school economic policies.

Man Raised By Puffins
15-07-2011, 10:07 AM
I am starting to read the Foundation series.
As am I. Picked up a lovely moth-eaten, dog-eared box set of the trilogy for £2.50 (second hand, obv.) a while back and just starting to get stuck in now.

Still got Tip & Run on the go too, an equal parts fascinating and horrific account of the Great War in Africa, though the true focus is on the attritional grind to secure German East Africa (modern Tanzania).

Re Iain Banks' non-SF stuff: The Crow Road is probably my favourite, nice and comfy generational saga. Also worth reading: Espedair Street, The Business, Complicity, The Bridge.

Tikey
15-07-2011, 02:17 PM
I'm in the middle of A happy world.
It's interesting how the advances in genetics kinda make you realise how the book has aged. It's a great book but certainly a creature of its time.

ColOfNature
16-07-2011, 12:00 AM
Transmetropolitan. I first read it years ago when a bloke I shared a flat with had almost the full set - he wouldn't let me touch them if he wasn't in the room, he was like that about his comics (and if I'd referred to them as "comics" he'd have taken a fit), but I must've read them four or five times. Recently I *ahem* acquired *ahem* the whole lot electronically, and I'm smitten all over again. I <3 Spider Jerusalem. It's the only graphic novel series I can read again and again.

mrchinchin25
16-07-2011, 03:59 PM
Close to halfway through Dance with Dragons, the latest in the Song of Ice and Fire series. Phew.... That's all I say. It's good...

westyfield
17-07-2011, 12:05 AM
I just got back from nearly two weeks' holiday, so I had plenty of reading time. Finished A Clash of Kings, read A Storm of Swords 1 & 2, and am currently about halfway through The Windup Girl. It took a while to get into - perhaps 60-80 pages - but once I'd got used to the setting and writing style I found I enjoyed it much more.

As for sci-fi authors, Peter Watts is pretty good. I've only read Blindsight, but it's a must-read in my opinion. A really great hard, dark sci-fi book. I plan on reading the Rifters series after I've finished the current batch of books (still got Redemption Ark by Alastair Reynolds to read yet).

EOT
17-07-2011, 11:13 AM
The Rifters books are great. Pretty dark stuff too. He made them free in ePub format almost as soon as they came out. I read them all on my phone, not the ideal way admittedly but now I want hard copies.

As for myself; I've just finished Douglas Adams' ''The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul'' and am about to move on to Ken MacLeod's ''Learning The World'' and then Georgie M's ''A Dance with Dragons''.

I'm also sort of reading ''A Roadside Picnic'', the book that inspired S.T.A.L.K.E.R.

Cardinal
17-07-2011, 04:48 PM
Atlas Shrugged, Ayn Rand
- an acknowledged inspiration for Bioshock (http://littlebobeep.com/2010/bioshock-ayn-rand/) - good reading for the recession.

archonsod
18-07-2011, 06:18 PM
Working my way through George McDonald Fraser's Flashman books. And thoroughly enjoying it.

TheLastBaron
18-07-2011, 06:56 PM
Was looking through the free classic books for Kindle and picked up The Man Who Was Thursday, so far liking it.

The Innocent
18-07-2011, 07:09 PM
Ooo, I love The Man Who Was Thursday. I read it as a teenager and didn't understand it at all. Read it again a couple years ago and it made tons more sense.

Finished The City and the City by China Mieville this morning. I've heard that the ending is divisive, but I found it to be both enjoyable and appropriate of the world that Mieville had created. This was my first time reading one of his books, and I may have to check out some of his others. Any suggestions?

DukeOfChutney
18-07-2011, 07:18 PM
Sea Harrier over the Falklands by Sharkey Ward is my current read. Its good if you want to read some British Jingoisim and internal forces politics.

ColOfNature
18-07-2011, 07:53 PM
This was my first time reading one of his books, and I may have to check out some of his others. Any suggestions?
The Bas-Lag series are fantastic - read them in order for best effect (Perdido Street Station, then The Scar, then Iron Council) but they're pretty much stand-alone. My favourite was The Scar, but they're all good. Un Lun Dun was a fun read, even if it is a kids' book. I got stuck a few pages into Kraken and ended up returning it to the library, but that was probably my fault.

westyfield
18-07-2011, 11:10 PM
Working my way through George McDonald Fraser's Flashman books. And thoroughly enjoying it.

I saw Flashman on the shelf in a bookshop a while ago and thought it looked interesting, but didn't buy it. I'll have to give it a try sometime.

solipsistnation
19-07-2011, 08:07 AM
I assume we have lots of Iain M Banks readers in here. Are any of his non-M books worth reading? I can't tell if I like him for his writing or for the concept of the Culture.

His writing is generally good enough that he's interesting even when he's writing about some Scots dude coming of age or whatever.

Wasp Factory: YES. Look, just read it.

Walking on Glass: A little on the experimental side, still decent. Tries to be clever, mostly is.

The Bridge: Fantastic. Arguably a crypto-Culture novel (and not even in the way that since the Culture is out there all his mainstream fiction is secretly Culture novels). Has a happy ending, but it shows up in another book entirely and is only mentioned in passing. Highly recommended.

Espedair Street: Rock biography, and I always like those, even though it's a little lighter than he tends to be. I like rock bios.

Canal Dreams: Basically dreck and not worth bothering with unless you're really desperate and stuck in an airport or something.

Complicity: Not bad, not great.

Whit: I liked it, but it wasn't terribly heavy reading or anything. Interesting ideas that he doesn't do as much with as he could.

A Song of Stone: More experimental than most-- heavy on the style. Actually one I haven't re-read.

The Business: Again, a little light and kind of forgettable.

Dead Air: Post-9/11 something-or-other that I honestly haven't bothered reading. Even the Iain (M) Banks mailing list I'm on mostly gave it a pass.

The Steep Approach to Garbadale: Kind of a Crow Road reprise-- coming-of-age thing, not bad, nothing to write home about:

Transition: Wasn't this SF? Hm. I liked it-- a return to form I think, although not to the extent that Surface Detail was.

...so there you go. For comparison, I loved Use of Weapons and Consider Phlebas more than Player of Games, really liked Feersum Endjinn, generally enjoyed Against A Dark Background, found Excession interesting but not as awesome as other Banks fans, and enjoyed Inversions and the other newer Culture novels.

DukeOfChutney
19-07-2011, 12:53 PM
"Wasp Factory: YES. Look, just read it."

agreed wasp factory is a good book

if your into space opera, i'd say Alistair Reynolds revelation space series are the best going, particularly chasm city
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Chasm-City-Alastair-Reynolds/dp/0575083158/ref=sr_1_10?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1311076355&sr=1-10

ColOfNature
19-07-2011, 01:02 PM
And Reynolds' latest, Terminal World, is awesome.

Web Cole
19-07-2011, 01:50 PM
Almost finished A Dance with Dragons, not sure what I think of it tbh.

ichbinspikeface
19-07-2011, 11:45 PM
i too felt clash of kings seemed more like a promise of good things (nasty things?) to come, and i can promise you after reading the second part/book of storm of swords that the payoff is swearwordingly amazing.

sinister agent
20-07-2011, 02:23 AM
Ooo, I love The Man Who Was Thursday. I read it as a teenager and didn't understand it at all. Read it again a couple years ago and it made tons more sense.

Every time I play Deus Ex, I tell myself "I really must get round to reading that". It's not even on The Pile yet, shamefully enough.

Currently reading the Tenant of Wildfell Hall, and about to start on Dracula on the side for a miniature book club thing that may or may not be a ploy to touch a lady person on the bottom.

Wildfell Hall is great so far, I have to say. It's pretty much the inverse of that horrible romantic crap that the rest of the Brontes peddled, where the male lead is an abusive tosser but deep down he's ever so lovely, and if a woman will just accept enough of his bullshit then he'll magically change. Makes me sick, that does. But in this, the "good on the inside" romantic character is, like his real life counterpart, actually an abusive dickbag who ruins the lives of everyone he meets. PUNCHLINE HERE.

Joseph
20-07-2011, 02:36 PM
I've just finished reading Metro 2033, which I thought was fantastic. I got a little burnt out with it towards the end but then when the last few pages actually come it's just brilliant.

Not sure what I'm going to read next though, I've got this book called Twelve which is about vampires during Napoleonic times which I reckon I'll be giving a gander.

TheLastBaron
21-07-2011, 07:58 PM
Was going to read Dance With Dragons but my friends told me its not that great so it's been moved down the queue a little, about to start reading Finch by Jeff VanderMeer

Serenegoose
23-07-2011, 11:51 PM
Currently reading Rule 34, by Charles Stross. I am addicted to this guys writing style.

corbain
24-07-2011, 03:13 AM
Was going to read Dance With Dragons but my friends told me its not that great so it's been moved down the queue a little, about to start reading Finch by Jeff VanderMeer


Alec just tweeted he didn't enjoy Dance With Dragons which is a little disconcerting as his complaints are ones that are nagging at me already, and i've only just started Clash of Kings- namely that it is a soap opera written by a dirty old man, and intellectual candy floss.

I'm thinking of treating the series as something to be read slowly, the books interspersed with something a little weightier (between GoT and CoK i read Infinite Jest, but perhaps that's taking weighty a little too literally), not in one greedy, indigestion inducing feast. Hopefully by not overindulging I won't get GRRM overload, as I loved the first book and want to love the rest of them.

Xercies
24-07-2011, 10:34 AM
that it is a soap opera written by a dirty old man

You have to have some kind of soap operishness, characters drama and all that because thats what connects us to the the story and fills the story, otherwise it would be a bit short. Thats how TV series and all that kind of stuff have so many seasons.

The dirty old man thing though I can't really deny, he does like to have his sex scenes. Though I have to say the TV people are a little bit more dirty since they seem to put random sex scenes that weren't in the book and are a little bit distracting and not needed.

Stormbane
24-07-2011, 12:15 PM
The dirty old man thing though I can't really deny, he does like to have his sex scenes. Though I have to say the TV people are a little bit more dirty since they seem to put random sex scenes that weren't in the book and are a little bit distracting and not needed.

“Sex is one of the most wholesome, beautiful and natural experiences that money can buy.”
–Steve Martin

westyfield
24-07-2011, 10:26 PM
Alec just tweeted he didn't enjoy Dance With Dragons which is a little disconcerting as his complaints are ones that are nagging at me already, and i've only just started Clash of Kings- namely that it is a soap opera written by a dirty old man, and intellectual candy floss. [snip] Hopefully by not overindulging I won't get GRRM overload, as I loved the first book and want to love the rest of them.

If it's any consolation, I read A Clash of Kings and A Storm of Swords back to back, and loved them both. The constant sex is a bit annoying AND IN THE BOOK and I understand that it's a bit exploitative ("What's that? You like this character? Well how about I kill them, haha! Wait, you like this character as well? Dead! Hahahahaha! And this one! And that one!") but it doesn't bother me that much. Overall I'm still very much loving the books, and I'm not bothered that they're not intellectually stimulating - if I wanted to learn something or be challenged I'd read a different book.

icupnimpn2
25-07-2011, 02:49 AM
If it's any consolation, I read A Clash of Kings and A Storm of Swords back to back, and loved them both. The constant sex is a bit annoying AND IN THE BOOK and I understand that it's a bit exploitative ("What's that? You like this character? Well how about I kill them, haha! Wait, you like this character as well? Dead! Hahahahaha! And this one! And that one!") but it doesn't bother me that much. Overall I'm still very much loving the books, and I'm not bothered that they're not intellectually stimulating - if I wanted to learn something or be challenged I'd read a different book.

Years ago, my mother accompanied me and my wife out of town to look at some houses around a school where I had been accepted. She had forgotten her reading material so I lent her a book that I hadn't yet read but that was being very heavily promoted at that time as the start of the next, greatest fantasy saga.

A year later, my wife and I stopped at a gas station when visiting with my mother. She went inside to pay and I picked up her romance novel out of curiosity. I started reading random parts to my wife and she was laughing. Then my mother came back and went on the defensive. She was upset, like I had violated a private part of her life. I told her I was sorry but that these romance novels are cheesy. She said, "I know what kinds of books YOU like to read!" and gave me a horrified, indignant, angry look.

Never let your mom read a book you haven't read first. Like A Clash of Kings.

Track
25-07-2011, 04:29 PM
I have A Game Of Thrones sitting on my sidetable, but I keep putting off actually reading it. I started, and about a chapter in I knew that I didn't have the time or patience at that point to keep track of what was happening in the story. Never went back to it once I actually had the time.

Also, just finished reading Catcher In The Rye. Loved the writing itself, but I found myself getting infuriated with the main character a bit too often. I just really wanted him to shut up sometimes. That being said, it's certainly a good book, with some brilliant sections.

Plankton
27-07-2011, 10:31 AM
I've had about 3 or 4 years where I barely read any novels - a real shame, I confess. Though, recently I started spending some time on reading.
Already forgot the title of the last book I finished. Some story about Neanderthals that survived in a cave system below the North Iranian desert and from there started to infiltrate modern human society... pretty stupid XD

Now reading some old history book (from the early 60s) on the Russian Revolution that I found in my parents' library.
I am also reading the German translation of Blood of Elves by Andrzej Sapkowski, better known as the first novel in the Witcher series. Before that I read the 2 short story collections The Last Wish and Sword of Destiny. Really having fun with those. (and I haven't even finished the first game)
And finally, I am reading "Ausser Dienst" by Helmut Schmidt, former Chancellor of West Germany. It's giving me some really interesting perspective on things.

Serenegoose
28-07-2011, 06:06 PM
Finished Rule 34 - very easy to read compared to Halting State, felt more pacey and slickly done. Rather enjoyable.

Now started The Name of the Wind, because many friends recommended it to me - the writing style is interesting. Deliberately personable, even when relating 'big picture' details, it sort of feels a bit like Tolkien but without being incredibly dry. Lots of singing and poetry and subtlety and dark portent means it's feeling a lot like the opening of the Fellowship, but again, without being meandering or dry.

icupnimpn2
28-07-2011, 11:09 PM
Now started The Name of the Wind, because many friends recommended it to me - the writing style is interesting. Deliberately personable, even when relating 'big picture' details, it sort of feels a bit like Tolkien but without being incredibly dry. Lots of singing and poetry and subtlety and dark portent means it's feeling a lot like the opening of the Fellowship, but again, without being meandering or dry.

Ehhh it's okay. My wife liked it more than I did. It irked me that the author is writing the main character as "a master storyteller" and the real story is what the master storyteller in the book is telling the people around him. It's a bit like boasting, really. If the author was a painter instead, his painting would be of someone painting "the best painting ever."

I wrote a 2-star review on Amazon complaining about the impossibility of the story within the story actually being told within a single night, as it supposedly was.

Nit-picker? Me?

Serenegoose
28-07-2011, 11:23 PM
Errr, well unless you spoiled it, it pointedly takes 3 days. Not one night. It's the first thing Kvothe basically points out to the Chronicler. That there's no way he can do it in less than 2 days.

Also I don't recall Kvothe describing himself as a master storyteller - indeed when he begins, he asks the chronicler how one should tell the story, faffs around a bit trying to find the beginning, and eventually gets started? But then I'm only on page 112.

Rii
29-07-2011, 12:49 AM
Finished with Bierce and moved on to The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo. I may not have read the book before the film as is required in white culture (http://stuffwhitepeoplelike.com/2009/07/13/127-where-the-wild-things-are/), but I'm reading it before the other film!

Incidentally, I notice that almost all of Bierce's tales are set in America despite Bierce spending time in England. This stands in interesting contrast to Poe who never ventured outside America but who set most of his tales in one European nation or another anyway. I wonder if the difference might not merely reflect the idiosyncrasies of two men but also the evolution of American identity across the period separating them. I don't know enough about the literature of the period to do more than wildly speculate, of course.

Similar
29-07-2011, 01:57 AM
Rereading "The Turing Option" by Harry Harrison and Marvin Minsky. It's ... sort of interesting, but feels like they had a lot of thoughts about how real AI could be done and what it could be used for, so they gathered all those thoughts and tagged a not all that convincing crime story onto it. The whole thing is a tad stilted.

icupnimpn2
29-07-2011, 11:05 PM
Errr, well unless you spoiled it, it pointedly takes 3 days. Not one night. It's the first thing Kvothe basically points out to the Chronicler. That there's no way he can do it in less than 2 days.

Also I don't recall Kvothe describing himself as a master storyteller - indeed when he begins, he asks the chronicler how one should tell the story, faffs around a bit trying to find the beginning, and eventually gets started? But then I'm only on page 112.

I can't remember the exact words he uses, but I think he was talking about being Edema Ruh and what that means for his storytelling skills. Anyway, it must have been somewhere, cuz a random person on a random other forum also discribes him as a self-proclaimed master storyteller. (dsw13, a random person on a random other forum also discribes him as a self-proclaimed master storyteller.)

Didn't mean for it to be a spoiler, but the three planned books of the series are supposed to correspond to "the three days necessary to tell the tale." It kind of says "The Kingkiller Chronicle: Day One" on the title page. Kvothe is such a master storyteller that of course he knows exactly how long his amazing tale takes to tell. You may have heard of him. Here's a non-spoiler part of my Amazon review to lay out my gripe with the length of the tale:


The main conceit of this book is that the main character, Kvothe, is telling his own tale to other characters in the book. Kvothe - a self-proclaimed master storyteller - declares that he will speak of his past experiences in three parts, or over the course of three days - of which this book comprises the first.

This is pretty much impossible.

If we take all of Kvothe's narration to be "as he spoke it," then there simply isn't enough time in the day for a person to comfortably tell this tale. I won't link out to it, but the Audible version of the Name of the Wind audio book clocks in at 27 hours and 58 minutes.

Now, not the entire book is comprised entirely of Kvothe's telling. There are framing sequences set in the book's present day that make up anywhere from 10-15% of the text. But even taking account for that, the characters in the book aren't depicted as spending 24 hours of that first day solely on listening to Kvothe's telling. There are other events taking place that take up time, and the characters do go to sleep at night.

A true master storyteller wouldn't be rush, rush, rushing to get through his life story. Pacing, gestures, and facial expressions would all be a part of the experience. So we shouldn't believe that the characters were speaking and acting really, really fast. And indeed, the audio book's runtime confirms what I'm saying.

That leads me only one explanation: Rothfuss has made a freshman mistake. This book is too long, his time frame too short. For me, it has affected both the story's believability and my perception of the main character's credentials. So much is boasted about Kvothe's abilities. Many reviewers have mentioned that the character is overblown. Here is real evidence that the character was credited with too much! And yet I doubt that Rothfuss will correct this mistake in his next book, which takes place during the second of three days of telling. If anything, I expect the page count to blossom, as the author is buoyed by his fledgling success.

Kablooie
30-07-2011, 03:57 PM
And Reynolds' latest, Terminal World, is awesome.

I think my favorite Reynold's book is The Prefect. I was crazy about it when I first read it, re-reading it now.

Throwing all my unwanteds into a bag for trade in at the local used book store. Gleaned some suggestions from here, and also copied down some author's names from two books titled The New Space Opera. I can't recommend those two, though -sorry fellas (the compilers), but the short story format is not a proper space opera, imo.

Any more I'm back into hardcore SciFi (as I was as a kid). Burned out on fantasy, and I wish people would get over the softcore vampire porn - it's clogging up the shelves. Any suggestions in the hard scifi arena (modern) welcomed.

ColOfNature
30-07-2011, 04:28 PM
Greg Egan does proper hard sci-fi. Get Schild's Ladder and Incandescence if at all possible.

BlueJohn
02-08-2011, 11:30 AM
hey im reading Big Brother the orwellian nightmare come true at the moment, round 3/4 way through. It looks at in today's society how george orwell's 1984 book has pretty much happened with cameras that can pick you out of thousands of people or from your supermarket club card collecting data on what you buy to then be sold on to company's or even you health insurance to see if you're eating healthy or to put up your premium.

pretty eye opening to just realize how much we are watched by government agencies, from the library books we take out to software that can turn your phone mic on when its off to listen in on your conversations

Kelron
02-08-2011, 12:07 PM
I'm taking a break from sci fi for now, currently half way through Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell by Susanna Clarke. Really enjoying it, it's set in an alternate history 19th century, where magic is real but no longer practiced, only studied by historians. The plot concerns its revival by the titular gentlemen, and is all written in the style of a book from the time, but manages to do so without becoming tedious or heavy reading.

mrpier
02-08-2011, 01:04 PM
I remember I found the first 100 pages or something of Jonathan Strange quite slow going, but then something happened, don't know if the pace quickened somewhat or if I just got used to the style, anyway I now think it is a most splendid book and I'm glad I persevered.

laneford
02-08-2011, 02:02 PM
A Visit from the Goon Squad (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Visit-Goon-Squad-Jennifer-Egan/dp/1780330960/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1312289977&sr=8-1) by Jennifer Egan.

Which is a bloody brilliant, technically wonderful, sparkling and powerful novel. The best thing I've read the last few years.

Quetzal
03-08-2011, 03:04 PM
The Machine Crusade by Frank Herbert

icupnimpn2
03-08-2011, 04:39 PM
I remember I found the first 100 pages or something of Jonathan Strange quite slow going, but then something happened, don't know if the pace quickened somewhat or if I just got used to the style, anyway I now think it is a most splendid book and I'm glad I persevered.

I enjoyed it from the start but couldn't get my wife into it. The narrative doesn't build, build, build into an action crescendo like a Harry Potter novel. Instead, the pacing is slower and events take place over a long period of time. You catch glimpses of the characters' lives through the years. Each chapter is almost a vignette. And most are interesting or amusing if not spellbinding.

It's more like real life in that way. There's very little that ties my high school years and early college years into the present story of my life. I'm still the same person, but time has passed, things change. The pacing of life slows down and speeds up and slows down and speeds up.

I'm kind of a dork. I found myself enjoying Jonathan Strange enough that I put the book aside three or four years ago and still haven't finished it. There's no sequel or anything just yet, and the author took eight years to write this one. Yes there are some short stories by the same author (and some tie into the same world), but really if you read this there's nowhere else to go. The prospect of not having more to read saddens me, so I have laid up the book as a treasure for the future. I think I will begin it again soon, though, and take it to completion.

ColOfNature
03-08-2011, 06:53 PM
The Machine Crusade by Frank Herbert
Ye gods, do people actually read that stuff? It's not Frank Herbert - in fact the old guy is probably spinning in his grave at what his son and Kevin J. Anderson (ptui) have done to his legacy.

It's nice to know someone else likes Jonathan Strange - I loved it, but I haven't managed to get anyone to read more than a little of it.

icupnimpn2
03-08-2011, 07:37 PM
It's nice to know someone else likes Jonathan Strange - I loved it, but I haven't managed to get anyone to read more than a little of it.

Since Susanna Clarke doesn't have much else in her bibliography, does anyone have suggestions of what to read if you've enjoyed Jonathan Strange? I imagine some would say Neil Gaiman, but I haven't enjoyed his work as translated to film and so haven't ventured into the books.

I'd recommend Herminie Templeton Kavanagh's Darby O'Gill. Tor fantasy sells a version that has been "textually regularized for modern readers." (http://www.amazon.com/Darby-OGill-Herminie-Templeton-Kavanagh/dp/0765354624) I picked it up for cheaps at a discount book sale after beginning Jonathan Strange and felt like I was putting my foot back into familiar waters. There's a Kindle version available on Amazon that shares reviews for the Tor version, but I think it's a public domain release and may not have the same modernization.

ColOfNature
03-08-2011, 07:53 PM
Definitely try Gaiman - I haven't seen any of his film work except Beowulf, so I can't really say how it compares to his written work, but Neverwhere is a good entry point if you liked Strange, it has a comparable combination of whimsy and darkness. Good Omens has a similar tone, but with added Pratchett (always a good thing). Anansi Boys is less dark, and American Gods is less whimsical - it's a dense read but probably the best of the bunch.

Edit: also, I said this elsewhere:

Also, Vellum and Ink (collectively The Book of All Hours) by Hal Duncan. A kaleidoscopic, non-linear story of a war across multiple realities between Angels and ancient Gods, and the refugees from and conscientious objectors to the conflict. I'm not even going to try to summarise it any further than that, but I urge you to read it.
They're pretty different from Strange, but excellent stuff.

Nalano
03-08-2011, 07:53 PM
Amitav Ghosh, River of Smoke

Has nothing to do with computers, gaming or our specific subculture. Mostly deals with creole languages and the Opium Wars. But that's what I'm reading at the moment.

Rii
03-08-2011, 08:17 PM
Finished with Bierce and moved on to The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo. I may not have read the book before the film as is required in white culture (http://stuffwhitepeoplelike.com/2009/07/13/127-where-the-wild-things-are/), but I'm reading it before the other film!

Ok, now I remember why I mostly stick to sci-fi: the banality, ze goggles do nothing!

Great film, and I'll be checking out the Fincher version too, but there we part, k? Sorry Mr. Larsson.

So, scratch that. I've moved on to Stephen Baxter's Flood and the works of one H.P. Lovecraft. I am tired of hearing the adjectival form of the latter gentleman's name and knowing not of what is being alluded to.

Berlin
03-08-2011, 09:22 PM
Finished "I Shall Wear Midnight" a couple of days ago and now I'm going through "Neuromancer". Both perfect.

Ethyls
03-08-2011, 09:33 PM
I'm currently reading The Picture of Dorian Gray. Don't know why I hadn't thought of it sooner, it's brilliant.

Cable
03-08-2011, 09:45 PM
@Ethyls
yea it really is, i just finished it so i won't say anything spoilerish but yea it was amazing

Plankton
03-08-2011, 10:05 PM
I'm currently reading The Picture of Dorian Gray. Don't know why I hadn't thought of it sooner, it's brilliant.


@Ethyls
yea it really is, i just finished it so i won't say anything spoilerish but yea it was amazing
Im about to start reading it too ^^

westyfield
03-08-2011, 11:13 PM
I read the Picture of Dorian Grey whilst on holiday last year. Really really good - if you haven't read it, read it.

I'm currently reading Redemption Ark by Alastair Reynolds. Great stuff.

Megagun
03-08-2011, 11:17 PM
Also reading Redemption Ark. Indeed, great stuff. :)

Kelron
03-08-2011, 11:33 PM
Definitely try Gaiman - I haven't seen any of his film work except Beowulf, so I can't really say how it compares to his written work, but Neverwhere is a good entry point if you liked Strange, it has a comparable combination of whimsy and darkness. Good Omens has a similar tone, but with added Pratchett (always a good thing). Anansi Boys is less dark, and American Gods is less whimsical - it's a dense read but probably the best of the bunch.


American Gods is my favourite of his full novels, but Stardust, The Sandman (his graphic novel series) and some of his short stories have more in common with Strange. Smoke & Mirrors is a nice collection of short stories, there's also Fragile Things which I can't remember much of and Angels & Visitations which I haven't read.

icupnimpn2
04-08-2011, 12:29 AM
American Gods is my favourite of his full novels, but Stardust, The Sandman (his graphic novel series) and some of his short stories have more in common with Strange. Smoke & Mirrors is a nice collection of short stories, there's also Fragile Things which I can't remember much of and Angels & Visitations which I haven't read.

I hated Stardust: The Movie, though. Felt it was smarmy and inauthentic. It's one of the reasons I haven't tried reading Gaiman. Am I throwing the baby out with the bathwater?

Kelron
04-08-2011, 02:28 AM
I didn't much like the movie either, the book is better but I mainly suggested it because it of the Victorian-style fairytale theme. You definitely shouldn't let it put you off Gaiman, I suggest reading Neverwhere, Good Omens or American Gods first then try the others if you're still interested.

outoffeelinsobad
04-08-2011, 05:45 AM
American Gods is superb. My sister just got the 10th Anniversary Edition at a signing, and some passages are supposedly more long-winded, which is awesome.

I'm reading The Left Hand of Darkness by Ursula K. Leguin. She's done a remarkable job so far.

Pace
04-08-2011, 06:31 AM
I thought American Gods was great taken two pages at a time. I mean, it was full of these almost stand-alone little sections which were often brilliant. Like mini short stories or just extended descriptions of situations or places. As a whole I never quite figured out what it was supposed to add up to, but Gaiman is obviously an incredibly talented writer.

Xercies
04-08-2011, 09:50 AM
I really loved Stardust the movie and it pretty much got me into Geiman, though I wish Ricky Gervais would die in a fire in that movie.

Bob_Bobson
04-08-2011, 10:52 AM
Approriately enough to the username above I'm reading "Persian Fire" an account of the rise of Persia and some of its attempts to spread into Greece.

Ian
04-08-2011, 10:54 AM
American Gods: Excellent.

Stardust: Much better than the film. Unless the whole premise annoyed you then it's a not-unreasonable guess that much of the stuff you liked least in the film was added while adapting it.

I'm on the home stretch of Black House. It took an age to get going but once it finally did it's a good read.

Shane
04-08-2011, 12:17 PM
Just finished A Dance with Dragons, the series has been pretty much ruined for me.

Althea
04-08-2011, 02:01 PM
I finished Prince of Thorns (The Broken Empire #1) by Mark Lawrence this morning, so it's back to Jasper Fforde's The Eyre Affair (Thursday Next #1) and Elizabeth Moon's Engaging the Enemy (Vatta's War #3).

I didn't enjoy Prince of Thorns all that much, if I'm honest.

mrchinchin25
07-08-2011, 10:05 AM
Finished reading Consider Phlebas (Iain M. Banks) - loved it. Of his books, already read Look to Windward, and I've got Player of Games on the shelf ready to read "soon".

Currently reading Killing Rommel by Stephen Pressfield - really like his writing style, and this makes a change for him with it not being about ancient greece or people pushing trees over with shields. Also it feels like an accurate depiction of how a world war would be so chaotic and pretty mental. Half-way in so we'll see.

Future projects - er too many at the moment but the shortlist -

- Malazan books, I'm up to Bonehunters (read once already but will need a re-read) and have got Reapers Gale ready to go on the shelf
- Player of Games
- The Heroes (Joe Abercrombie- need to buy it first)
- Warlord Chronicles (Bernard Cornwell) - re-read, already read the 1st so 2 more to go

Thats the shortlist anyway - the full list keeps getting longer...

Chaz
07-08-2011, 12:42 PM
Just finished reading The Hyperion Omnibus: Hyperion by Dan Simmons. Don't think I'd read any of his stuff before, quite different from the usual space opera stuff. Makes a nice break from the more straight laced sci-fi by the likes of Peter Hamilton, Neal Asher and Ian Banks etc.

Other recent good reads have been:

The Quiet War, Gardens of the Sun (Paul McAuley) Very good sci-fi writer, I'd recomend any of his books.
The Lies of Locke Lamora (Scott Lynch) Kind of sci-fi fantasy with magic and technology but with a renaissance style setting, but without really focusing on any of it. Very good I thought.
Left Hand of God (Paul Hoffman) Sort of fantasy setting, but more alternate medieval. Again very good, looking forward to the sequel.

As well as the Sci-fi stuff I also like a good dose of history. Quite into reading about the age of sail and Napoleonic era at the moment.
Just finished reading "Cochrane the Dauntless: The Life and Adventures of Admiral Thomas Cochrane, 1775-1860" by David Cordingly. Thomas Cochrane is generally thought of as being the real life inspiration for characters like Hornblower and Jack Aubrey.

If you only read one book about the age of tall ships, then read this one "Storm and Conquest: The Battle for the Indian Ocean, 1808-10" by Stephen Taylor, it is absolutely brilliant and I hope he writes something again sometime soon.

Other good history books and writers I like would have to include:

Max Hastings
Antony Beevor
Mark Urban (I highly recommend "Rifles" and "Fusiliers")
The Battle: A New History of the Battle of Waterloo (Alessandro Barbero) Very good and accessable account of the battle at Waterloo. Some Napoleonic stuff can be a bit stodgy but this is pretty pacy.
Empires of the Sea: The Final Battle for the Mediterranean, 1521-1580 (Roger Crowley) I also highly recommend this one. Not a heavy read but packed full of action and amazing facinating stuff about life, politics and warfare in the Mediterranean during that period. I knew being a galley slave sucked, but I didn't know how badly until I read this. Also the white slave trade. Hundreds of thousands of people from the coasts of Europe were captured and sold into slavery in the Middle East, and entire coastlines could be left desolate. Yet whilst we hear a lot about the African slave trade we rarely get to hear or read about this one.

Anyway, currently awaiting from Amazon:

The Endymion Omnibus (Dan Simmons) The next two parts to Hyperion.
Red Seas Under Red Skies (Scott Lynch) sequel to Lies of Locke Lamora
The Technician (Neal Asher) Can't think of any other writter that currently does action packed sci-fi better. Big bad ass guys with big guns vs even bigger aliens, great stuff.
Seafaring Women: Adventures of Pirate Queens, Female Stowaways, and Sailors' Wives (David Cordingly) Yep, more maritime history.

Nullkigan
07-08-2011, 01:08 PM
I need to buy an ebook reader as I'm running out of shelf space.

Recently finished Dance with Dragons and Wise Man's Fear (King Killer Chronicles/Name of the Wind book 2). Minor spoilers follow, moreso for Dance.

Interestingly, they were essentially opposites.

Wise Man's Fear had an absolutely fantastic first half that had me laughing out loud in several places and was a pleasure to read. The second half was much duller as the author indulged in setting up hooks and throwing events straight at Kvothe rather than letting him simply work himself into and out of an entertaining corner. The Fae diversion was particularly odious. The very end of the book picked up again, but the third volume is going to be extremely cramped if even half of what was outlined in the first couple of chapters of book one is going to actually happen.

Meanwhile, Dance was comparatively dull even though it was about the more interesting half of the cast. Davos is a terrible character. He's a former smuggler, knighted and turned King's Hand, yet he's about the only character in the entire series with an uncompromising sense of honour and duty and thus never does anything interesting at all. Jon and Dany spend their time making stupid teenager mistakes, whilst Tyrion sort of floats around discovering new plotlines. Things get much better 2/3rds of the way through when events start to come to a head again and the last few chapters were actually very good. Hopefully this is the end of the period Martin originally wanted to skip entirely and the next book will be back on form and stop using cliches quite so much.

Next on my list is Anathema. I'm also keeping an eye out for the next Scott Lynch book as I liked both Lies and Skies. I should probably finish the third of Bakker's Prince of Nothing series, but I find I simply don't care for it. It really should be more of my sort of thing than it is.

The Innocent
09-08-2011, 02:51 PM
Just finished The Windup Girl by Paolo Bacigalupi, and loved it. There were a few parts that were hard to get through due to their imagery, but the effect was intended and I'm glad I powered through. The ending caught me off guard in the best of ways, and I'm definitely hungry for more from Bacigalupi.

For now though, I'm taking a recommendation from this forum and reading Perdido Street Station by Mieville. I've heard mixed reviews, but I liked The City and the City, so I'm looking forward to it.

The Mechanical Aggressor
10-08-2011, 01:33 PM
Just finished A Dance with Dragons. I expected more to be resolved in Dance with Dragons considering it's such a large book. There are so many plot-lines open and Martin seems to be adding a dozen more with each book. I hope he gets to tie up all the loose ends.

I'm currently reading American Gods by Neil Gaiman. It's interesting reading it after having read Terry Pratchett's Small Gods as they are based on a similar concept. I think I will be reading more Gaiman when I finish it.

Berlin
10-08-2011, 07:42 PM
Collection of short-stories of Harlan Ellison, damn - this guy's mind is amazing. No wonder he won every award possible.

@TheMechanicalAggressor
Definitely read some more Gaiman, this guy's great. You can go on with his short-stories first and try to avoid Neverwhere (or whatever it's called).

Althea
10-08-2011, 08:07 PM
@TheMechanicalAggressor
Definitely read some more Gaiman, this guy's great. You can go on with his short-stories first and try to avoid Neverwhere (or whatever it's called).
I liked Neverwhere. It wasn't stellar, sure, but it was a good read.

Berlin
10-08-2011, 11:23 PM
I liked Neverwhere. It wasn't stellar, sure, but it was a good read.

One of those Gaimans I've read in translation - may be the point. Terrible one for me.

Track
11-08-2011, 02:55 PM
Neverwhere is one of the few books that I quit on. Not because it was terrible, but I just stopped reading it one day and whenever I thought about picking it back up, I realized that I just really did not want to continue reading it. A lot of his other stuff is really fantastic, though.

Xercies
11-08-2011, 05:38 PM
I really loved Neverwhere to be honest, it was quite a clever concept, which is to be honest with me Neil Geimans MO

Kadayi
14-08-2011, 10:38 PM
Just finished off Dances with Dragons (I took my time..after it's not like the next book is going to arrive in a year or so). Albeit it was great to catch up with the various Denizens of Westeros on their travels and travails, I have to say that Martins ambitions in terms of the number of characters he employs coupled with the myriad locations introduced means that development in terms of plot was chronically slow, Vs that of the earlier books. Although he seems to have gotten over the hurdle of the Meereen Knot, he's also opened up a raft of other plot lines at the same time, that you have to kind of question in terms of overall relevance in the long term. Much as it was great to see ***** again and that *** off on a quest to find ****** on the **** of ****** (if you've read it you know what I mean), you have to wonder how relevant the prize is to the overall given the prize was pretty much secondary to the overall upto now.

Also way, way, way too many characters in Meereen in Danys court to keep tabs on, especially with the similar sounding names. It's hard to get invested in the fate of people when half the time you're having to refer to the back pages to figure whose who, and why you should care. Similarly with the Wall there were too many marginal characters popping up here and there when the reality is it should of just revolved around a half dozen or so.

Anyway here's hoping he squeezes the next one out sooner rather than later. I get the impression the Meereen knot was the big obstacle. Hopefully with that out of the way, things can speed up a little.

Althea
18-08-2011, 01:42 PM
I just finished Leviathan Wakes by Daniel Abraham & Ty Franck (Under the name of James S.A. Corey). It's a pretty good space opera romp.

So tonight, or later today, I'll be starting on Spellwright by Blake Charlton.

Jams O'Donnell
18-08-2011, 01:58 PM
I'm reading a few Lovecraft stories to appease the Mrs since I've been promising to read them for ages, but really I'm just reading them so I my conscience is clear for me to can dig into thousands of pages of chesy fantasy -- the Song of Ice and Fire books have caught my interest after watching the HBO show.

Jockie
18-08-2011, 02:09 PM
I read Jims book in its online version during a really slow week at work, just finished it this afternoon. Thought provoking stuff, there are quite a few areas of the book where it would be interesting to see his updated thoughts, Jim's grand ideas of online spaces that are improved as people play and emergent gameplay are looking increasingly like a grim hope in the face of this next wave of MMO's and the successes of Facebook style of connected play.

Now looking for something fictiony to get my eyes around, thinking I might give Snow Crash a go.

Krans
18-08-2011, 02:47 PM
I'm reading Kings of the North by Elizabeth Moon.


Now looking for something fictiony to get my eyes around, thinking I might give Snow Crash a go.

Do it! :-D

imirk
18-08-2011, 04:38 PM
Reading Snow Crash, so far so good :D

cjlr
19-08-2011, 01:43 AM
You guys have pretty good tastes!

I've been working my way through the Nebula and Hugo winners, myself - like, over the last few years, in no particular order, and with many breaks. It's a long-term goal. I'm actually only a little better than halfway there - 30 odd out of 80 odd. Next up are the Einstein Intersection by Samuel Delany and Man Plus by Frederick Pohl (the cover of that one looks like Avatar: The Book, even though I have the 1982 edition). I have a few more in the stack under that, but I don't remember what they are. The Moon and the Sun, maybe? Barryar and the Vor Game?

I am also reading this book (http://www.amazon.ca/Hippies-Saved-Physics-David-Kaiser/dp/0393076369/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1313714280&sr=8-1). It's a winning combination.

icupnimpn2
19-08-2011, 05:40 AM
I've been working my way through the Nebula and Hugo winners, myself - like, over the last few years, in no particular order, and with many breaks. It's a long-term goal. I'm actually only a little better than halfway there - 30 odd out of 80 odd. Next up are the Einstein Intersection by Samuel Delany and Man Plus by Frederick Pohl (the cover of that one looks like Avatar: The Book, even though I have the 1982 edition). I have a few more in the stack under that, but I don't remember what they are. The Moon and the Sun, maybe? Barryar and the Vor Game?

Working through the Hugos is a noble pursuit. Keep in mind that Barrayar is a sequel, and the Vor Game is even further down the line. The publisher, Baen, has made all books in the series free for distribution online.

Barrayar was republished along with the first book in the series, Shards of Honor, as the omnibus Cordelia's Honor. You can download it in multiple formats at http://baencd.thefifthimperium.com/24-CryoburnCD/CryoburnCD/Novels/Cordelia's%20Honor/index.htm

Similarly, the omnibus Young Miles contains the full-length tale Warrior's Apprentice and the short story Mountains of Mourning, both of which precede the Vor Game.
http://baencd.thefifthimperium.com/24-CryoburnCD/CryoburnCD/Novels/Young%20Miles/index.htm

All of the other books in the series are available at
http://baencd.thefifthimperium.com/24-CryoburnCD/CryoburnCD/

The author has said the stories can be read in any order, but I really enjoyed reading them chronologically the first time through. They all have something to offer. Start with Shards of Honor from Cordelia's Honor and then plow on through. Moreso than the rest of the series, Shards of Honor and Barrayar are very connected, and the latter will be missing some context if read apart.

Fumarole
19-08-2011, 10:35 PM
A Canticle for Leibowitz by Walter M. Miller, Jr.

An Anonymous Source
20-08-2011, 01:42 PM
I just finished Leviathan Wakes by Daniel Abraham & Ty Franck (Under the name of James S.A. Corey). It's a pretty good space opera romp.

Oooh yes. Leviathan Wakes isn't very deep, but it's compulsively readable. Nearest thing to a blockbuster film I've read in a long time - and I mean that in a good way,

Reading this a the moment,

184

Xercies
20-08-2011, 02:13 PM
Currently Reading Matter by Iain M Banks. He does like his info dumps in this story, a lot of times he will compltly stop the story to explain something technological, or what the character has been up to which isn't very well done. Also he does have a tendency to go "In the blahdibly balhbody do sector on the planet showaddywoddy there was two aliens that I'm not going to describe to you very well" Also he has a tendency to say alien names and not explain what they are. Anyway despite those problems it is engaging enough and I would quite like to see where the story goes.

Althea
20-08-2011, 04:03 PM
Oooh yes. Leviathan Wakes isn't very deep, but it's compulsively readable. Nearest thing to a blockbuster film I've read in a long time - and I mean that in a good way
Agreed. I enjoyed it, and it's likely one of the better reads released this year, but it's not for everyone.

Kadayi
20-08-2011, 05:14 PM
Currently reading 2 books (both non fiction): -

The Hero with a Thousand faces by Joseph Campbell

Generally referenced a lot when people talk about the original Star Wars as a large influence on George Lucas. Essentially Joseph Campbell was an expert on Mythologies from across the world and boiled them all down to their commonalities to come up with the principles of the Heroes Journey.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monomyth

Only into it a chapter or two, but it's pretty interesting reading, especially how he contextualizes the rationale to the Heroes Journey and the underlying purpose of it with respect to the changing role of the individual within early society as a parallel to the traditional rites of passage, that mark the becoming of an adult.

What's struck me the most so far is actually how as society has moved on (and we've started to live longer) and everyday life is now less about survival (for the 1st world at least) those rites of passage have kind of become, if not meaningless then obscured in a way.

101 Things I Learned in Architecture School by Matthew Frederick

Just interesting to read another persons perspective on design and some of the important lessons they've learnt. It's fairly punchy with small illustrations/diagrams to highlight each point.

Doodier
20-08-2011, 05:36 PM
Flashbacks by Timothy Leary. It's his autobiography and it is really interesting even thought I'm reading it slowly and intermittently.. If the stories in this book are real then I would call him the coolest professor ever :)

Wooly Wugga Wugga
20-08-2011, 07:27 PM
I'm about 200 pages into Iain M. Banks Surface Detail. I'm really starting to miss the days when he wrote awesome space opera or imaginative fiction under his pseudonym. The last two books of his that I read have been the clumsiest metaphores for "The Bankers and Assorted Unfettered Capitalist Swine Are EVIL!!!" that I have ever read. He lacks the subtlety to do it effectively and instead comes across as a bit of a whinging little tool. We get it, we really do. Please move on so that I can enjoy you again. What happened to the dude who wrote Feersum Enjin, The Use of Weapons, The Wasp Factory and The Bridge? Can he come out and play now?

Kelron
20-08-2011, 10:25 PM
I enjoyed Surface Detail, but found Matter boring. Transitions was pretty good too, but I agree that his earlier books are much better.

Recently read Surely You're Joking Mr Feynman, I can't say a lot about it except to read it if you haven't. The man led an interesting life, and it's full of entertaining stories. Also finished Agent Zigzag, a biography of the WW2 double agent Eddie Chapman. It sounded far fetched from the blurb, but was surprisingly believable and seems well researched, if embellished a little for the sake of storytelling.

Kaira-
21-08-2011, 12:23 AM
Recently I've been reading PHP A Beginner's Guide and 13 Things That Don't Make Sense by Michael Brooks. The latter is quite interesting, and is quickly becoming one of my favourite "light" readings regarding science among The Universe in a Nutshell and series of books by Finnish astronomer/atheist Esko Valtaoja. Shame that his books haven't been translated to English, since they are quite light to read but still have a lot of substance.

An Anonymous Source
21-08-2011, 12:58 AM
Agreed. I enjoyed it, and it's likely one of the better reads released this year, but it's not for everyone.

Have you ever read some of Abraham's other stuff? His Long Price Quartet is excellent and one of the best stuff I've ever read regardless of genre. Lovely and harsh at the same time. That being said, it's extremely different than Leviathan Wakes.

Althea
21-08-2011, 07:43 AM
Have you ever read some of Abraham's other stuff? His Long Price Quartet is excellent and one of the best stuff I've ever read regardless of genre. Lovely and harsh at the same time. That being said, it's extremely different than Leviathan Wakes.
Only The Dragon's Path.

icupnimpn2
23-08-2011, 07:46 AM
Finished Keith Laumer's The Compleat Bolo. (http://www.amazon.com/Compleat-Bolo-Keith-Laumer/dp/0671698796) Then moved to the shared universe book Honor of the Regiment: Bolos 1. (http://www.amazon.com/Honor-Regiment-Bolos-Keith-Laumer/dp/0671721844/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1314081631&sr=1-1)

Bolos are super-tanks that eventually gain intelligence greater than humankind. But they are programmed for war with a strong sense of honor and are sympathetic characters. Kinda far out stuff. All are available from Baen as digital editions. Many have been out of print for a while.

While Compleat Bolo is a collection of Laumer's stories, the later books are written by different authors. Both are very uneven but have an interesting spark. I liked the epistolary format for two of the tales in Compleat Bolo.

CuervoJoe
23-08-2011, 04:58 PM
I've just finished some Lovecraft books (Shadow Over Innsmouth, Call of Cthulhu), and am now reading The House On The Borderlands, by William Hope Hodgson (Written in 1906, he died in WWI :(, I think the world lost a splendid writer), it's excellent Lovecraftian horror, really, really well written.

ColOfNature
05-09-2011, 04:30 AM
I just finished reading Blindsight by Peter Watts (http://www.rifters.com/real/Blindsight.htm). It's licensed under Creative Commons, so there's no excuse for not going and reading it right this minute, sci-fi fans. It's grrrrrreat. I read it in a single sitting, which I rarely do any more.

westyfield
05-09-2011, 11:20 AM
I just finished reading Blindsight by Peter Watts (http://www.rifters.com/real/Blindsight.htm). It's licensed under Creative Commons, so there's no excuse for not going and reading it right this minute, sci-fi fans. It's grrrrrreat. I read it in a single sitting, which I rarely do any more.

Great Scott, one sitting? It took me a few days of solid reading to finish that one. Brilliant book though, everyone should read it.

I just finished Redemption Ark by Alastair Reynolds - absolutely amazing. The Revelation Space series and Blindsight are some of the best sci-fi I've ever read, and probably the best hard sci-fi.

ColOfNature
05-09-2011, 01:45 PM
Alastair Reynolds is, to my mind, probably the best sci-fi author writing today. I did think while I was reading it that Blindsight read a bit like a Reynolds, with maybe a hint of Stephen Baxter. I'll have to go look up his other work to see if the comparison holds.

Lukasz
08-09-2011, 06:26 PM
Today I downloaded Left Behind series (1-3) I don't think I can buy them anywhere in my country.

I heard about this series before and the premise seemed interesting so I finally decided to give it a try. I am only half way through the first book (reading on computer ain't that fun) but I love it. Exciting and makes you think. Few things are a bit dated of course (the book is 15 years old) but it does not lose the message. I hope the series continues to be as good as the first half of first book. Probably going to import it from USA or UK site.

Cable
08-09-2011, 09:09 PM
right you've convinced me i'll go read blindsight. I'm also reading douglas adams' hitchiker's guide to the galaxy series and i'm currently on the 4th book of the trilogy. I think the best way to describe it is gloriously insane (or inane), i'm enjoying it though.

Rii
08-09-2011, 09:35 PM
Still working on that Lovecraft fellow, also Star Maker by Olaf Stapledon.

Also today I ordered Mara Hvistendahl's Unnatural Selection after reading her piece (http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2011/06/27/where_have_all_the_girls_gone?page=0,0) in Foreign Policy magazine:


Then I looked into it, and discovered that what I thought were right-wing conspiracy theories about the nexus of Western feminism and population control actually had some, if very distant and entirely historical, basis in truth. As it turns out, Western advisors and researchers, and Western money, were among the forces that contributed to a serious reduction in the number of women and girls in the developing world.

ford
09-09-2011, 07:19 AM
Reading Don Quixote for the first time, Edith Grossman's translation. At first the prospect of reading Don Quixote seemed incredibly daunting, but I've been loving it so far. It's by far the most clever book I've read.

Xercies
09-09-2011, 11:14 AM
@Cable

I think your going to be surprised about the 5th book especially after the 4th one the tones are so wildly different they could be made by a different author.

Donjo
09-09-2011, 11:35 AM
Reading Neuromancer again, seein as I'm playing DE:HR...

ColOfNature
09-09-2011, 12:08 PM
Glasshouse by Charlie Stross. Not as easy to read as his other stuff, but probably the deepest in terms of themes. Things like identity, conformity, peer pressure, gender, domestic violence, religion. You know, all that good stuff.

icupnimpn2
09-09-2011, 01:19 PM
@Cable

I think your going to be surprised about the 5th book especially after the 4th one the tones are so wildly different they could be made by a different author.

I don't remember much about the 5th book at this point except having been turned off by it when I was 11 years olf.

Has anyone read the 6th book done by the author of Artemis Fowl? I've flipped through it in a store but felt like it was the silly parts without any of the insightful, biting cynicism. Maybe that's just my bias against any writer trying to fill Adams' shoes, but what I read didn't ring true or at least didn't excite me.

Cable
09-09-2011, 01:30 PM
@Xercies
I think the 5th book was written much later than the first four so that could make sense. I look forward to being surprised.

@icupnimpn2
I haven't read it but my 2 cents would be that I really like eoin colfer but i guess i don't see the point in him trying to write someone else's books or at least in his style. Surely everyone should just write their own things? or was it a money grab?

icupnimpn2
10-09-2011, 04:45 AM
Who can truly comprehend another man's heart? I think Adams influenced a generation or two and Colfer may be an honest fan. I've never read Artemis Fowl. Is there enough in it for adults to stay interested? As a low-water mark, I'm not very impressed with Harry Potter.

Xercies
10-09-2011, 10:04 AM
Its actually pretty decent, the first book is really quite good. It is a bit kiddy yes I have to say but the characters are pretty good and as a teenager the fact that the title chaarcter was actually the villian was quite novel in my eyes.


Has anyone read the 6th book done by the author of Artemis Fowl? I've flipped through it in a store but felt like it was the silly parts without any of the insightful, biting cynicism. Maybe that's just my bias against any writer trying to fill Adams' shoes, but what I read didn't ring true or at least didn't excite me.

I kind of liked it, it doesn't have totally the greatness of what Douglas Adams does and it doesn't really have much silly Hitch hiker guide notes which were a delight. But its still quite entertainingly funny, just pretend that its in an alternative universe to the others and I think you will enjoy it.


I think the 5th book was written much later than the first four so that could make sense.

Yeah it makes sense, something must have happened to him as well because lets just say the whole book is pretty bleak and depressing.

Megagun
10-09-2011, 12:38 PM
I just finished Redemption Ark by Alastair Reynolds - absolutely amazing.
Just finished it myself, too. It was, indeed, quite a good book.

That said, I felt that the last 80 pages or so were rushed. It felt a lot like the author was on a deadline and had to end the story quickly so that he could start writing on the next book in the series (Absolution Gap). A shame, because Reynolds works best when he writes 10 pages where an ordinary Sci-Fi author would write 1.

Now reading Absolution Gap. Better read that now that my memory of the universe and characters is still fresh. :)

Cable
10-09-2011, 01:07 PM
My opinion on Artemis Fowl is what Xercies said. I haven't read them since I was a teenager but i found their ideas original and an it was an intriguing world with clever and funny writing but they're probably a bit kiddy maybe not even as grown up as harry potter (in the later books at least).

westyfield
10-09-2011, 01:30 PM
Just finished it myself, too. It was, indeed, quite a good book.

That said, I felt that the last 80 pages or so were rushed. It felt a lot like the author was on a deadline and had to end the story quickly so that he could start writing on the next book in the series (Absolution Gap). A shame, because Reynolds works best when he writes 10 pages where an ordinary Sci-Fi author would write 1.

Now reading Absolution Gap. Better read that now that my memory of the universe and characters is still fresh. :)

Yeah, I agree that it felt a bit rushed towards the end.
(Spoilers below, highlight to see)
Much of the second half of the book felt like it was leading up to the epic confrontation between Clavain and Skade (backed up by the other Conjoiners). Then the next chapter begins with 'Then Clavain woke up and the battle was over'. I was quite disappointed, but not enough to sour the experience of reading an otherwise great book.

I was two pages into A Feast For Crows, then bought Terminal World and started that instead. It's an enjoyable read so far - the setting is lovely; a tower-city where each level is at a different stage of industrial development, all the way up to the Celestial Levels which are inhabited by transhuman angels.

TaBuNiW
10-09-2011, 03:11 PM
Genki (http://genki.japantimes.co.jp/index_en)

Highly recommended, very informative and entertaining.
(Though, only if you want to learn japanese)

icupnimpn2
10-09-2011, 03:35 PM
Yeah it makes sense, something must have happened to him as well because lets just say the whole book is pretty bleak and depressing.

Maybe it had something to do with Adams conversion by Richard Dawkins to "radical atheism." Adams spent much of the last decade of his life focused on environmental concerns such as protecting endangered animals. Unlike him, I know I'll play with the dodos again someday in heaven.

icupnimpn2
10-09-2011, 04:15 PM
What? Life without faith is a cold, harsh place? Really? Or was environmentalism the depressing thing?

Wasn't entirely serious but I do think they're related. When you're so sure there's no life after this one that you look around and try to fight a battle against the slippage of time and entropy, it's gotta be pretty depressing. There, another species gone forever. There, another. Everything drifting away and lost. You want to just freeze everything and preserve it, but you can't.

It's noble to try to make that difference, but how do you think it feels to be the little boy with his tenth finger in the dam when you see another leak pop up out of reach?

Certainly atheists find joy in their lives. I know quite a few. But in Adams' case I can at least suspect a connection between his growing conviction that there is no deity and his growing passion for environmental conservatism that maybe introduced some bleakness in his later writings.

ColOfNature
10-09-2011, 04:22 PM
Oops. I just deleted that post as on reflection I think my instant, hackles-up defensiveness was off topic and unproductive. That's a discussion which quickly derails every thread it rears its ugly head in, and this is still quite a focussed and useful one. I'd be appalled if I was responsible for its implosion. I take your point though.

(As an aside, although I appreciate his insight and academic accomplishments, I can't help but feel that extended proximity to Dawkins might have a deleterious effect on ones outlook. He just rubs me the wrong way.)

Rii
10-09-2011, 04:28 PM
Maybe it had something to do with Adams conversion by Richard Dawkins to "radical atheism.

'Radical' in what sense?

icupnimpn2
10-09-2011, 04:31 PM
It didn't come across as too defensive to me :) I know some people that are very prickly. Just felt you were raising a legitimate question/criticism.


'Radical' in what sense?

By his own description: (http://www.atheists.org/Interview%3A__Douglas_Adams)


AMERICAN ATHEISTS: Mr. Adams, you have been described as a “radical Atheist.” Is this accurate?

DNA: Yes. I think I use the term radical rather loosely, just for emphasis. If you describe yourself as “Atheist,” some people will say, “Don’t you mean ‘Agnostic’?” I have to reply that I really do mean Atheist. I really do not believe that there is a god - in fact I am convinced that there is not a god (a subtle difference). I see not a shred of evidence to suggest that there is one. It’s easier to say that I am a radical Atheist, just to signal that I really mean it, have thought about it a great deal, and that it’s an opinion I hold seriously. It’s funny how many people are genuinely surprised to hear a view expressed so strongly. In England we seem to have drifted from vague wishy-washy Anglicanism to vague wishy-washy Agnosticism - both of which I think betoken a desire not to have to think about things too much.

Rii
10-09-2011, 04:39 PM
Ok; I was wondering if you were perhaps using the term synonymously with 'militant', 'fundamentalist' or similar, where those are appellations I could see fit for Dawkins but was unaware of any such applicability to Mr. Adams' atheism.