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Rii
07-06-2011, 08:07 PM
To borrow another thread from ye abandoned and decaying forums of olde.

Films are like games minus interactivity. Predictably, certain luddites out there continue to engage with this antiquated art form; more surprising, perhaps is that these unfortunate individuals are continued to suffer to walk freely amongst society. Yet it would be remiss of us if they were not at least offered a chapel in which to confess their sins. This is that.

So here's me of late:


Moulin Rouge: A masterful production offering up a veritable feast of audiovisual delights. The colours, the music, the editing, Nicole Kidman! And yet, I wasn't able to get into it. The film is sheer fairytale spectacle, but what of it? I've been able to relax and give myself over to such productions before - Disney's 'Beauty and the Beast' remains a firm favourite - so what was different this time? The film does lag somewhat in the second reel, but I don't think that's it. No, it's not you, MR, it's me. Maybe I just wasn't in the right frame of mind. Or, more worrisome, perhaps there was a childlike spark in me that has gone out of late. Either way, it irks me, and thus Moulin Rouge offers up a rare instance of my head being more charitable towards a film than my heart.

Never Let Me Go: There's a wonderful sense of austerity and solemnity pervading every aspect of this film. It's set largely in provincial England, and indeed it is difficult to imagine it being set anywhere else. The male member of the trio of characters whose journeys define the film is particularly intriguing in his passivity. It's an unusual and welcome role for a male character to assume in the context, but one which - in combination with certain other characteristics of the film - creates some problems. Specifically, the unceremonious and almost unmourned death of the most active and complex member of the trio in the second reel creates a vacuum that the film subsequently struggles to fill. And not just because the character in question was played by Keira Knightley. The concept underlying the film of children raised as future organ donors is intriguing and affecting, if totally implausible as presented. It's unfortunate that the film declined to explore it further, perhaps fearing to distract from the core character story. If done well, however, I think the two could have reinforced one another, strengthening a film whose second half falls rather short of the brilliant first. Still, it's a worthy film.

The Wrestler: The least of Aronofsky's films, I fear. There are intriguing ideas wafting about here concerning performance and reality, from the casting of ex-boxer Mickey Rourke to the nature of professional wrestling, to the relationship between Rourke's character and stripper Cassidy, to the roles assumed in the course of more 'normal' employment and parenthood. And none of it ends tidily. The performances and script are superb, the characters and events they detail heartbreakingly human, and now having written all this I'm not sure why I didn't like it. Is it the wrestling? I think it might be. That sort of casual, visceral violence for entertainment has always left a sour taste in my mouth. Great.

How I Ended This Summer: Seen at the recommendation of an RPS member. Unfortunately I can't say that I enjoyed it. Great setup, drags a bit, then blech. There's a lot of ambiguity as to the motivations and actions of the characters at certain points in the film, and I think that's meant to contrast with the mechanical regularity of their actual functions at the station and thereby make some kind of point. But it just doesn't work and the film doesn't even have the good grace to kill either of its two significant characters. It's a pity; the Arctic research station and its surroundings make for an intriguing and hauntingly photographed setting, but I just didn't get this one.

Certified Copy: I'm a sucker for this sort of thing, I really am. Usually, though, there's some sort of reality underlying the multilayered dialogue. I'm not sure that's the case here. And I'm sure that's the point. Maybe there is a consistent explanation which accounts for all the dialogue in the film - I've read some well-argued theories - but even if there is I don't think scrabbling to find it is what we're meant to do upon leaving the theatre. It's a very human thing to do, though. I need to see this again. And not just for Juliette Binoche's remarkable performance.

8-bit
07-06-2011, 08:22 PM
I watched the x-men film (Michael Fassbender for the new James bond please), its as good as the first two but there are a few things that bothered me.

1/ the 'mutant and proud' slogan, I know that the franchise has always had this link to certain movements but that was cringeworthy.
2/ the black guy dies first.
3/ besides prof x, Magneto, Raven and Sebastian Shaw the other mutants are basically just there as furniture.

Xercies
07-06-2011, 08:35 PM
Pink Floyd's The Wall - It basically is a surreal music video, also god damn it Bob Geldof did you really have to sing one of my favourite songs...you bloody butchered it. Also I had no real clue what was going on with the visuals in this it seemed very psychedelic and didn't really go anywhere. So it was perfect for Pink Floyd's music.

Serenegoose
07-06-2011, 08:46 PM
the last films I watched...

The secret of Kells (absolutely beautiful,definitely recommended for visuals alone)
Primer (I don't know if I can recommend what I didn't understand in the slightest because I don't know if it's bad or not. It was definitely interesting up until I stopped being able to follow what was going on.)

Rii
07-06-2011, 09:04 PM
I watched the x-men film (Michael Fassbender for the new James bond please)

Is Daniel Craig planning on moving on?


Primer (I don't know if I can recommend what I didn't understand in the slightest because I don't know if it's bad or not. It was definitely interesting up until I stopped being able to follow what was going on.)

LOL, that was my reaction precisely.

8-bit
07-06-2011, 09:36 PM
Is Daniel Craig planning on moving on?

no, I think he is doing the next one but who knows after that, me and the people I saw it with agreed that this guy would be really good for the part though.

tomeoftom
07-06-2011, 09:52 PM
Just saw The Sunset Limited. Fantastically written and acted, but didn't like the cinematography, which felt a bit obvious and heavy-handed.

Rii
07-06-2011, 10:06 PM
no, I think he is doing the next one but who knows after that, me and the people I saw it with agreed that this guy would be really good for the part though.

Hmm I don't think I've seen Fassbender in anything yet, although I've been meaning to get around to Jane Eyre at some point. Saves reading the book!

Re: Craig and Bond. I like the darker turn the franchise has taken of late and Craig is perfect for that, but I wouldn't want to see it continue in its current vein forever. One more grimdark film with Craig and then a tonal shift with a new Bond would suit me fine.

8-bit
19-06-2011, 09:40 PM
monsters, its sooooo good.

everything about the advertising I have seen is incredibly misleading though because
a)its not an action flick
b)its not a 'monster' movie

there is this scene at the end which is amazing, beautiful. I'll shut up now but go watch, its really good.

Kablooie
19-06-2011, 10:14 PM
I want to see Your Highness. I know it's probably gonna be horrible, but I laughed hard at trailers


I watched the x-men film (Michael Fassbender for the new James bond please), its as good as the first two but there are a few things that bothered me.

3/ besides prof x, Magneto, Raven and Sebastian Shaw the other mutants are basically just there as furniture.

As far as their lines go, I suppose, but I got a shivver (and that's not happened in a long time at a movie) when Banshee went into action. He's always been my favorite and I'm glad to see him finally included.

Lilliput King
19-06-2011, 10:25 PM
Maybe this should be in the controversy thread, but I was completely unmoved by Monsters.

It goes a little further than that, though - I don't see why I was supposed to be moved. Is it because the monsters (spoilers) perform the nightmare tentacle equivalent of the horizontal boogaloo? I mean, so what? Why is that supposed to be so powerful?

8-bit
19-06-2011, 10:49 PM
I don't know really, possibly something about the way it was done in a very non-hollywood way, and also because of what happens just before and just after.

or it could be because I just thought it was pwetty :D

JohnnyK
19-06-2011, 11:31 PM
I want to see Your Highness. I know it's probably gonna be horrible
It is. Very disappointing.

The JG Man
20-06-2011, 12:15 AM
Over the last two evenings, I've watched Dirty Harry and Magnum Force. They're both good films and you can definitely tell where a lot of modern, or at least since the 80s procedural crime shows/films have taken an awful lot of their inspiration from. Everything that you see is important, in some way, which is certainly refreshing, but having seen all that has come after, it's somewhat lessened the impact I think it would have had if I'd have seen them when they first came out. They also felt too long, but I think that may just be me not being able to sit through too much now. Dirty Harry is definitely recommended watching though. Some great lines, sequences, etc.

Donjo
20-06-2011, 02:20 AM
I just watched

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CF1rtd8_pxA

Pretty good, kind of crawls along.. I suppose that's kind of the point though..

And yesterday I watched


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0BvP99-Ci6k

Absolutely terrible, couldn't be bothered watching the end... I just didn't care about what would happen to any of the characters.

sinomatic
20-06-2011, 04:29 AM
Absolutely terrible, couldn't be bothered watching the end... I just didn't care about what would happen to any of the characters.

BLASPHEMY!

Seriously though, I think the film has much more resonance to someone who has watched the series. Unless you already have, in which case I'm going to shout blasphemy in your face some more :D

I watched Oliver Stone's Heaven and Earth the other day. Between that and watching the C4 programme on Sri Lanka's killing fields last week my faith in humanity has been at something of a low. Recommendations for something spirit-lifting would be appreciated.

Jams O'Donnell
20-06-2011, 09:56 AM
Last night I watched The Troll Hunter, and it was exceedingly satisfying, and really quite funny in places. Totally recommended.

<iframe width="560" height="349" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/TLEo7H9tqSM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

Xercies
20-06-2011, 10:02 AM
Seriously though, I think the film has much more resonance to someone who has watched the series. Unless you already have, in which case I'm going to shout blasphemy in your face some more

Hmm thats funny because I actually didn't like the series that much(still don't get the fans reaction to Joss Wheaden I don't think i've really liked any of his TV series) but I quite enjoyed the movie a lot.

Donjo
20-06-2011, 01:51 PM
BLASPHEMY!

Seriously though, I think the film has much more resonance to someone who has watched the series. Unless you already have, in which case I'm going to shout blasphemy in your face some more :D

I watched Oliver Stone's Heaven and Earth the other day. Between that and watching the C4 programme on Sri Lanka's killing fields last week my faith in humanity has been at something of a low. Recommendations for something spirit-lifting would be appreciated.

:) Blasphemer to the end! Yeah, I didn't watch the series, I might give it a go because I like the premise, the film just seemed.. kind of silly.



Last night I watched The Troll Hunter, and it was exceedingly satisfying, and really quite funny in places. Totally recommended.

<iframe width="560" height="349" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/TLEo7H9tqSM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

Troll Hunter! Yeah, it's really good! Great pacing, actually pretty good effects and, yeah, quite funny too :)

EndelNurk
20-06-2011, 01:57 PM
I think Serenity's most important point is that it demonstrates how nasty the Alliance are in that universe. Throughout the series, the crew of Firefly tend to be acting illegally by Alliance laws if not actually in direct action against the Alliance. Serenity goes some way to justifying that. It also finishes off the strange River Tam story which didn't really have enough time to get very far in one season of TV shows. I don't think I enjoyed Serenity first time round, then I watched Firefly and had a much better time when I came back to it.

I recently saw Charlie Wilson's War which randomly popped up from LoveFilm. I found it a very interesting film and provides some interesting context to recent events.

TheLastBaron
20-06-2011, 06:21 PM
Just watched Sumbmarine, it was quite good and had a good soundtrack.

Donjo
20-06-2011, 06:33 PM
I think Serenity's most important point is that it demonstrates how nasty the Alliance are in that universe. Throughout the series, the crew of Firefly tend to be acting illegally by Alliance laws if not actually in direct action against the Alliance. Serenity goes some way to justifying that. It also finishes off the strange River Tam story which didn't really have enough time to get very far in one season of TV shows. I don't think I enjoyed Serenity first time round, then I watched Firefly and had a much better time when I came back to it.

I recently saw Charlie Wilson's War which randomly popped up from LoveFilm. I found it a very interesting film and provides some interesting context to recent events.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qgx5WkwSJzU

Seems interesting alright, I'll have a look for it... Tom Hanks though. I really hate Tom Hanks.

Joseph-Sulphur
20-06-2011, 06:48 PM
Just watched Children of Men. Amazing film, one of the few which has managed to use "shakycam" well. Its also one of the most atmospheric and well realised dystopic scenarios I've ever come across in a film.

Xercies
21-06-2011, 06:56 PM
Just watched Source Code, Duncan Jones is definitely on my To watch whatever he makes despite not knowing what the hell its about just because he's a really good Director List along with Guillmo Del Toro and David Fincher. This was a really good movie i have to say, nice little sci-fi in it, it definitely grabs your attention and never lets go it has a lot of philosophical and touching moments and to be honest I didn't mind the kind of schmultzy ending because i thought it deserved it. Also it was a films based around smarts and a very old conceit of a bomb being on a train and trying to stop another one with a modern twist. The ending could have a dark edge to it, if you think about it it does but to be honest the happy ending is about right as well. So yeah definitly recommend it, and can't wait till whatever this Director does next.

Edawan
22-06-2011, 12:04 PM
I recently bought the first three Pirates of the Caribbeans movies on Blu-Ray.
The films are still very entertaining, but what pleasantly surprised me is the quality of the bonus materials. It's not just some promotional featurettes slapped on the disc like we see with too many films, but hours of backstage sequences that show to ups and downs of the production. It's not quite as exhaustive as the LotR bonuses but it's the closest I've seen in a long time.

JohnnyK
22-06-2011, 12:26 PM
Just watched Children of Men. Amazing film
Totally agree with that, this is a must-see.

I watched Tracker (with Ray Winstone) last night. Not a great movie, but well-acted and quite interesting. The absolutely gorgeous shots of New Zealand are simpy breathtaking.

Kablooie
22-06-2011, 12:31 PM
Just finished watching 9 again the other night. I have it on blu-ray and it's beautiful, I love good animation. The environment was really well done, a devastated world, the graveyard of Man. I think my two animated favorites are this film and The Incredibles.

There is also an old french film, Fantastic Planet, 1972 (the french title was La Planete Sauvage), that I'd like to obtain a copy of.

97

EDIT: Me and a friend just finished watching the dvd of Battle for Los Angeles. I really don't understand why the critics panned it so bad, it was a great movie. Visceral and exciting, well paced, good character acting and arc, gritty. The special effects were -very- realistic, unlike what many critics said. They don't know what they're talking about, I highly recommend this movie.

Rock N Rowe
25-06-2011, 01:07 AM
Recently I have watched 'The Transcendent Man', 'Gods of Men' and 'The Illusionist'. I recommend all three of them.

I found 'The Transcendent Man' very interesting and entertaining, yet scary. If you're a fan of SciFi and technology, it's a must. 'Gods of Men' was a bleak movie, but it was shot well, the acting was great and the story was riveting (It's also a true story). I was totally surprised by the Illusionist though. I thought I'd watch it after 'Gods of Men' to cheer me up, but as brilliant as it was, it was pretty damn depressing. The animation in that movie was superb.

Next on my list is 'Hobo with a Shotgun'.

Serenegoose
25-06-2011, 01:52 AM
The Terminator was just on, so that's what I've just watched. It's brilliant as ever, even with the dodgy special effects. I'm also just about to order Tangled from Amazon.

Cable
25-06-2011, 04:46 AM
I didn't like children of men at all, please tell me what I'm doing wrong.

Spacewalk
25-06-2011, 04:58 AM
Robot Jox. It's only worth a rental as the only parts you won't be fast forwarding through are the stop motion robot fight scenes and even those aren't as hot as the trailer would have you believe. Mostly they just stand still whilst they shoot at each other and then it's a round of boxing. Maybe if the wafer-thin romantic sub-plot was cut out and it focused entirely on the rivalry between the two leads and the other sub-plot about match fixing it would have been better. I'd still like to see the two unofficial sequels Crash and Burn and Robot Wars though.

Xercies
25-06-2011, 10:25 AM
Zodiac was on Last night so i watched that again, I still think this is a really good and interesting movie. It is a bit long but to be honest to get everything in that it had to it had to be really. Its very interesting and it does keep you on the edge of your seat, there are definitely some disturbing bits in it. All in all I really recommend this film.

Rock N Rowe
25-06-2011, 11:01 AM
Zodiac was on Last night so i watched that again, I still think this is a really good and interesting movie. It is a bit long but to be honest to get everything in that it had to it had to be really. Its very interesting and it does keep you on the edge of your seat, there are definitely some disturbing bits in it. All in all I really recommend this film.

I've had this film for approximately 2 years and I still haven't watched it. I'll have to check it out this weekend.

westyfield
25-06-2011, 11:49 PM
I just watched The Ghost (The Ghost Writer if you're in America), it was really good. It's a thriller based on the Robert Harris book from a few years ago, directed by Roman Polanski. Ewan McGregor gets hired to be Not Tony Blair's ghostwriter while a war crimes investigation is taking place. A moodily-shot and set, tense, really well acted film. I recommend it.

Rii
26-06-2011, 04:28 PM
I think Serenity's most important point is that it demonstrates how nasty the Alliance are in that universe. Throughout the series, the crew of Firefly tend to be acting illegally by Alliance laws if not actually in direct action against the Alliance. Serenity goes some way to justifying that.

I don't think the Alliance is particularly nasty, no more than (for example) the government of the United States. Firefly is deeply rooted in American libertarian ideology. The state is impotent to stop the evils of its world, its bureaucracy is but a hindrance to the average citizen and its attempts to fashion a better society cause more harm than good.

EndelNurk
26-06-2011, 05:40 PM
Spoilery stuff: The Alliance authorises a project to make the entire population calm and obedient by use of drugs. The Alliance then covers up the horrible results of that project and leave the Reavers produced from it to rape the people of the outlying planets to death. The Alliance also authorises agents to kill everyone involved in, or even aware of, events such as the above. Those events are horrifying enough that even one of those agents becomes disillusioned with them. To be fair, many such things have been claimed about the United States government, but importantly they haven't actually done them. As I say, these events are all in Serenity, the Alliance in Firefly is pretty much as you describe.

Rii
26-06-2011, 11:49 PM
Spoilery stuff: The Alliance authorises a project to make the entire population calm and obedient by use of drugs.

The Alliance wanted to make the world a better place, to do away with violence as a part of human nature. That's why the Operative is loyal to them: his terrible deeds will help to bring about a world in which there will be no more terrible deeds. The ends justify the means.

This is all classic fear of socialism and the state stuff. And underlying it all is the dichotomy between the view of human nature as fixed and immutable - the Christian view of man as inherently sinful - as espoused by Mal on more than one occasion, and the humanist, progressivist view of man - in short, the view held by meddlers of all kinds - as if not perfectible, then improvable.


The Alliance then covers up the horrible results of that project and leave the Reavers produced from it to rape the people of the outlying planets to death. The Alliance also authorises agents to kill everyone involved in, or even aware of, events such as the above. Those events are horrifying enough that even one of those agents becomes disillusioned with them. To be fair, many such things have been claimed about the United States government, but importantly they haven't actually done them.

The Alliance and the Reavers sounds pretty much like the history of the United States in kindling the flames of Islamic fundamentalism which it is now trying to stamp out, except that the Alliance had rather nobler intent than merely opposing communism and the nationalisation of the oil fields in the region. And of course the history of the US government experimenting on its own citizens and those of other nations is well documented (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unethical_human_experimentation_in_the_United_Stat es).

In any case one could've as easily used the United Kingdom as an example, except that Firefly is an American show deeply stepped in American values and symbols. The old west as the last frontier of the rugged individualist and so on. So: US it is.

EndelNurk
27-06-2011, 12:17 AM
The ends justify the means.

And that's not horrifying? As I said, by the end of the film even that Operative has become disillusioned with the methods of his own government. If even as fervent a believer as he could have lost faith then what does that suggest about the horrors of the project?

The Western genre is steeped in the ideas of rebellion against the state. I have never enjoyed the genre, in part for that reason. Firefly and Serenity is the first time I have ever enjoyed a Western and the reason is because the Alliance are horrifying and the Firefly crew are not. A pair of them are hiding from abuses by the Alliance, the rest are there for travel, survival, or getting rich but even then they do not take from those that have more need than they do. As Mal says: "May have been the losing side. Still not convinced it was the wrong one."

And with regard to the link you posted: Most of those studies are not by the US Government, instead it's a list of horrors that happened on US soil. Those that were by the government (e.g. Tuskegee) were apologised for, and more importantly caused enquiries, guidelines, laws and ethical bodies to be created that prevent those in the future. In Serenity, the Alliance makes no such attempt to fix the problems that they have caused.

Rii
27-06-2011, 12:42 AM
And that's not horrifying?

I didn't say it wasn't. But it's certainly not at all far removed from "let's bomb and torture our way to freedom".


As I said, by the end of the film even that Operative has become disillusioned with the methods of his own government.

The Operative naturally had a particular view of the universe his service was aiding to create and what he discovered (rather, was forced to see) didn't match up with that. An interesting question is what the Operative would've thought had the experiment been successful.


Those that were by the government (e.g. Tuskegee) were apologised for, and more importantly caused enquiries, guidelines, laws and ethical bodies to be created that prevent those in the future.

And what do you think will happen now in the post-Serenity world? The people aren't going to stage a Death Star trench run against an Emperor cackling on his throne, the vast majority of what constitutes 'the Alliance' didn't know about this.


In Serenity, the Alliance makes no such attempt to fix the problems that they have caused.

We've no indication that the Alliance simply leaves the Reavers to run amok. On the other hand, we've plenty of indications throughout the series and film that the Alliance simply isn't strong enough to maintain effective presence outside the core worlds. After all, that's how Mal is able to operate in the first place.

EndelNurk
27-06-2011, 01:27 AM
I didn't say it wasn't. But it's certainly not at all far removed from "let's bomb and torture our way to freedom".

In the Unification War the Alliance bombed Mal's home planet with such ferocity that it is entirely uninhabitable. They've committed atrocities of many kinds.


We've no indication that the Alliance simply leaves the Reavers to run amok. On the other hand, we've plenty of indications throughout the series and film that the Alliance simply isn't strong enough to maintain effective presence outside the core worlds. After all, that's how Mal is able to operate in the first place.

In Serenity, a fleet is despatched for the sole purpose of catching one ship. That fleet, even when caught off guard, is enough to destroy the majority of Reavers in the system. I would therefore suggest that if the Alliance had wanted to, or if they felt the cause of saving lives was important enough, they could have sent a fleet to stop the Reavers before they became a threat and that's even without considering the ethics of the experiment itself.

It is possible, given what happens in Serenity, that River was being trained to wipe out the Reavers (presumably not on her own), however I'm not sure that kidnapping and abusing a young girl is a worthwhile price for that end when a fleet of trained volunteer personnel was available.

Regardless, none of this excuses human experimentation on a planet-wide scale (there were 30 million people on Miranda. Even the very worst abuses of medical and psychological experimentation in history have not spread that far) and, of course, this is a universe that has already had the opportunity to learn from the mistakes that were made in the real world. I do not think that the Alliance's actions here can be at all justified.

Poindexter
27-06-2011, 08:57 PM
The Western genre is steeped in the ideas of rebellion against the state. I have never enjoyed the genre, in part for that reason. Firefly and Serenity is the first time I have ever enjoyed a Western and the reason is because the Alliance are horrifying and the Firefly crew are not. A pair of them are hiding from abuses by the Alliance, the rest are there for travel, survival, or getting rich but even then they do not take from those that have more need than they do. As Mal says: "May have been the losing side. Still not convinced it was the wrong one."

I think you may be reading Mal's statement wrong. It's not really a defense of being a generally nice guy (as Mal points out several times in the series, he's not a nice guy). Since Firefly (and Serenity) are heavily based on the American Old West (and Western genre), you need to look at it in light of that. A lot of American frontier people felt very similarly to Mal after the American Civil War. For example, compare Mal to the outlaw Jesse James (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jesse_James). Jesse James fought as a Confederate guerrilla who committed hit and run attacks against Union soldiers. After the war, he became one of the most famous robbers and murderers of the American West. The statement "May have been the losing side. Still not convinced it was the wrong one." might as well have been said by James himself.

See also American Old West. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Old_West)

TillEulenspiegel
27-06-2011, 10:07 PM
It's not really a defense of being a generally nice guy (as Mal points out several times in the series, he's not a nice guy).
Funny thing is, Mal repeatedly claims this, but his actions tell a different story. Jayne is the man that Mal claims to be (neutral and self-interested), but Mal is firmly Chaotic Good. Maybe not "nice", but certainly Good. A very slightly grittier version of Han Solo.

Poindexter
27-06-2011, 10:20 PM
Funny thing is, Mal repeatedly claims this, but his actions tell a different story. Jayne is the man that Mal claims to be (neutral and self-interested), but Mal is firmly Chaotic Good. Maybe not "nice", but certainly Good. A very slightly grittier version of Han Solo.

While I agree that Mal's actions don't match with his description of himself, my point is that his quote about being on the losing side, has nothing to do with his morality; It's simply a description of how he feels about the war/government, that fits with the theme of Firefly being a futuristic Old West.

EndelNurk
27-06-2011, 11:03 PM
You're absolutely right in that the viewpoint is one that's raised in most Western stories. My entire point, however, was that I don't like more Westerns because I dislike the character's motivation in struggling against the side that I see as the rightful winner in that conflict. In Firefly, it is the Browncoats who I see as having just cause in that war and so I feel more comfortable empathising with those characters. As I say, this is the only western that I can ever remember having enjoyed. I acknowledge that that's a minority opinion as many people love those stories, but I hope I've managed to give some explanation as to why I feel that way.

@TillEugenspiel I quite like Nathan Fillion's reading of the crew (which I only read yesterday due to the discussions raised in this thread) that Mal keeps the crew close to him as they each represent an aspect of his persona that he's lost during his struggle. Jayne's selfishness, for example, reflects Mal's own selfishness that he had to lose during the Unification War.

EndelNurk
30-06-2011, 12:30 PM
This isn't out yet but should be worth keeping an eye out for: http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/video/2011/jun/30/tinker-tailor-soldier-spy-traiker

Xercies
30-06-2011, 06:23 PM
I'm surprised about all the british actors and they are all speaking english since I thought the director was Swedish.

Poindexter
01-07-2011, 10:57 PM
I just today watched There Will Be Blood, the one starring Daniel Day-Lewis as an Oil Prospector around the turn of the century. It's an excellent film and Day-Lewis absolutely deserved all the awards he won for it.

Xercies
01-07-2011, 11:42 PM
Just watched Fargo, excellent excellent film, is there a film from the coen brothers i won't like? Probably not. Was really surprised about the dark humour running through this flick, but more surprised about how kind of brutal it is. There is quite a few deaths in it. Of course the characters in it are brilliant, and all have that weird oddness and not exactly right emotions to the situation they are in that the coen brothers are quite famous for. Thought the main character by the end was a little stupid, if he thought about it a bit mroe he could have turned it around in his favor. Also Aww at the cop couple.

Spacewalk
02-07-2011, 12:53 AM
Watched Deathsport yesterday. Plastic sword fights, tits, Richard Lynch, gratuitous use of motorcycles and David Carradine in a role that Christopher Lambert was born to play. It's an enjoyable watch if you like the kinds of films that Roger Corman is involved with.

Rii
02-07-2011, 08:59 PM
Let Me In
I'm forced to agree with the majority: this American adaptation of the Swedish novel is just as good as the superlative Swedish adaptation Let The Right One In. I went back to watch the latter film right after Let Me In, in fact, and having done so I honestly can't say which version I prefer. They each have their strengths. Let Me In shifts the ages of all involved slightly, allowing the bullies to be more menacing and thereby making their bloody fates more palatable. the Swedish film has the more suitably austere and foreboding atmosphere and, predictably, exhibits restraint where the American film prefers to relish in detail. The relationship between 'father' and vampire in the American film is slightly more complicated and in that respect effective. Regardless of the version one sees, this is definitely one of the high-water marks of the vampire genre.

Later this year we'll see whether Fincher's The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo can pull off the same trick. Noomi Rapace's portrayal of Lisbeth in the Swedish version is going to be hard to top.

Sucker Punch
This is not a great film. I'm not sure it's even a good film. But one thing is certain: there's a hell of a lot more here than most critics and audiences are willing to grant. The target of the titular sucker punch is its - and Snyder's - core audience: male geeks. They came expecting hot, skimpily clad chicks prancing around in videogame cutscenes and instead they got beaten over the head with a story about the objectification and exploitation of women, about disassociation and agency and all that other stuff that the folks going to see this film absolutely do not want to think about. And it's a story that pulls no punches. If you'd asked me at the halfway mark how the rest of the film was going to unfold, I would've been off by a mile, and so, I suspect, would most.

The film's resemblance to a video game - and a spectacular one at that - is, I suspect, no accident. Indeed, for the right writer at the nexus of gaming, feminism and film studies I suspect there's a Master's thesis waiting to be written here. And yet for all that, as a film it has significant issues at virtually every level, from script to acting to editing. Oh I don't know what to think about this one, but I shall be buying it on Blu-Ray, if only for the steam-powered Nazi zombies.

Snyder has yet to make a film that I can give two unqualified thumbs-up to, but nor has he made a film that I believe is without merit, and for making this, a film which he must've known was going to take fire from all directions, he has certainly earned my respect. I'll be following whatever he does next with interest.


I'm surprised about all the british actors and they are all speaking english since I thought the director was Swedish.

It's not particularly unusual. English allows one to reach the broadest audience. Cultural imperialism in action.

Certified Copy has an Iranian directing a film in English, Italian and French. xD

EndelNurk
02-07-2011, 09:14 PM
Tinker, Tailor is also one of the most British stories imaginable. The lack of influence of Britain after the war, especially compared to the US, is a vital part of the George Smiley stories. Not sure I could imagine it in a different language. I certainly couldn't imagine it even in US accents.

Rii
02-07-2011, 09:38 PM
I'm not familiar with the story, but it occurs to me that the same thing - of Britain suddenly finding itself a second-rate power between two goliaths - underpins the 007 mythos.

EndelNurk
02-07-2011, 11:30 PM
Perhaps, I don't know the books at all and am even pretty ignorant of most of the films. 007 and Smiley are hugely different, which changes the tone of the stories entirely, at least compared to the film version of Bond. I understand that the books paint him as being a little more cerebral. Smiley is a tired, old, beaten and betrayed man. He is also the most clever man around, and one of the most honest which is why he is put into the situations that Le Carre writes about. The story is also part of a larger struggle with a particular individual in Moscow who Smiley regards as a personal adversary. The (a)morality and symmetry in the stories are beautiful. I obviously have no idea how much of that will end up in the film but I think it would be tremendously difficult to make it into a stinker.

Lilliput King
03-07-2011, 12:30 AM
"the Swedish film has the more suitably austere and foreboding atmosphere and, predictably, exhibits restraint where the American film prefers to relish in detail"

Pretty much what I took away from the films, yeah. I think I preferred Let the Right One In for this reason, but also because its staging of the scene in the swimming pool was just something else entirely.

Jams O'Donnell
08-07-2011, 02:08 PM
I've mentioned previously that I'm digging through classic noir in the hope of discovering some lass well-known gems, and one that might be of interest to RPS types is Dark Passage, with Humphrey Bogart. The first third of it is filmed from a first-person perspective, and it's done a lot better than the dumb first-person section of the Doom movie.

Xercies
08-07-2011, 05:58 PM
Watched The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo, really good thriller I have to say, takes its time with it but it definitely grabs you. The sexual assault things are a bit tough to watch but its good its like that, basically it puts it in cold light. Shot pretty beutifully(by this point i think Swedish directors have a really good eye for shots) and satisfying enough as a standalone piece while also serving up a sequel. Haven't read the books so I can't say whether its faithful or not but don't particularly mind.

Rii
08-07-2011, 11:18 PM
Watched The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo, really good thriller I have to say, takes its time with it but it definitely grabs you. The sexual assault things are a bit tough to watch but its good its like that, basically it puts it in cold light. Shot pretty beutifully(by this point i think Swedish directors have a really good eye for shots) and satisfying enough as a standalone piece while also serving up a sequel. Haven't read the books so I can't say whether its faithful or not but don't particularly mind.

Unfortunately they changed directors for the sequels and it shows. They're still worth watching on account of Noomi Rapace's superlative performance, though.

I haven't read the books either - the first one has been sitting in my pile for months now. :o

On a related note, although the trailer for Fincher's version is promising, the poster leaves a sour taste in my mouth:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WVLvMg62RPA

http://img593.imageshack.us/img593/1707/dragontattoousposter.jpg

I know the latter is probably just marketing, but if it's an accurate reflection of Lisbeth's portrayal and the relationship between her and Blomkvist in the film, I shall rage.

EDIT: Ok, that's an interesting framegrab from Youtube there...

Xercies
09-07-2011, 12:14 AM
That trailer almost looks like a shot for shot remake of the film to be honest. Its David Fincher so I may have a look, I mean he is probably the one I would say wouldn't mess it up to much. The thing is though I really don't see the point of remaking these films. The same with Let The Right One In, I just never went to the English remake, because 1) The Swedish original made such and impact that its up there as one of my favourite films and 2) It just smacks of cultural who gives a fuck. Its endemic of a culture that is very scared of subtitles on films. Oh know I have to read while watching a film, get away!

One thing I have to say, the diologue is very fast in the beginning of TGWDT but I didn't have any problems reading it and looking a the pretty visuals, usually there is nothing "exciting" going on the screen when people talk anyway so I don't get that reason either.

Lilliput King
09-07-2011, 01:43 AM
That's quite the poster. Huh.

Oak
09-07-2011, 02:09 AM
I can see that lady's boobs.

Rii
09-07-2011, 04:39 AM
Its David Fincher so I may have a look, I mean he is probably the one I would say wouldn't mess it up to much.

Yep, if I had to pick an American director for the film Fincher (or Aronofsky) would probably be it. I mean, the guy who made Se7en is still in there somewhere, right? Likewise Daniel Craig as Blomkvist is great casting. It's Rooney Mara as Lisbeth I'm not sure about. I'm not sure she's 'hard' enough. And that poster doesn't help.


The thing is though I really don't see the point of remaking these films. The same with Let The Right One In, I just never went to the English remake, because 1) The Swedish original made such and impact that its up there as one of my favourite films and 2) It just smacks of cultural who gives a fuck. Its endemic of a culture that is very scared of subtitles on films. Oh know I have to read while watching a film, get away!

I'm generally cool to cold towards most remakes, but only because they so rarely capture the magic of the original work. I was a long time being convinced to give Let Me In a chance precisely on account of the sentiments you mention. It's particularly bothersome when setting, plot and character details are changed to suit the local audience, which to me reads as denying the original work and the culture which birthed it.

In the case of Let Me In there wasn't much to tie the film to anywhere in particular (so long as there's appropriate scenery) so the change to America is unproblematic. In contrast there's an awful lot tying The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo to Sweden and to its credit the American version is maintaining the setting. One other thing I'd note is that in both of the cases we're talking about here the original work is actually a novel and technically the American films are independent adaptations of those rather than remakes of the earlier Swedish film adaptations.

Ultimately, despite other sympathies I have it's the quality of the work that wins out for me in the end. It just so happens that it's usually the original which is better. ;)

Xercies
09-07-2011, 01:26 PM
One other thing I'd note is that in both of the cases we're talking about here the original work is actually a novel and technically the American films are independent adaptations of those rather than remakes of the earlier Swedish film adaptations.

You see I don't really believe that, if they wanted to make their own adaptation why did they mysteriously wait for the swedish one to be made, and to be honest they only do it if that swedish film seems popular. Which is doubly silly since you would have thought most people who have seen it would have, unless of course your one of those subtitle haters. Also before America remade REC and and they want to remake Troll Hunter I think. So yeah I really don't believe that's true.


Ultimately, despite other sympathies I have it's the quality of the work that wins out for me in the end. It just so happens that it's usually the original which is better.

I kind of agree, but as I said before I really don't like people just dismissing films because it has subtitles and filmakers remaking films for really no apprant reason except for targeting those people. I mean you could say thats great, more people seeing the story because they wouldn't otherwise, but you know it isn't really. Its just people not opening there minds I feel.

Rii
09-07-2011, 03:14 PM
I kind of agree, but as I said before I really don't like people just dismissing films because it has subtitles and filmakers remaking films for really no apprant reason except for targeting those people.

I think it's particularly noticeable in these instances because the Swedish films are so recent, and were so well received themselves. But of course that goes back to them being adaptations of recent novels.


I mean you could say thats great, more people seeing the story because they wouldn't otherwise, but you know it isn't really. Its just people not opening there minds I feel.

But couldn't you say that about making film adaptations of novels in the first place? If they wanted to experience the story, why didn't they read the book? Even for those of us who do read for pleasure, film has lower barriers to entry that can lead to our experiencing stories we otherwise might not have. Kazuo Ishiguru's Never Let Me Go is another recent example.

I do think accessibility is important. Games are probably subject to this problem more than any other medium. Games from even a decade back are often difficult for newcomers to approach, most notably in terms of visual presentation but also design sensibilities and even getting the damn thing to run at all. In film, beyond the myriad of more subtle evolutions you've got the major transitions from black and white to colour, and the 'silent film' era. In literature if you go back far enough you'll have your work cut out trying to understanding what you're reading at all.

Of course none of that really applies in the case of the films we're talking about here - the subtitles are the only difference. But as much as we might wish it were otherwise, most folks don't read for pleasure and aren't accustomed to doing so for film. The Swedish films will always be there and if anything the American versions will probably lead more people to discover them.

Whilst we're on the subject of Swedish film, I'm a big fan of Lukas Moodysson's work. Fucking ml, Tillsammans and Lilja 4-ever are all excellent films.

Xercies
09-07-2011, 05:08 PM
Hmm i guess so, and i do kind of understand what your saying. But I have to say those people who don't like watching subtitle films are basically missing a lot of films, some of them are truly great. A few of my top 20 are foreign language films.

Rii
09-07-2011, 05:28 PM
But I have to say those people who don't like watching subtitle films are basically missing a lot of films, some of them are truly great. A few of my top 20 are foreign language films.

Yeah, definitely. And it's not all arthouse stuff either, for jet porn enthusiasts Le Chevaliers Du Ciel and Yukikaze are the best flicks to come out since Top Gun. But oh well, what can you do?

acroman56
12-07-2011, 07:52 PM
The last film I watched was.....Transformers 3: Dark of the Moon. Please don't go and see it, if you have any love for films or Transformers at all just don't do it. You would have thought Transformers 2 would have taught me not to continue watching these films but I convinced myself that it had to be better than the second one and while it is better than number 2 that's like saying that being shot in the face is better than being stabbed in the face.

My main problem was that the film focused waaaaaay too heavily on the human characters, it's called Transformers, we came to see robots punching each other so if we don't even get that what's the point? I should also mention the franchises horrible comedy cameos that are just so out of place the worst offender being that camp asian guy from The Hangover who turns the camp level up to 11 and has the codename 'Deep Wang'. Even typing that made me feel ill. The last half an hour or so of the film involving Chicago is pretty entertaining as far as robots punching each other and explosions go, but the ending is so anti-climactic with Optimus Prime simply offing the main villains in seconds as though they are no threat at all, all I can hope is that this means no more sequels.

Now to go watch the original 80's animated Transformers movie to wash the pain away!

Xercies
24-07-2011, 12:31 PM
Yesterday I seemed to have had a day of death with the films i watched. Two different approaches to death which is quite interesting to be honest.

Wristcutters: A Love Story - Definitely very Indie. Its so Indie. You can feel the Indieness coming from its bones. Basically the premise is, is that if you commit suicide you get transported to a place quite like our own but worse since its very washed out colours and people can't smile. What that is is kind of window dressing to a kind of surreal road trip movie, with a predictable romance. It does have some nice bits in it, the characters are fine, its got a light comic feel to it and its Ok. It thinks its weirder then it is, it has some weird bits, and the premise is weirdly great but the actual story kind of doesn't really do anything with it until kind of the last third where it goes through a lot of interesting ideas with no explanation or depth to any of them so its a little disappointing in that regard. The ending is a little to nice and happy for my liking and it doesn't really feel right to me.

Meet Joe Black - Definitely Hollywood. So Hollywood with its treatment of Death. This is another issue, people think its weirder then it actually is. Its a very standard Hollywood love interest and someone out of their place comedy except the character is Death. Now i quite like the rappour Brad Pitt and Anthony Hopkins had, I wish it had more of them just going together and more of a story of what do you leave behind when you die if you did have a chance to leave something behind. But instead it focused on Death being a fish out of water, and the love between him and the daughter, which is fine but to predictable that i thought Damn you've kind of wasted an interesting premise there. Its still sweet and likeable enough to enjoy, and it does have hints of that death, getting older and what do you leave behind to keep it mildly interesting.

icupnimpn2
24-07-2011, 07:55 PM
Saw Cappy Americano. There are some nice nods to comic continuity, and the film springboards from Thor more than I was expecting. The film was somehow less rousing than the trailer, in part because the film's bland soundtrack. I'm at a little bit of a loss to describe why it was any less entertaining than Iron Man, Iron Man 2, or Thor, but it comes out as the weakest of the four. Add in Incredible Hulk (the last of the Avengers tie-ins), which I liked, and it still falls short. Maybe part of the problem is that the film shows some of the best action in montage instead of as part of a tight narrative. This is meant to give you the feeling that the Cap has been operating successfully for a while, and you're supposed to fill in the gaps yourself. I'm not a big fan of the montage.

Anyway, still better than some films. And there were some good bits. I liked his early career but disliked his cliche change in status, and scenes that should have been emotionally wrenching fell flat.

Staying optimistic for Avengers, which is previewed after the credits.

Rii
25-07-2011, 05:45 AM
I'm not a big fan of the montage.

But ... everyone loves a montage! (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CQvNu8LoTo0)


Monsters
Each of the elements of this film has been seen before, but their combination is unique and compelling. The execution is remarkably proficient given the film's nonexistent budget, but the script and pacing could've been better. In one key and otherwise excellent scene the film oversells its themes through dialogue, almost as if it doesn't trust the audience to fill in the least blank themselves. In another, the characters interrupt the haunting silence to ask a question that both they and the audience already know the answer to. The film is also unfortunately lopsided in another respect: the first half bustles with people whereas the second is almost entirely devoid of them, leaving our two protagonists to face the wild alone. Both aspects are used to good effect, but by the end we've forgotten much of what made the journey so appealing in the first place. See Into the Wild on how to do this better. This is a worthy enough film, it's just unfortunate that it isn't better.

Hanna
For the most part this plays out as a third-rate Bourne flick with an intriguing twist that nevertheless fails to elevate the experience beyond 'watchable'. Some random observations: watching Eric Bana pretend to be German is darkly humourous. Cate Blanchett's 'Marissa' is just this side of Darth Vader. And of course she doesn't have children, how else would we know that she's evil? Hanna's (female) friend is almost as unconvincing a depiction of a 14yr-old girl as Hanna herself, without her excuse of having been raised by wolves.

The JG Man
25-07-2011, 06:16 PM
Went to see Super with a friend. I haven't seen Kick-Ass, although I have it floating around to watch. Anyhow, won't make any comparisons there.

The plot is fine, the characters are generally pretty good, although Ellen Paige gets the award for best acting in this film, clearly giving it her all. Probably helped by the fact she has the best character, unless you count Nathan Fillion who plays a fictional Christian TV super-hero (it's better than it sounds). So when I say, "it's not that the film is bad", I don't want you to necessarily think it's a bad film, but I don't know if I like it. It's easy to watch, but there's a real dissonance between what's going on and what you're being shown at times. For example, after a pretty sobering second of footage, a roaring rampage of violence ensues and as you're rapt for it, comic-book styled images appear on screen. It just doesn't work.

In fact, that's what I think about the film. It doesn't work. It's neither good or bad, it simply doesn't fit together. It's two pieces of a jig-saw being forced together. The term visceral hasn't served me as usefully since I saw Planet Terror, but unlike Planet Terror and Scott Pilgrim Vs. The World, the style is consistent. Planet Terror is hyper-violent, but it doesn't make you retreat. SP, to borrow from TV Tropes, takes refuge in audacity with frequent inclusions or cuts to comic styled images or happenings. Super feels like they were doing it at one point, forgot about it for ages and were like, "Oh, crap, we need to add this in somewhere!" This also, bizarrely, happens with a character who is killed and then not talked about again. It's a small role, but the character is important, so why nothing was brought up of this again is a little beyond me.

The fact it's dark, pretty gruesome and vulgar at times doesn't really bother me, but the tone isn't prepared for the moments where these are really done. It's mostly a case of "Whoa, did they just do that?" with the violence. The film also single-handedly justifies the existence of the trope "Rape is OK When It Is Female on Male" (http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/RapeIsOkWhenItIsFemaleOnMale).

At times it was very enjoyable, at others, I was kinda surprised at the content. After the film finished and I was talking to my friend about it, I said that "Sometimes the gloss of mainstream isn't so bad." Mainstream plays things safe, so you don't always get to see as much darkness, but I'd have preferred a little safety in Super at some moments.

With a limited release and no noticeable marketing, it was never going to be big, but I can't say that's a problem for this film. It'll enjoy the cult support it inevitably builds up, along with those who are interested in seeing Page in spandex, but the indifference the film leaves me with that will tide my mind for a bit of time to come will eventually guarantee that I won't remember even seeing it down the line.

Xercies
25-07-2011, 10:49 PM
Actually i wish it had a bit more of a sadder darker tone then the whiplash you get of the light dark comedy and the horrible sad i don't even think this is supposed to be funny dark comedy. It showed really good flashes of that and it would have definitly made it a bit different from Kick Ass.

The JG Man
25-07-2011, 11:54 PM
I just wish it'd have picked one. The in-your-face violence didn't really work with the to-ing and fro-ing, so either remove that and be a little more upbeat, or keep it and stay grim.

8-bit
29-07-2011, 11:01 PM
the happening: woooooooo evil trees! D:

my little brother is/was a film student, and has just finished directing a very short film about a girl running away from a killer or something. its fairly terrible and he knows it, but its something he did and he is understandably very proud of it. my brothers three minute film is better than the happening.

Plankton
30-07-2011, 08:40 AM
the happening: woooooooo evil trees! D:
The Happening is hilarious. I went in having heard that it was bad, I wasn't quite ready for what I saw. But I had a ton of fun watching it^^. Plus, it has Zooey Deschanel <3

Rii
30-07-2011, 09:35 AM
I don't remember much about The Happening, but I do remember thinking it wasn't nearly as bad as most folks said. The potential was there, but then it always is with Shyamalan. But then I liked The Village, so YMMV.

I finally got to seeing The Seventh Seal last night and ... argh, talk about unapproachable. There were scenes that had me transfixed, but as a film entire? I don't know. This was my first Bergman film (yeah, yeah...) and I'm not about to give up just yet, but I'd be lying if I said it was a promising start.

Xercies
30-07-2011, 09:57 AM
The Happenning is quite funny to be honest, Mark Whalburg is playing his character in a really werid manner. Actually there are loads of weird characters in that film, Hot Dog Guy is the most memorable. The acting is terrible sometimes, as someone got shot Mark Whalburg is just going "Oh No". Also what is he trying to do with the non creepy but absolutly hilarious trying to be creepy wind through trees. Also Mark Whalburg talks to a plastic tree.

I can see though that this really could have been an interesting film to be honest if it wasn't mishandled so badly, the shot where the suicides go from person to person is a little strange but it actually is I thought quite good and a little bit powerful to be honest.

Spacewalk
30-07-2011, 11:39 AM
The Good, The Bad and The Ugly is on TV right now so I've gotta take a break from the internet to watch that.

8-bit
30-07-2011, 03:38 PM
I don't remember much about The Happening, but I do remember thinking it wasn't nearly as bad as most folks said. The potential was there, but then it always is with Shyamalan. But then I liked The Village, so YMMV..

I liked the village too! I also liked his other earlier films, don't really understand why his latest stuff hasn't come out right.


Also Mark Whalburg talks to a plastic tree.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jhmEo-46vUQ

amazing. the best part of the film is just after the lawnmower scene, they walk past a sign saying "you deserve this". :D

Xercies
30-07-2011, 05:06 PM
Limitless - Quite good sci fi concept to be honest, about a guy who finds a drug that can basically turn him into a god. He can access everything inside his head whether he remembers it or forgets it and so Decides to use this to his own advantage. Bradley Cooper does smary charm really well so main lead is great, also it kind of does something interesting in that it doesn't show that he would be ebtter off of the drug(he would die) and he should learn the true power inside him. Nope none of that Hollywood crap, just straight up I have a power and I'm going to abuse it and there is nothing you can do about it. That is bloody refreshing.

Wooly Wugga Wugga
31-07-2011, 05:45 PM
I'm someone who really doesn't enjoy overly violent films and I try to avoid torture porn so why the hell did I let myself sit through Hobo With a Shotgun. It's three days later and I still feel a bit squicked out.

Rii
31-07-2011, 05:53 PM
Essential Killing

Its other qualities aside, this film's premise alone will sell or repel most folks: we follow an unnamed Taliban fighter who, having killed several American soldiers in Afghanistan, is captured, 'processed', and whisked away to (I think) Poland, where he manages to escape and must elude his pursuers. The Age described it as "the action movie of the year" to which I must say: what the fuck? There's certainly action in it, but I wouldn't call it an action film. The last reel in particular wanders from that track entirely and takes a seat with the arthouse crowd.

So... what of it? I don't know, but I have some thoughts. The film is called "Essential Killing", yet were all his kills actually essential? The lumberjack was problematic. The film seems to agree: his clothing - white until that point - runs red with blood. Yet he doesn't relish killing, indeed his physical deterioration seems to echo his spiritual anguish. But is that enough to save him? There's a white horse at the end. Or at least, that's what the film shows us. I don't think there actually was any horse. But this is a white and beautiful horse and our protagonist too is clean and freshly dressed. And then he coughs up blood, spoiling its white mane.

This is a film about perspective, the drive to survive and what that can mean for our humanity. It doesn't give us answers, but rather is content to provoke thoughts. It's not a great film, but one could do a lot worse.

On a final note, this film has some wonderful cinematography. There's a silent helicopter shot in particular which is breathtaking.

thegooseking
31-07-2011, 06:01 PM
I went to see Arrietty last night. I deliberately chose to see a subtitled showing, because I figured there would be a smaller crowd, but unfortunately I was right: seeing the audience barely number double digits was quite saddening.

Maybe people just decided not to go and see it because they'd already pirated it from the Japanese release a year ago, but I suspect it was the subtitles. That kind of makes sense. It wasn't just a subtitled film; it was essentially a subtitled kids' film, and you just don't take your kids to see a subtitled film.

Vague-rant
31-07-2011, 07:57 PM
Unbreakable;

Awesome. Would've liked it to be left a little ambiguous at the end, the "visions" seemed a little far. Still then I'd complain an ending of a delusional man endangering himself and his family repeatedly wasn't particularly fulfilling. I actually preferred Unbreakable to The Sixth Sense.

8-bit
02-08-2011, 09:39 PM
captien americaland person, man. it was quite good, of course I was expecting it to be awful. avengers trailer looked ok.

confessions. some heavy stuff in there, much darker than the other two films I have seen from the director, but brilliantly done as usual.

Ian
03-08-2011, 09:24 AM
I watched The Town last night. Another cracker from Affleck.

Rii
05-08-2011, 08:22 PM
The Exorcism of Emily Rose

There's a lot to like about this film. I'm not one to bemoan the supposed victimisation of Christians in contemporary society, but I admit it was refreshing to see a film portraying a Priest - and a Catholic one at that - in a sympathetic light.

Unfortunately there a few things holding it back:
- Although the courtroom material is well executed in exploring the various facets of its unique case, the rest of it is a little too by the numbers. The procedures, character beats and so on, it's all a little too familiar. Blame the genre's overexposure on television, it nonetheless detracts from the film's impact.
- The foreboding atmosphere so well established outside the courtroom unsurprisingly fails to carry over into it, sapping the film's 'gut impact'. It's a pity, as the demonic possession stuff was surprisingly disturbing.
- We didn't get to know Emily Rose well enough, particularly throughout the first half of the film. Her 'sacrifice' thus seems to come a little out of left field and lacks plausibility. It works for the plot and perhaps thematically, but it doesn't feel like a natural evolution of her character.
- The endings: ROTK syndrome, made worse by the fact that the verdict scene seemed so superfluous to the story told thus far. They tried to mix it up a little, but nonetheless one can't escape the feeling that the film is just going through the motions. There's a verdict because there has to be a verdict, the film not being adventurous enough to deviate from its format.

Ultimately this film comes in at the upper end of "retain, but not buy" on my evaluative spectrum. Although apparently there's an alternative cut available, I wonder what was changed...


I went to see Arrietty last night. I deliberately chose to see a subtitled showing, because I figured there would be a smaller crowd, but unfortunately I was right: seeing the audience barely number double digits was quite saddening.

Maybe people just decided not to go and see it because they'd already pirated it from the Japanese release a year ago, but I suspect it was the subtitles. That kind of makes sense. It wasn't just a subtitled film; it was essentially a subtitled kids' film, and you just don't take your kids to see a subtitled film.

Yeah, I think you were looking at a niche within a niche within a niche within a niche there. Lucky to get double digits. :P


Unbreakable;

Awesome. Would've liked it to be left a little ambiguous at the end, the "visions" seemed a little far. Still then I'd complain an ending of a delusional man endangering himself and his family repeatedly wasn't particularly fulfilling. I actually preferred Unbreakable to The Sixth Sense.

Unbreakable is awesome, probably my favourite Shyamalan film too, if only because The Sixth Sense was spoiled for me before I saw it. Unbreakable cops a lot of flack for its pacing - probably from those who went to see it based on the 'superhero' tag - but I loved every minute of it.

Ebert recently defined an 'art film' as one that relies for its effect upon the close observation of human behaviour. In that context, I think Shyamalan's thing - which always manages to shine through irrespective of the quality of the final product - is in marrying that sensibility to supernatural or otherwise unworldly circumstances.


I watched The Town last night. Another cracker from Affleck.

Wait, so Affleck has actually been in stuff worth watching since Good Will Hunting? Clearly I'm behind the times here.

Xercies
06-08-2011, 10:57 AM
I feel a bit sorry for Shyamalan, I have no idea what happened but he has definitly crashed after making 3 really quite good movies(I actually really liked Signs, its very very good on atmosphere and creepyness). The thing thats most tragic is that even at his worser movies you can still see that apark that made Shyamalan very good.

Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows Part 2


Finally got to see this, in 3D to. Didin't think the 3D added anything, and I think it subtracted it in a few instances since the film is quite dark visually and 3D worsens that sometimes. The film is quite dark thematically as well, also fecking brutal sometimes. The opening is very similar to part 1 where its more quiet talk but it quickly gets to more action later on, when it comes to the Fight against Hogwarts it is pretty full on. There is quite a few deaths, but I don't know if they were done really well. They were a bit to glossed over. Also bloody hell the good guys like killing people as well.

Have to say the most brutal death had to be Snape's, oh god even though it was behind a glass it was clear what was happenning to him. Also that pensieve moment where you find out Snape's motivations absolutly stunning. It is just probably one of the best and most emotionally wrenching moments of the film, I really wish that bit was a lot longer because it was really great. Props for Alan Rickman in this film, he didn't have much screentime so a lot of his emotions was in his facial features and just the way he acted.

I have to say the finale for me was quite good to be honest, there are some random moments that kind of come out of nowhere. The kiss between Ron and Hermione for one, its like they just randomly decided to kiss. Also I was wondering where Hagrid was and he just randomly pops up. There was some cool visual moments, and the great one was the whole "otherworld" scene. Also the 19 years later really worked for me in the film even though it really didn't in the book, I guess probably because it was mostly visual.

Would definitly say that I was diissapointed by the 7th book but these 2 films have actually improved it a lot. Really touching that it has ended and I would love to see these 2 films one after the other.

Vague-rant
06-08-2011, 11:46 AM
The Exorcism of Emily Rose
Wait, so Affleck has actually been in stuff worth watching since Good Will Hunting? Clearly I'm behind the times here.

Don't know about "been in" but he seems like he could be a pretty decent Director. Gone Baby Gone and The Town were both his creations and they were both pretty good.

8-bit
10-08-2011, 04:01 AM
I saw Bunny and the Bull the other day. the adverts said it was from one of the people who worked on The Mighty Boosh, so I was expecting it to be a like a misguided, extra long, tv episode that they try to pass off as a full movie, but it was actually pretty good. its nice to have your expectations proven wrong sometimes.

squirrel
12-08-2011, 04:47 PM
The Warlords

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ok_5CKAOch8&feature=related

A Chinese film jointly produced by Hong Kong and mainland China producers, starred by well-known Andy Lau, Jet Li and Takeshi Kaneshiro (this one I always wonder if he's Taiwanese or Japanese). During the middle of the Qing Dynasty, the last feudal (by feudal we refer to the feudal class system, feudal land system was not tolerated by the Qing rulers after the first few decades of their ruling), the Taiping Rebellion, lasted from 1853 to 1864, was said to have cost over 70 million life, higher than death tolls of the Second World War. Taiping rebels were rebels who were inspired by Christianity against the corrupted Qing authority. The film is about how Qing army general Pang Qingyun, bandit turned general Zho Erhu and Jiang Wuyang became sworn blood brothers to form an army to fight for the Qing government against the seemingly unstoppable rebels. Yet, cruel political reality forced them to turn on each other, and after the victory of the Qing court over the bloody civil war, their life ended in tragedy. Most of the film, aside from the story background itself, is based on truth events. Yet for unknown reason, the producers chose to change the names of those historical figures.

The theme of the film can be summarized by a statement of Zho Erhu as the reason why poor people should join the military, "Since we are to be the bandit, we should be the greatest!"

There are three version of this film I am aware of: Hong Kong and Taiwan version, mainland China version, and western version. I strong recommend Hong Kong and Taiwan version. It's very common that English subs is inserted in a Hong Kong film.

8-bit
15-08-2011, 05:52 PM
Planet of the apes marathon yesterday, in order from bestest to worstest.

planet of the apes
conquest
escape
beneath
battle

the thing that interests me the most about these films is that they were big blockbuster movies, you could even say family movies, but every single one of them has a downer ending. everyone either ends up dead or is doomed to repeat the same events that lead to the second film. its just not the sort of thing studios would even dare to put in the big movies these days, and even though the quality falls after the first they should still be applauded for having the guts to go through with it. how many family films can you name where the world is completely destroyed and everyone dies?

the films do have a lot of plot holes between them, like how Cornelius and Zira were going to go on trial after the first film, but appear safe and almost friendly with Dr. Zaius in the second. the way that Cornelius quotes ape scripture in the third film, telling of the origin of the apes as if it were common knowledge. this is obviously completely inaccurate since the information was a supposed to be a sort of state secret, even after the first film he shouldn't have known that in such detail.

then there is the fourth film, and since that needed Caesar to lead the revolution, events that could only happen hundreds of years in the future (as Cornelius tells us) are brought forward to be twenty years after the third. ignoring how ridiculous it is to think that apes evolved to the point of speech within twenty years, we are asked to believe that america has become some sort of fascist state with high level tech in that time, just because cats and dogs died out? well as long as you turn your brain off its still good, but still, people don't check scripts?

Rii
28-08-2011, 12:38 PM
La Femme Nikita

I first saw this in French class at school and it's interesting which bits I remembered from that first viewing and which I didn't. Well, 'damning of my younger self' would be another way of putting it. I remembered the gang shootout, the pen thing, and the Streyr (which has to be one of the most awesome rifles ever, and not just because the Australian Army uses it) in the bathroom. What I hadn't remembered was, well, everything that makes this film worth watching.

This is not a complicated film, nor a deep one. The plotting is implausible where not outright ridiculous. And yet it works, and what makes it work are the characters who could almost be real people. They're archetypal, but not archetypes. Nikita herself is obviously the star here, being revealed to us in all her myriad facets over the course of the film, but the supporting cast is well textured also. Even Victor, poured from the 'ruthless professional' mold, seems delightfully human in his single-mindedness; most of us have probably met someone like him before, minus the gun.

It strikes me that Luc Besson's later film Leon: The Professional is very similar to Nikita, not merely in its subject matter but also in that both films are elevated above other, superficially similar films by the care given to their characters.


Senna

This is another film I saw for personal, historical reasons. I'm not a Formula One fan, yet I remember sitting as a child in front of the TV marvelling at Senna's ridiculous talent in the wet. Of course we all know what happened next and it's been about that long since I paid the sport any mind. So when this doco came around my interest was piqued both on account of its subject matter, and the largely stellar reception it has received to date. So what of it?

Well... it does the job. Honestly, I'm not sure where all the praise is coming from here. It's unadventurous, overly long, skimps on detail in parts and overly indulges its commentators halting and directionless musings in others. When We Were Kings this is not. On the plus side the inclusion of Prost adds much to the production, and I'm pleased that they didn't push the easy and undoubtedly tempting Senna/Hero vs. Prost/Villain narrative.

I found the film engaging enough, but that was almost entirely down to its subject matter. The execution, OTOH, could've been that of a TV production. I don't know where all the love for this film is coming from, except for the obvious: because it's Senna.

For some reason I now feel the urge to play Codies' F1 2011.


Don't know about "been in" but he seems like he could be a pretty decent Director.

Oh, right. Well don't I look stupid now?

Cable
28-08-2011, 01:16 PM
I saw Senna quite recently and I really enjoyed it.
Of course I am merely a youngling so wasn't aware of it when it all happened so i was hearing most of it for the first time. I thought it was pretty great though, great old footage of races and behind the scenes stuff and presenting formula 1 and Senna and the other drivers in a way i'd never seen before. Plus he seemed like a pretty awesome dude.

Rii
28-08-2011, 01:56 PM
I thought it was pretty great though, great old footage of races and behind the scenes stuff and presenting formula 1 and Senna and the other drivers in a way i'd never seen before.

I guess maybe I'm missing something in not having followed Formula 1 to really appreciate the contrast between the face of modern F1 and what the film shows us.


Plus he seemed like a pretty awesome dude.

I actually wish they'd gone into more detail re: Senna the man. We didn't learn a lot about him outside Formula 1. Hell I think the film gave me a better handle on Prost the man than it did Senna.

Drake Sigar
28-08-2011, 03:02 PM
I saw inception for the first time. My theory is that Cobb went into a permanent dream state after the death of his wife, and the totem toppling represents his refusal to accept his new reality. He then creates this elaborate ‘one last job’ fantasy to forgive himself.

Oh, spoilers.

Xercies
28-08-2011, 04:15 PM
Had a bit of a nazism film double bill it seems.

American History X - Really interesting character study I have to say this is, I really felt that Edward Nortan was a smart kid just kind of perverted into something hateful and how his brother was becoming like him. Doesn't hit lightly and when you finally figure out why they turned out this way and how there getting their life back it becomes quite heartfelt and really quite lovely. The ending though...I don't know...I wouldn't have minded the happy ending but they had to end it shockingly like that. I don't really get what its trying to say.

Downfall - This definitly doesn't pull any punches by depicting the last days of Hitler and the third reich and Germany. Its quite sad sometimes, a little comical, a little tragic, and quite dark. Hitler is played really well I have to say, I don't know if I should say this but I kind of felt a little tinge of sadness about him about his dreams being taken away from him and him totally losing like that. It is shown he is quite kind sometimes, but also shown that he can be quite horrible and evil as well. Hitler is actually very interesting characters. The other characters are quite interesting as well, and it does kind of show you that maybe people were a little caught up in Hitler's rheteric and just couldn't think of surrendering. Lots and lots of suicides at the last half hour. Pretty damn good film, definitly recommended.

Also I really wish there was more films about the nazi side, and Hitler in general. Interesting subject.

Super 8 - Pure Steven Speilburg even though it wasn't directed by him. Pretty good story about a group of boys and 1 girl making a flm together and finding about a big conspiricy happenning around them. Its very very good when It is focusing on the kids and it becomes like a great Speilburg films. It kind of goes a little downhill whenever the kids father is on screen following the conspiricy, you could totally take away his character and it kind of wouldn't make a difference. I really like this film and it definitly touches a lot of the emotionalness of it. Except for the kids father, his make up with the kid is a little hollow because he acts like a dick throughout the whole entire movie and it doesn't seem like his character really changes.

Gerbick
28-08-2011, 09:51 PM
Well, what with it being the summer hols and all, I've watched the following in recent weeks:

Monty Python and the Holy Grail - Kids loved it (first introduction for them all to the Python world, even though one of them is named Monty!).

Labou - pish-poor treasure-hunting film for kids. Cross between The Goonies and Flight of the Navigator, without the charm and fun of either.

Rii
29-08-2011, 04:24 PM
American History X Really interesting character study I have to say this is [....] The ending though...I don't know...I wouldn't have minded the happy ending but they had to end it shockingly like that. I don't really get what its trying to say.

I have to say I've never really thought of the film as a character study, more as a definitive work on the personal and social effects of hatred and violence, applicable even beyond racism per se. As such I thought the ending was fitting, a commentary on the enormity of the barriers to change. "And they lived happily ever after" by comparison would've fallen flat, and been kinda dishonest. I think it comes down to our difference in perspective about what the film is.


Downfall - This definitly doesn't pull any punches by depicting the last days of Hitler and the third reich and Germany. Its quite sad sometimes, a little comical, a little tragic, and quite dark. [....] Lots and lots of suicides at the last half hour. Pretty damn good film, definitly recommended.

Also I really wish there was more films about the nazi side, and Hitler in general. Interesting subject.

Yes. I'm glad that we're finally seeing more films of this nature. That scene with Magda Goebbels and her children was chilling.

DiamondDog
29-08-2011, 07:29 PM
Have either of you seen Cross of Iron?

Rii
29-08-2011, 07:49 PM
I haven't, no.

DiamondDog
29-08-2011, 08:19 PM
1977 film by Sam Peckinpah about the Eastern Front from the perspective of the German Army. Amazing film. Has James Coburn as a cynical vet that's won the Iron Cross and ends up under the command of a Prussian aristocrat looking to win himself the Iron Cross. Really it's the kind of story you've seen told about the British Army a million times. Posh guy gets command because of his status but doesn't know anything about war and sees it as a route to glory. Gets forced to deal with the reality by a guy that knows how horrific a real battle is.

Except it's from the perspective of Germans and it's a Peckinpah film, so there are more layers and lots of insanity.

I've not watched a huge amount of war films but there are some good stories told about different sides of the war. Stalingrad, Days of Glory and Sophie Scholl - The Final Days are all worth watching. If you've not already, of course.

Kadayi
30-08-2011, 09:16 PM
Well with my forum downtime and lack of DXHR to play I ended up watching a few films over the weekend.

Super.

Kind of like Kick Ass without the jokes and on acid. Pretty disjointed overall. Also Ellen Page is just doomed to be a short woman trapped in a girls body.

Rango.

Brilliant from beginning to end. I didn't know anything about it, but that Johnny Depp was involved, but I have to say it was outstanding, and excellent animation. Worthwhile and kind of adult (but not in the way one might suspect).

Battle: Los Angeles

For an alien invasion movie no where near as terrible I'd heard, but saying that still an alien invasion movie. Better than Skyline by a country mile. Also Arron Echkart has the most insane chin ever.

Similar
11-09-2011, 12:03 PM
Thor (2011)
From total douchebag to decent person in thirty minutes (they might base a self help book on this movie).
Also, Asgaard seems to have somehow ended up on Krypton.
Not a terrible movie, but I pretty much forgot about it two minutes after it had ended.

Blood - The Last Vampire (2009)
Not quite sure if this is based on a comic. I remember watching the anime and thinking I was missing some back story and it's much the same with the live action movie. Mostly okay, but after hurrying through what scraps of story they'd managed to come up with they suddenly run out and the movie ends rather anticlimatically (I seem to remember the anime did the same).

Priest (2011)
Another we-only-have-budget-for-x-number-of-minutes movie with a rushed storyboard style backstory that doesn't fit the movie at all (but at least it's there) and the bad guy is overplaying and doesn't fit very well either. That said, I still mostly enjoyed it. If they'd fleshed it out and taken some more time with it, it could have been rather nice.

The Eagle (2011) (also known as "The Eagle of the Ninth", it seems).
Pleasant surprise. Probably helps I have a thing for Roman infantry, but I thought the movie worked quite well (except perhaps for the two main characters' smirking in the final scene). Also, good soundtrack.

... Pretty sure I watched several others, but they must have been very forgettable.

Rii
11-09-2011, 12:10 PM
Re: my comments re: Senna: turns out the version I saw ran a fair bit longer than the official version. Oops.


Thor (2011)
From total douchebag to decent person in thirty minutes (they might base a self help book on this movie).
Also, Asgaard seems to have somehow ended up on Krypton.
Not a terrible movie, but I pretty much forgot about it two minutes after it had ended.

How could you ignore the controversy of a black man in white man land??????

Similar
11-09-2011, 12:44 PM
How could you ignore the controversy of a black man in white man land??????
oh, durn. I always miss stuff like that. I blame my upbringing (my mother should have put more points into Controversy, I think).


I just remembered that I also watched

Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides (2011).
The only thing I can remember of it is some water that flowed up instead of down and something about mermaids.
So it may not have made all that much of an impression.

Falling Skies, season 1.
The last episode shuffled too much between 'rather lame' and 'decent', but up until then, I thought it was okay. It's completely standard fare, no surprises at all, but if you don't expect much it's not the worst way to waste your time.

The Walking Dead, season 1.
I think the series might be better if you don't know the comics. I do, so I kind of miss the sense of dread and bleakness from it. Not that the series is all unicorns and rainbows, but ... where the comics are about people who only hope to survive another day, and barely even that, the series has more of a feeling that there's some greater hope to aim for. Which changes things quite a bit.
It's quite good, though.

JohnnyK
11-09-2011, 04:38 PM
I just watched "Attack the Block", that was surprisingly entertaining.

Also, The Prestige (Bale, Jackman & Cain) a few weeks ago - excellent movie.

@Similar, I did not know the WD-comics and enjoyed the series, so you might be on to something.

Similar
11-09-2011, 07:59 PM
Another one I just watched:

Ironclad (2011).
Rather enjoyable, though I suspect not knowing what Danish sounds like would improve it quite a lot; the 'Danish' the mercenaries speak is a tad jarring when you do know. And their leader is called "Tiberius", which I kind of doubt has ever been a very common Danish name (could be his father was just fond of Roman names, but...). Also several continuity errors.
The fighting scenes are pretty decent and it's nice that it's not just swords, but all kinds of weapons. Especially the battle hammer (the kind with a fairly normal sized hammer head on a long shaft) fights are convincing.

Wooly Wugga Wugga
11-09-2011, 09:55 PM
Watched in the last month or so :

Priest - I really enjoyed this when I watched it. I thought it was a better Judge Dredd than Judge Dredd was.

Rango - Loved this as well. Loved the occasional surrealism. Left me feeling warm and fuzzy. All good.

Knight and Day - Made it through about 30 minutes but it felt like about an hour and a half. There is only so much smug Tom Cruise that I can handle these days and they even managed to make Cameron Diaz look ugly. Just painful.

Similar
12-09-2011, 11:38 AM
I just watched "Attack the Block", that was surprisingly entertaining.
Thanks for the tip (I'd never heard about it). Excellent movie.

Xercies
13-09-2011, 10:19 AM
Thor - Enjoyable nonsense. The main character wa great as the lead character, an asshole at the start and then became more likeble. Sir Anthony Hopkins was great, and the guy who played Loki brought a slimy snake like perfermonce which was great. Surprisingly this is more of a fish out of water comedy but it isn't to cliched and it works surprisingly well and is quite funny. The way Asgard is done is really well. Also very excited to see Captain America and that The Avengers is only going to be next year. Some part of me is a child who probably would have blown his head if it happened back then

Drake Sigar
13-09-2011, 01:58 PM
I saw The Social Network (talk about being late to the party) and am prepared to call it our generation’s Network (1976), not necessarily because that’s what I believe, but because the statement just sent several readers into molar-exploding rages.

Seriously though, great (albiet entirely fictional) movie.

Rii
13-09-2011, 03:28 PM
I saw The Social Network (talk about being late to the party) and am prepared to call it our generation’s Network (1976), not necessarily because that’s what I believe, but because the statement just sent several readers into molar-exploding rages.

Seriously though, great (albiet entirely fictional) movie.

/wince

I haven't actually seen it, although I've got as far as downloading it. It's not because I don't use Facebook, more that I'm afraid of the buttons the film might push for me. Even after so much acclimatisation the phrase 'social networking' still causes me to recoil on some level. And so the film has been easy to put off in favour of ... anything else.

Xercies
13-09-2011, 03:31 PM
I really liked The Social Network actually, the main character is unlikeble throughout with a few touches of maybe likebility thrown in there but he still comes across like an asshole. Which I quite like to be honest. The story is pretty interesting, and its Directed By David Fincher! What more do you need?

Drake Sigar
13-09-2011, 04:22 PM
It’s one of those rare movies that excels in every department. There’s this innocent little piano tune which repeats over the story to gradually transform into a chilling piece. The editing successfully makes hacking seem like the most exciting thing in the world without approaching CSI territory. The performances are superb all round - Justin Timberlake is a force of nature, Andrew Garfield makes me more hopeful towards the Spiderman reboot, and Jesse Eisenberg is able to convey the subtle emotional shifts in a socially inept character whose desire for acceptance eventually leads him to destroy what few meaningful (and extremely one-sided) relationships he had left.

DigitalSignalX
13-09-2011, 05:19 PM
Watched Kevin Smith's latest, "Red State" last night. Very interesting film, starts off like a low budget horror/thriller and then evolves first into a portrayal on how religious zeal can be subverted into the complete antithesis of the tenants of Christianity. Then in the last half it evolves into this massive Waco shootout / post 9-11 government oppression of rights statement. It's definetly a left turn from Smiths usual style, including the superb "Dogma." Part of me wishes he could have focused the film on just one of these three elements instead of casting his net so wide. John Goodman surprises with a strong showing (and he looks like he's lost a lot of weight too) as the reluctant, methodical ATF agent who ends up in the end representing Christian values the most. Overall I liked it, and kind of wish he'd had a larger budget and more room to flesh it out because the premise is very solid, but the execution feels rushed.

redox
14-09-2011, 12:07 AM
Just watched a clip of The Thing. Video and info - http://www.wired.com/underwire/2011/09/video-get-a-glimpse-of-the-thing/

Xercies
14-09-2011, 11:44 PM
Chinatown - Pretty interesting Noir like thriller, it definitely had me hooked through the twists and turns of the story. The end reveal is pretty surprising and it ends on a really tragic note like most Noirs do. I kind of wanted it to solve itself and the hero to defeat the conspiracy it seemed, but it wasn't that type of movie and I liked it for that.

cjlr
15-09-2011, 01:11 AM
"Now, we RIDE (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_B1YU8zs2oc)."
Rango's pretty fun. Some friends and I went to a free showing of that in the park during the summer, we were impressed and surprised. Well, I really liked it. They did too I guess. We left the 'must have EKSPLOSHUNS!!1!' guys at home.

Chinatown is great.

My roommate and I watched In Bruges a couple nights ago. Great movie. Beautiful, intelligent, funny... Even my roommate thought it was pretty good, even though he's one of the ones who tends towards the "I leik eksploshuns" school of film studies.

Cable
15-09-2011, 07:15 AM
I would also like to say Chinatown is great. It's genre is technically neo-noir by the way. I also really liked In Bruges, was kind of just expecting it to be funny but there was a lot more too it than that in reality.

I just saw the Departed which was pretty awesome I thought. Great actors and plenty of twists and turns, a good action/thriller.

Alex Bakke
15-09-2011, 09:20 AM
I watched Lon the other day, it was pretty excellent.

Xercies
15-09-2011, 09:45 AM
In Bruges is definitly one of those films where it has you laughing one moment and kind of crying over the tradgedy of it. Really great movie and you kind of wish for more.


It's genre is technically neo-noir

I always thought neo-noir had to have sci-fi elements in it

Alex Bakke
15-09-2011, 09:47 AM
A- A bottle!

Cable
15-09-2011, 12:20 PM
I always thought neo-noir had to have sci-fi elements in it oh, i could be wrong then, i thought it just meant the sort of second coming of noir, since the originals were around the 1940s (double indemnity and stuff?) and then chinatown was 1974. Wiki says neo-noir so maybe it has more than one meaning

genres are silly anyway

Jams O'Donnell
15-09-2011, 12:24 PM
Nah, neo-noir is just a term to differentiate modern noir from classic noir (30s-50s, roughly).

wcaypahwat
15-09-2011, 05:17 PM
Woochi: Goblin Wizard.

Decent Korean action-adventure. It's also nice that comedy can transcend the language barrier.

Rii
15-09-2011, 05:29 PM
+1 for Chinatown love.


I watched Lon the other day, it was pretty excellent.

I saw it again recently also off the back of Nikita (which, incidentally, I still think is the superior film). It was my first time seeing the "international" cut wherein - amongst other changes - Mathilda asks Leon to sleep with her. It's been too long since I've seen the US cut to make a real comparison, but looking at the sheer amount of Mathilda/Leon material that was cut for that release I find it difficult to believe that it could be the more emotionally engaging and thereby effective film.


Also, The Prestige (Bale, Jackman & Cain) a few weeks ago - excellent movie.

Yeah, definitely. Nolan's Batman flicks are tolerable (which is more than I can say for most superhero flicks) but I'll take his other work any day of the week and twice on Sundays. There were signs with Inception that he's been chained by the system mind...

Xercies
15-09-2011, 05:43 PM
I think with Nolan he is just making the same thrillers he did with Memento and his first project there just got more and more budget

Rii
15-09-2011, 06:18 PM
Thing is I think Inception could've been a rather better film than it was: made shorter and tighter by taking a hacksaw to the excessive and excessively long action scenes, perhaps even substituting some of them with non-combat sequences. I think Nolan was given an action quota to fill - or perhaps less explicitly was under pressure to produce a film with Dark Knight-esque blockbuster potential - and the film suffered for it. Regardless of whether the pressure was external or internal, I think a better film could've - no, would've - been produced on half the budget.

Xercies
15-09-2011, 08:36 PM
To be honest I'm actually glad we got a lot of those action scenes they were very inventive and well that topsy tervy fight has made me go wow at a film, know this I haven't gone wow at a film for a very long time. Also its probably one of the most gripping films I've ever watched, even after the third time I'm still on the edge of my seat wondering if they will complete the mission. Nah I think its a really great film. Dark Knight on the other hand could have trimmed a lot of the action sequences and a few of the bits, reworked Harvey dent so he could have had a film of his own as Two Face. Dark Knight I felt was pretty bloated as a film, Inception I thought was actually just right.

Kadayi
15-09-2011, 09:37 PM
Dark Knight I felt was pretty bloated as a film, Inception I thought was actually just right.

Seconded. I think TDK gets a lot more praise than it deserves in part because of Heath Ledger dying shortly afterwards. Albeit he was enjoyable as the joker, the plot was daft as a brush at points, to the extent that as times I thought they'd handed the helm back to Tim Burton. I do agree that inception could of been tighter, but it's a more rounded film overall.

Alex Bakke
15-09-2011, 09:59 PM
Has anyone here seen Harsh Times? Features Bale, I watched it today. Not quite sure what to think of it.

Drake Sigar
15-09-2011, 10:56 PM
I like to play The Dark Knight drinking game; it involves taking a shot every time there’s a sudden transition between day and night, and when the credits roll you have to guess how many days have gone by altogether.

ColOfNature
17-09-2011, 12:34 AM
Just watched Priest. What a crock. Does anyone alse think Paul Bettany is seriously selling himself short taking all these daft roles? Priest, Legion, DaVinci Code... he's better than this. He was great in Master and Commander and A Beautiful Mind, and seemed pretty good in Wimbledon (although I wasn't paying that much attention when that was on). He's actually a decent actor - so why does he keep showing up in these ludicrous films?

Xercies
19-09-2011, 04:54 PM
The Pianist - Very very good and heart wrenching portrayal of Polish Jews and one person, the pianist of the films titles survival against the german invaders. Have to say the Blu-Ray of this looked absolutely amazing, I think I've become a convert of blu-ray, just looks so detailed and broken buildings especially look amazing. My god did this guy survive a lot it bloody is harrowing and a tale of survival with a few darkly humorous stuff here and there. I like how a lot of the events in this film are filmed from the guys perspective, from a window or from a little crack in one, gives you a sense of being there with him not knowing what really is happening. Also happens with the sound a lot. Though one thing, is there supposed to be subtitles when the germans speak? I can understand maybe a few of them, it doesn't matter really what there saying but as it goes along it can be quite crucial like the German officer that lets him live. Not to sure if that was ,eat to be for artistic statement or the blu-ray forgot to come with subtitles.

Alex Bakke
19-09-2011, 05:45 PM
I watched Fight Club, it was quite good.

Anthile
19-09-2011, 05:47 PM
I didn't like The Pianist at all. It's solid and all but it has OSCAR BAIT written all over it. It was really uncomfortable to watch.

Xercies
19-09-2011, 06:53 PM
I do have to agree its another, Jews in ghetto and fight for survival to say that what happened to the jews was bad. But to be honest it still kept me engaged, and well we should really have films which do show the horror of it. People can get a bit tired of it, but it happened and well judging from the look of it it was very painful for the people involved!

BobsLawnService
23-09-2011, 05:46 AM
Finished watching Falling Skies and I'm a bit miffed abouth the squandered potential. It's pretty much a melting pot of at times contradictory ideas. There is always a cliched character when the plot needs one and Popes character is particularly lacking any coherent development. I think his character arc is particularly poorly written.

But the main thing that bugs me is:

Spoiler

In one episode the Skitters are mercilessly executing the harnessed children and in the other they are shown as being maternal and loving to them. I understand that the executions were just a way to allow the son to escape but it completely breaks the fiction of the world.

Also I think that Spielberg is going a little senile. This isn't Close Encounters mate.

QuantaCat
23-09-2011, 07:57 AM
Just saw Hanna, and I had the feeling throughout the film, that they tried to be an indie film waaaay too much, but failed. Also the editing is iffy at times.

Rii
23-09-2011, 08:06 AM
Just saw Hanna, and I had the feeling throughout the film, that they tried to be an indie film waaaay too much, but failed. Also the editing is iffy at times.

Do you remember that bit where one of the Bad Guys is rolling a pair of metallic balls around in his hand? Would you happen to know what those are called?

EDIT: BAODING BALLS!!!

*rushes out to buy some*

hamster
23-09-2011, 08:49 AM
Wasn't that impressed by Hanna. I thought the film just didn't take itself too seriously.

QuantaCat
23-09-2011, 08:57 AM
Oh but in contrast, THE GUARD was fantastic! I recommend it to all.

Alex Bakke
23-09-2011, 05:18 PM
I just watched K-PAX, starring Jeff Bridges and Kevin Spacey. Good.

Similar
23-09-2011, 06:05 PM
The Dead (2010).
Odd movie. Sort of like two directors met a good effects guy and felt they had to use him for something, but then couldn't really agree on where they wanted to go with the movie (I think there's only one director). Parts of it seem to be going for some depth and then you get weird action movie cliches inbetween. Acting is rather uneven too. I did kind of enjoy it anyway.

Age of Heroes (2011).
Reminded me a bit of some of the war movies from the sixties and seventies, Kelly's Heroes, Where Eagles Dare and such, except it's not as tight as those. It feels like it builds up to something but then just sort of ends. There's also an odd scene with an overly psychopathic SS type that seems a little out of place. Still, good actors and it is enjoyable.

The Road (2009).
Not sure what to think... It's sort of possibly good and annoying at the same time.

Xercies
23-09-2011, 07:44 PM
The Road was probably one of the most depressing movies i probably ever seen that year, which is kind of why I liked it. Post-Apocalypse is supposed to be kinda bleak.

Similar
23-09-2011, 08:02 PM
The Road was probably one of the most depressing movies i probably ever seen that year, which is kind of why I liked it. Post-Apocalypse is supposed to be kinda bleak.
yeah, I don't really know. Maybe it was the ending that bothered me.

Kadayi
23-09-2011, 08:55 PM
yeah, I don't really know. Maybe it was the ending that bothered me.

The ending is true to the book. I don't think the film is bad and I though Viggo was great as the father, but the book is a modern classic and I'd advise anyone to read that over watching the film.

Alex Bakke
24-09-2011, 12:16 AM
The Road was probably one of the most depressing movies i probably ever seen that year, which is kind of why I liked it. Post-Apocalypse is supposed to be kinda bleak.

Not True. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y3gTYigez48)

DigitalSignalX
24-09-2011, 12:44 AM
Wasn't that impressed by Hanna. I thought the film just didn't take itself too seriously.

The best thing about Hanna IMHO was the sound track by the Chemical Brothers.

edit: looking back at the thread and the discussion over Chinatown, I remember that Jack Nicholas had made a sequel to it: The Two Jakes. However I can't recall seeing it, anyone have thoughts on it?

Also big thanks for the heads up on the international version of Leon (33 minutes cut!?) and Attack the Block - looks hilarious. All three have been queued for download but will be a ways off, still making my way through Boardwalk Empire this week.

Rii
24-09-2011, 04:39 AM
The ending is true to the book. I don't think the film is bad and I though Viggo was great as the father, but the book is a modern classic and I'd advise anyone to read that over watching the film.

I couldn't handle McCarthy's prose style. I managed with No Country For Old Men which did something similar (I've no clue about the rest of his oeuvre) but possibly only because I had Tommy Lee Jones' voice in my head to serve as a guide there.

I enjoyed the film though. Special Achievement in the Colour Gray. :P

archonsod
24-09-2011, 04:27 PM
Just watched The Extraordinary Adventures of Adele Blanc-Sec. It's .... well, I like it. I'm still not entirely sure what just happened though.

Donjo
24-09-2011, 05:35 PM
I couldn't handle McCarthy's prose style. I managed with No Country For Old Men which did something similar (I've no clue about the rest of his oeuvre) but possibly only because I had Tommy Lee Jones' voice in my head to serve as a guide there.

I enjoyed the film though. Special Achievement in the Colour Gray. :P

Aw, McCarthy is the king! I just finished The Orchard Keeper, it's really brilliant. I quite like the Road (the film) but I'd agree with Kadayi here, if you liked the film, read the book! And then everything else McCarthy's written!

Rii
24-09-2011, 06:22 PM
Schindler's List

I'm not sure you're allowed to criticise this film, but here goes: it was overly long and, towards the end, overwrought and self-indulgent. Much of the last hour could've been cut, including the entire Auschwitz sequence: "yay, he's rescuing them", "oh no, the train got diverted!", "yay, he got them back!" ... complete waste of time. More than that the fake gassing sequence was totally uncool and felt as if I'd stepped into a cheap thriller flick for a minute.

There's a lot to like; in some ways it goes above and beyond what one would expect of a film dealing with such horrors. The flaws are vexing not merely because they mar an otherwise superlative film, but because they're flaws that are so typical of Hollywood, which has never heard of restraint, 'less is more' or 'show, don't tell'. I'd only seen Schindler's List once before, many years ago, and going into it again I was, frankly, skeptical. The first 90 minutes saw me cast my doubts aside - having to pick them back up again was depressing.

Xercies
24-09-2011, 07:21 PM
I quite like Schindlers List at the beginning because it shows Schindler wasn't all about saving the jews early on he was about exploiting something to gain a business and it was the Jew played by Sir Ben Kingsley that was the one really doing a lot until Schindler realised what the nazis were actually doing. But it is a bit to long.

The problem I find is that they tell the same story, one of the reasons I really liked Downfall is that its a story I've never really heard of and its quite interesting! Please tell me other stories about WW2 or before WW2, or even WW1!

Similar
24-09-2011, 09:42 PM
Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen (2009).
13:22 - started thinking about doing something else.
16:43 - started Minecraft.
18:03 - started fast forwarding through large parts of the movie.

Nice effects, shame about the rest.

Rii
25-09-2011, 01:41 PM
I quite like Schindlers List at the beginning because it shows Schindler wasn't all about saving the jews early on he was about exploiting something to gain a business

Yeah, absolutely. I think the film did an excellent job of showing humanity in all its various aspects when it would've been so easy to paint everything in - if you'll forgive me - black-and-white. Goethe too. In no small part due to Fiennes' superlative performance I think he'd have to be one of the most memorable villains of cinema. Evil as a man-child.


The problem I find is that they tell the same story, one of the reasons I really liked Downfall is that its a story I've never really heard of and its quite interesting! Please tell me other stories about WW2 or before WW2, or even WW1!

I'm not much of a war or period piece person ... umm, there's the classics Battleship Potemkin, Casabalanca and The Third Man ... The Thin Red Line (by Terrence Mallick who also directed this year's talking point Tree of Life which I haven't seen yet because I fail) is a rather unconventional war film in a very conventional setting; "a class of first-year philosophy students invades Guadalcanal" is one summary of it that always makes me laugh ... Enemy at the Gates is an ok Zaitsev/Stalingrad film. The Lives of Others is a recent German film that depicts the domestic surveillance operations of the Stasi during the Cold War and is pretty good. Alas, my well doesn't runneth much deeper than that. :P

kirrus
29-09-2011, 05:25 PM
[snip]The problem I find is that they tell the same story, one of the reasons I really liked Downfall is that its a story I've never really heard of and its quite interesting! Please tell me other stories about WW2 or before WW2, or even WW1!

You might like Defiance then.

outoffeelinsobad
29-09-2011, 08:27 PM
Oh but in contrast, THE GUARD was fantastic! I recommend it to all.

Agreed. Brendan Gleeson carries the whole film. Dunno what happened to Don Cheadle though; he seems to have lost his charm since his early-aughts films.

I'm really excited to see Perfect Sense. Ewan McGregor turns everything he touches into gold.

I just watched Bunraku. Really want that vest Josh Hartnett is rockin' (http://www.badhaven.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/bunraku-image-josh-hartnett-398x6001.jpg).

LowKey
29-09-2011, 11:08 PM
saw Tucker & Dale VS Evil last week, couldn't recommend it enough it was great

ColOfNature
30-09-2011, 12:55 AM
Primer. Time travel, eh? It'll fuck with your head. Good idea, but poorly developed. If these guys can't come up with a better way of solving their problems using partially-closed causality loops then they're really not trying hard enough.

Angel Dust
30-09-2011, 01:35 AM
I quite like Schindlers List at the beginning because it shows Schindler wasn't all about saving the jews early on he was about exploiting something to gain a business and it was the Jew played by Sir Ben Kingsley that was the one really doing a lot until Schindler realised what the nazis were actually doing. But it is a bit to long.

The problem I find is that they tell the same story, one of the reasons I really liked Downfall is that its a story I've never really heard of and its quite interesting! Please tell me other stories about WW2 or before WW2, or even WW1!
I'm no war film expert either but I have a few recommendations:

Come and See - a rare look at WW2 from the Soviet civilian side. It is by far the most horrific war film I've seen and it's not because it's graphic (although it certainly doesn't shy away from anything) but because it feels both raw and real, and like a feverish nightmare.

Kanal - Andrzej Wajda is a director well worth checking out. Quite a number of his films are set during WW2 and all of them chronicle sides of stories rarely told. I've seen two, this one and the more recent Katyn, and they are both very good. Kanal is my favourite of the two. It takes place during the final days of the 1944 Warsaw ghetto uprising, focusing on a group of Polish citizens who have withdrawn to the sewer systems to escape from the German army. Bleak, very intense and a film that really stays with you. Kanal is part of a trilogy, with the other two films being A Generation and Ashes and Diamonds neither of which I've been able to track down.

Ivan's Childhood - Tarkovsky's (Solaris, Stalker) debut film. It's the story of a war orphan who becomes an intelligence scout for the Russian army. It's naturally harrowing stuff, and like Come And See is a mix of the real and the surreal, but being Tarkovsky it's also full of breathtaking visual poetry.

The White Ribbon - A very dark drama, set in a German village leading up to WW1 but it's less about WW1 as it is about the social and psychological origins of WW2 or as Haneke himself puts it "the origin of every type of terrorism, be it of political or religious nature." In typical Haneke fashion it is discomforting and quietly disturbing without being explicitly shocking.

None of these are films you'll wan't to watch if you're looking for a good time but if you're in the mood for something different ala Downfall then give 'em a go.

Xercies
30-09-2011, 11:57 AM
A Tarkovsky war film, that I might definitly put on the list, since I have been wanting to watch Solaris for awhile as well. Really liked his Stalker.

Rii
01-10-2011, 04:42 AM
The White Ribbon - A very dark drama, set in a German village leading up to WW1 but it's less about WW1 as it is about the social and psychological origins of WW2 or as Haneke himself puts it "the origin of every type of terrorism, be it of political or religious nature." In typical Haneke fashion it is discomforting and quietly disturbing without being explicitly shocking.

God, how did I miss this? The White Ribbon is sublime. And perhaps it was only because I'm slow and wasn't reflective of others' experience with the film, but my awareness of the goings-on was constrained in such a way that there arrived quite late in the piece a moment of awful realisation that made me almost physically ill. Brilliant stuff.

Thanks for your other recommendations also, I shall investigate!

DiamondDog
01-10-2011, 03:07 PM
I'll add to that recommendation of Come and See. Needs to be watched.

Regeneration is also worth a look. Based on a novel about the treatment of shell-shocked WW1 soldiers. Not read the book myself, but I found the film interesting.

Joseph-Sulphur
02-10-2011, 12:11 AM
Watched Drive. I was blown away, its much better than I expected. Now I see why it's got such a buzz. Great direction, amazing style, Gosling exudes McQueen cool and the soundtrack is superb.

Kadayi
02-10-2011, 09:23 PM
ICome and See - a rare look at WW2 from the Soviet civilian side. It is by far the most horrific war film I've seen and it's not because it's graphic (although it certainly doesn't shy away from anything) but because it feels both raw and real, and like a feverish nightmare.

It's unremittingly grim. Definitely worth seeing, but pretty harrowing viewing.

Anyway


Watched Drive. I was blown away, its much better than I expected. Now I see why it's got such a buzz. Great direction, amazing style, Gosling exudes McQueen cool and the soundtrack is superb.

+1 from me also. It's a very understated performance, but gripping. There was an economy to the overall that really made it special. Also Carey Mulligan is extremely cute.

Just watched 'Tree of Life'. Visually fantastic (there's a mesmeric sequence all about the creation of the universe), and a wonderful encapsulation of the inquisitiveness of childhood, but it never really qualifies the necessity for the modern day sequences with Sean Penn from what I could see. Perhaps it's in there, but I just couldn't see the existential crisis that was making him reflect upon his early childhood. Still, beautiful and moving.

Similar
02-10-2011, 11:32 PM
Just watched 'Tree of Life'. Visually fantastic (there's a mesmeric sequence all about the creation of the universe), and a wonderful encapsulation of the inquisitiveness of childhood, but it never really qualifies the necessity for the modern day sequences with Sean Penn from what I could see. Perhaps it's in there, but I just couldn't see the existential crisis that was making him reflect upon his early childhood. Still, beautiful and moving.
From what I've read, neither could Penn. He isn't very happy with the way the movie turned out.
I must admit I didn't have the patience to watch it through.

Kadayi
03-10-2011, 12:47 AM
From what I've read, neither could Penn. He isn't very happy with the way the movie turned out.
I must admit I didn't have the patience to watch it through.

I had a look around and spotted a mention of this on the guardian. I have to say it's quite refreshing for an actor to be that honest (I can't say I'm the biggest Sean Penn fan tbh, though he was good in 21 Grams). But you don't get any sense of the contextual relationship between the past and the present (why in his daydreams/dreams he's drawn to this specific period) and its kind of frustrating really given it's not clarified in some form.

TailSwallower
03-10-2011, 02:41 AM
Watched Little Shop of Horrors last night - the Frank Oz one (because I think there's an older one too?). I don't think I'd seen it since I was a kid, but my girlfriend had been randomly quoting it the last couple of weeks, so we finally got around to watching it.

It was good all-round, but the scene with Bill Murray was (unsurprisingly) fantastic. Love that man.

Similar
03-10-2011, 10:14 AM
I had a look around and spotted a mention of this on the guardian. I have to say it's quite refreshing for an actor to be that honest [...]
Agreed.


But you don't get any sense of the contextual relationship between the past and the present (why in his daydreams/dreams he's drawn to this specific period) and its kind of frustrating really given it's not clarified in some form.
yeah. I felt the movie was too much about seeming deep and moody, but they kind of forgot to tie things together, which was also why I lost interest (granted, I have too much stuff to deal with right now, so I don't have a lot of patience).

Xercies
03-10-2011, 04:47 PM
I think to enjoy The Tree Of Life you kind of have to make it in your mind that this is a more poetic piece of work then a strictly narrative one. Some people might like that, but others might be turned off by it...

Rii
06-10-2011, 08:11 AM
Amadeus

Not sure what I ever saw in this film, other than Elizabeth Berridge's breasts that is. It's turgid.

DarkNoghri
06-10-2011, 08:38 AM
Watched Drive. I was blown away, its much better than I expected. Now I see why it's got such a buzz. Great direction, amazing style, Gosling exudes McQueen cool and the soundtrack is superb.

I saw that the other day with a friend of mine, because I had heard great things about it. It was nicely shot, but the movie was slow (as my friend put it, it was a one hour movie stretched into two hours). The main character spent most of the movie hovering somewhere between creepy and awkward; he has nothing on McQueen, at all. When he wasn't a creeper (seriously, that smile is so very awkward), he was a psycho. For a movie about a wheelman, there was a surprisingly small amount of wheelmanning.

And according to my mechanic friend, his fancy gauges on the dashboard weren't even connected half the time. I just don't see why it's getting all the glowing reviews I'm seeing.

Xercies
06-10-2011, 11:56 AM
Amadeus

Not sure what I ever saw in this film, other than Elizabeth Berridge's breasts that is. It's turgid.

Did you see the original or the directors cut? I've heard that the directors cut definitely puts in a bit to much stuff that doesn't really fit and makes the film a lot worse and boring. I quite liked the film but I thought the same thing after watching the directors cut.

Rii
06-10-2011, 02:26 PM
Did you see the original or the directors cut? I've heard that the directors cut definitely puts in a bit to much stuff that doesn't really fit and makes the film a lot worse and boring. I quite liked the film but I thought the same thing after watching the directors cut.

The Director's Cut. I can well imagine the theatrical cut being less actually painful, but not that it could elevate the film beyond mediocrity and justify its continued place in my collection.

[Wot is happening is that my DVD bookshelf is full and so I'm making room by revisiting films that I (1) haven't watched in aeons and (2) aren't sure would pass the inspection of my contemporary self. So far the score is 2 passes with reservations (Schindler's List and Jerry Maguire, the last by the skin of its teeth) and 1 fail - Amadeus. Several Kubrick films to go under the knife shortly!]

UPDATE: Full Metal Jacket - Fail

BobsLawnService
09-10-2011, 10:09 PM
The Expendables - it kicks the asses of roughly 100% of the comic book trash that has been released over the last 15 years. Great, mindless, steroid and testoserone fueled 'splosions and assorted ass kickery. One thing was a bit odd and that was Mickey Rourkes monologues - it stands out simply for being the best sliver of acting I've seen in a while. Seriously.

I think I've been missing the 80's action film aesthetic more than I realised.

sendmark
09-10-2011, 10:28 PM
Today my eyeballs witnessed:

Midnight in Paris -really good, warm and funny. Classic Woody.

Tucker and Dales vs Evil - parody of the hillbilly horror genre which worked well. Some good laughs in it and nods to the classics.

Similar
09-10-2011, 11:53 PM
The Expendables - it kicks the asses of roughly 100% of the comic book trash that has been released over the last 15 years. Great, mindless, steroid and testoserone fueled 'splosions and assorted ass kickery. One thing was a bit odd and that was Mickey Rourkes monologues - it stands out simply for being the best sliver of acting I've seen in a while. Seriously.
I enjoyed that one too, which surprised me a bit, but it takes itself seriously enough to dare to invest something and not so seriously that it becomes a parody (unlike the last Rambo movie, to take one example).


I just watched Bunraku (2010). It was quite enjoyable too. It doesn't always work, but it mostly does. Not quite convinced by Ron Perlman's hairstyle, though.

Xercies
15-10-2011, 01:09 PM
The City Of Lost Children - Well that was visually interesting at least, didn't really get what was going on, I think it was a bit to oblique for its own good, throwing charaters and plot in there. Unfortunately I did watch the dub version which is kind of bad also it has a problem where I cannot understand half the things people are saying because there very garbled. Subtiltes could have been a lot better. There was some really good bits in it, The style of it is fantastic and the idea is quite novel. The main "badguys" are really very interesting especially Mr Baldy who I don't know why but loved every minute he was on screen. Maybe I might appreciate this movie on extra watching.

Alex Bakke
15-10-2011, 05:19 PM
UPDATE: Full Metal Jacket - Fail


Whaaaaaaaaaaaat.

Drake Sigar
15-10-2011, 06:53 PM
The Expendables - it kicks the asses of roughly 100% of the comic book trash that has been released over the last 15 years. Great, mindless, steroid and testoserone fueled 'splosions and assorted ass kickery. One thing was a bit odd and that was Mickey Rourkes monologues - it stands out simply for being the best sliver of acting I've seen in a while. Seriously.

I think I've been missing the 80's action film aesthetic more than I realised.
I liked Expendables primarily because it knows it’s a popcorn flick and has a runtime to reflect that. But on the whole it’s largely forgettable, with very few ‘80s’ moments to commemorate the gathering of a classic action star dream team.

Alex Bakke
15-10-2011, 07:07 PM
I liked Expendables primarily because it knows it’s a popcorn flick and has a runtime to reflect that. But on the whole it’s largely forgettable, with very few ‘80s’ moments to commemorate the gathering of a classic action star dream team.

I'm hoping that The Expendables 2 will be even better.

DigitalSignalX
15-10-2011, 10:08 PM
Watched the full version of Leon - loved it. The extra scenes add a superb depth to both characters.

Driver on the other hand, I was not impressed. The writing was just... vacant. Gosling's deadpan performance didn't strike me as brilliant, it struck me as wooden and shallow. The cars had more character.

I followed up with another Luc Besson flick, From Paris with Love. Not a bad romp, Travolta manages to sell the off-the-rails agent despite a rather crappy babe in the woods style partnering with Jonathan Meyers.

Xercies
16-10-2011, 10:37 AM
I really did not like The Expendables, it was so...dull. And i don't think a what's supposed to be a throwback to the 80s action movies should be that dull.

Rii
19-10-2011, 05:09 AM
Home

So preachy it's irritating even for those who already share its ideology -- which goes beyond standard environmentalism to the more teleological fringe of the Gaia hypothesis -- but the footage more than makes up for it. Definitely one to see in Blu-Ray 1080p. The entire doco can be viewed (legally) on Youtube (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jqxENMKaeCU), albeit only in 720p.

desvergeh
19-10-2011, 12:58 PM
The City Of Lost Children - Well that was visually interesting at least, didn't really get what was going on, I think it was a bit to oblique for its own good, throwing charaters and plot in there. Unfortunately I did watch the dub version which is kind of bad also it has a problem where I cannot understand half the things people are saying because there very garbled. Subtiltes could have been a lot better. There was some really good bits in it, The style of it is fantastic and the idea is quite novel. The main "badguys" are really very interesting especially Mr Baldy who I don't know why but loved every minute he was on screen. Maybe I might appreciate this movie on extra watching.

Hooked out my own dvd of this to watch the other night. To my absolute horror I discovered it was dubbed, with no options for subtitles!

Still a good film, but the dubbing is truly awful. Re-watch it subtitled if you can.

You seen Delicatessan? Same directors/writers. Very good, similar feel to City.

Also agree with you on Expendables. Despite a couple of high-lights I found it to be very disappointing overall. Actually preferred the A-Team remake, mainly due to Sharlto Copley.

Xercies
19-10-2011, 05:28 PM
Captain America - Fun and entertaining, so very good pulp WW2 action hero film, made by the same director of The Rocketeer and really he should be making more films like this. He is very good at it. Everyone does the job very well, Hugo Weaving is really great as the villain and of course Tommy Lee Jones is awesome. Captain America is done very well, the story is very interesting and fun and it zips on at a nice speed. The technology they use is awesome 30s style(I've always loved that era to be honet) and definitely recommended. Can't wait for The Avengers.


You seen Delicatessan?

Yes I have and I much prefered that one, it had a really decent story to the really great style it had. I think I will watch a few more things from this directore. I know he made Mic Macs, but I also think he did Amalie.

fanatic4k
21-10-2011, 05:27 AM
I'm re-watching the Lord of the Rings trilogy (uncut version) and enjoying Harry Potter series lol. They're all epic hits!

DigitalSignalX
23-10-2011, 02:12 AM
Watched Super 8 tonight, and really enjoyed it. I can't help thinking it's like E.T., Close Encounters, and The Goonies all rolled into one with a little more suspense/violence. The superb "play trailer" bonus content from Portal 2 worked better then any film clip for etching into the brain that I wanted to see this film, and the actual train crash scene really delivers on what we experienced in the demo.

Characters were ok, with some classic 70's tropes represented accordingly, but Abrams and Spielberg managed to pull it off without being over the top. I couldn't help but have a huge grin on my face most of the way through this, partly because I grew up in that era and partly because it's just a solid movie.

Be sure to stay through the credits, the amateur zombie film submission the kids were making gets played and is a hilarious nod toward both John Romero and Spielberg's own youth making films in his back yard.

Xercies
23-10-2011, 10:23 AM
The Girl Who Played With Fire - That was decent enough, still a bit of a slow paced thriller with pretty pictures unfortunately the actual case this time i don't think was as thrilling as the last movie and the pictures weren't as pretty. Pretty solid stuff, it is basically a nicer made version of all those crime dramas you see on the television just with a few feminist issues here and there. The actors are still pretty good with their roles. One of the villains is a little silly though, a big Aryan German dude that can't stand pain and is also connected to the girl character. That just goes in a bit of a silly direction. Also I'm surprised, it didn't really touch on that much the whole Eastern European sex slave thing, it was a very vague background why they were doing it but it never really came to the forefront, it might have been a bit more depressing but I would have liked the film to delve a bit more into it. All in all a solid film really.

DigitalSignalX
24-10-2011, 03:16 AM
The Girl Who Played With Fire

I'm curious how the English remakes will do, loved the Swedish and Noomi Rapace will be a tough act to follow. The books are superb and stand up well in any language.

cjlr
10-11-2011, 02:09 AM
I'm no war film expert either but I have a few recommendations:

Come and See - a rare look at WW2 from the Soviet civilian side. It is by far the most horrific war film I've seen and it's not because it's graphic (although it certainly doesn't shy away from anything) but because it feels both raw and real, and like a feverish nightmare

I watched that damn movie because of you bastards and now I feel like I should curl into a ball and die. Thanks a lot.

DigitalSignalX
10-11-2011, 04:10 AM
Picked up Judas Kiss (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0138541/) this weekend and was pleasantly surprised. Alan Rickman, Emma Thompson and the always super sexy Carla Gugino pull off a decent buddy cop style kidnapping-double cross mystery that was very enjoyable. Some great lines, including this gem:

Sadie Hawkins:- Let's get it out of the way then: you've never worked under a female superior before. I got to where I am by pushing paper and playing nice - I've never actually fired a gun before, I'm only in this job to prove to my father I'm not a coward. I give decent head, so I got promoted before all the worthy candidates, all of them men, all of them equally gifted at fellatio but there was a gender quota to fill. I'm also stupid and idealistic; you are hard and cynical, and usually right. I am secretly in love with you but I have a hard time showing it. Did I skip anything?

Dave Friedman:- You're a better driver than me, but I'm too proud to admit it.

Rii
16-11-2011, 06:16 PM
Another doco, "We", about the speakings of Arundhati Roy. I've read some of her writings before - and just ordered her latest essay compilation 'The Shape of the Beast' - but remarkably until now I had yet to actually hear her speak. Her voice is remarkable in so many ways I don't have words for. There's not much to say about the zero-budget presentation save for the excellent music selection, the focus here is definitely on her words themselves. The trailer provides a decent taste of the experience:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=chVD8NprL3E&f


The Girl Who Played With Fire - That was decent enough, still a bit of a slow paced thriller with pretty pictures unfortunately the actual case this time i don't think was as thrilling as the last movie and the pictures weren't as pretty.

Yeah they changed directors and it shows. The second and third films are certainly inferior to the first, but still worth watching I think, if only on account of Noomi Rapace's superlative ongoing performance as Lisbeth Salander.

LaunchJC
16-11-2011, 06:41 PM
Let The Right One In - (The swedish one), really enjoyed it, appreciated the fact gore was a little less out in front then most films, definitely better that way when it comes to vampires. A lot left up to interpretation too which is always nice. The boy looked like a young Jimmy Saville mind.

Xercies
17-11-2011, 09:49 AM
Wall-E- I love this film, I watched it on Blu-Ray and it just looks fantastic. It always gives me a warm heart at the end, its a perfect love story I have to say. The opening is absolutely awesome with pretty much no speech uttered and just the story is told with background elements and the characters animation. This is why I do 3D animation and it made me want to work more on my project. Also very good reference for my dissertation

Jockie
18-11-2011, 09:33 PM
Watched a film called Stakeland on a recommendation from a friend, went in with pretty low expectations as it's a no-budget no stars Post-apocalyptic Zombie/Vampire hybrid, and well... it's certainly a damn sight better than I Am Legend.

I think it's possible the cinematography and direction elevate it above the script and performances, but the central male characters had a nicely understated surrogate father/son relationship. The guy playing the evil neo-Nazi was kind of awful though. Still I'd say it's definately worth a watch.

DaftPunk
26-11-2011, 04:58 PM
The Thing 2011,didn't liked it at all and that CGI looked bad.

sabrage
26-11-2011, 08:08 PM
I'm not watching anything, because every time I look at Netflix Watch Instantly I feel a lot like I do about my Steam library. My queue is filled with movies I "want to watch but not right now" and they seem to permanantly be in that state. Can anyone recommend something obscure? I feel like I've seen everything good and I can only re-watch 13 Assassins so many times.

DigitalSignalX
26-11-2011, 08:30 PM
I currently have 50/50, Cowboys and Aliens, Immortals, On the Inside, My own Love Song, The Guard, and Our Idiot Brother queued up, but can't be bothered to watch any of them. I'm likely to start with My Own Love Song (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1193507/), because Forest Whitaker is amazing.

Xercies
27-11-2011, 09:29 AM
The Girl Who Kicked The Hornets Nest - I didn't really think this film was that neccesary, the second one ended on a good point and i wouldn't of minded that to be the finale. Anyway this is kind of a bit of a even duller thriller then the others. It goes very slow, it doesn't have the edge like the other two movies. It does go into a lot of the back story of Lisbeth though most of it is kind of repeating itself from the second movie. All in all I think I would give this one a miss to be honest.

DaftPunk
27-11-2011, 11:05 AM
Watched REC2 and Pontypool (canadian zombie flick),both were good movies.

An Anonymous Source
29-11-2011, 10:57 AM
I watched Drive and feel rather torn about it. It's my first Refn film and while I definitely appreciated its technical aspects I didn't love it or liked it.

The cinematography was in general extremely well done and beautiful without feeling like it was showing off, except for two distinct scenes where it made sense, and the editing was masterful in the way it build up the tension. It was also refreshing to have chase scenes where you could understand what the hell happened. I thought all the actors did a good job (Refn also effectively builds up the eponymous driver into more of an icon than a character), and some of the characterisation was deft. The violence was surprisingly gory, and that too felt welcome.

Yet I never managed to care or feel much for the characters past the first half of the film. I felt very much on the outside, politely watching some wonderfully crafted but cold and heartless contraption. Never mind the plot to this point had enough interesting slight twists on worn tropes (e.g. when the husbands comes back home, a lesser film would have depicted him as an asshole), but devolved straight into your usual "crime doesn't pay" and "money will destroy everyone" stuff you see in pretty much every gangster flick.

It wasn't an unpleasant experience -and I should say I didn't dislike it per se- but I guess at the end of it I just lost interest; the biggest flaw a film can have. Still, it was technically brilliant enough and displayed a lot of good ideas beyond the directing to make me interested in the rest of Refn's output.

Drake Sigar
03-12-2011, 09:07 AM
Sophiaaaaaaa!

Oh sorry, I was just watching episode 7 of Walking Dead. Seems it's on break till January now.

Juan Carlo
04-12-2011, 01:50 AM
This year has sucked so far for movies. The only ones I've seen that I liked were:

Drive (awesome. It's like Tarantino, only with no dialogue. So, I guess, now that I think about it, that means it's like an American Beat Takashi movie?)
Melancholia (Von Trier's best since "Breaking the Waves")
Attack the Block

That's it. Those are the only movies I've seen so far this year that I would say are essential viewing.

Juan Carlo
04-12-2011, 01:52 AM
Watched REC2 and Pontypool (canadian zombie flick),both were good movies.

I hated REC2 soooo much. Although, I really, really, loved REC.

Pontypool's pretty good, though.

Universal Hamster
05-12-2011, 05:14 PM
The Thing (2011)

What the FUCK was that shit? Almost completely dire and made by people who obviously read a plot synopsis of the Carpenter classic, but didn't deign to actually watch it.
The only positive was Mary Elizabeth Winstead, who, if in a better film I think could play a good tough female lead a la Sigourney Weaver.

BobsLawnService
29-12-2011, 08:10 PM
Crazy, Stupid, Love.

What a pleasant surprise. I've been looking for a romantic comedy to watch with the missus that doesn't revolve around shrill neurotic female love interests and annoying manchild male love interests.

What we have here is charismatic, likeable people making stupid mistakes but ultimately getting past them in a slighly off-formula manner. I thought the ending was a little forces but it left me and the missus feeling content and fuzzy which is the point of snuggling on the couch together watching a romantic comedy.

Also, Emma Stone, Julianne Moore and Ryan Gosling's obscenely chistled abs.

The JG Man
29-12-2011, 11:28 PM
Just watched Sudden Impact, the fourth of the Dirty Harry films. Thought it was pretty damn good and kept a better pace than Dirty Harry itself, even if that is more iconic. Definitely stronger than the second and third films, although they're all cracking.

Kaira-
30-12-2011, 12:58 AM
Just watched Session 9. Not sure what to think about it, or to be more precise, how to interpret it. I liked the movie, with little subtle mind screws and making it look like it's pointing fingers. However, I am left wondering if the other workers were a symptom of Gordon's splitted mind, or if Simon is some supernatural being which possessed Gordon after his... incident with his wife and family, or if Simon is the only other personality of Gordon which drove him to his actions at the asylum. The more I think about it, the more confused I become.

Voon
30-12-2011, 12:49 PM
Watched The Aviator a few days ago after watching most of the mediocre and terribad movie releases this year. I thought it was a bit too dramatic in a few scenes in the film but overall, it's brilliant. Haven't watched much Scorsese films to say it was one of, if not the best film he made, though.

Also, I watched the new Tintin movie weeks ago. A bit disappointing in terms of storyline but visually impressive even when compared to Zemekis films in terms of animation.

DigitalSignalX
31-12-2011, 10:08 PM
Watched via magical internets the BBC remake of the Borrowers (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1975269). Very cute bit of Christmas cheer, and it was nice to see Stephen Fry and Doctor Eccleston still pull off some good scenes. I had trouble with some of the colloquialisms but that's foreign television for ya.

Perfect Sense (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1439572) with Ewan McGregor was surprisingly uplifting despite the actual plot, but taken out of context as more of a stage of life analysis - I found it quite inspirational. Also the score was *really* good.

Pseudo310
03-01-2012, 06:10 PM
Watching some old horror movies. I'm a huge horror fan but have always steered clear of the classics. Frankenstein was a chore even though it was only an hour long, but I'm excited about watching The Horror of Dracula​ with Lee and Cushing. I've never watched the old Hammer films, and it's about time.

Xercies
03-01-2012, 07:48 PM
The Adjustment Bureau - A really good romance film with a kind of quite cool sci-fi twist and a little bit of action towards it. It deals with Two couples finding each other throughout the years and the guy realising that they are not meant to be together because the people who control peoples destinies do not want them to be together. Matt Deamon is really good in it, and the couple do feel very realistic and close. Even though they do some romance cliches(like the couple breaking up before getting back together) it doesn't it in an interesting sci-fi way that it doesn't feel to bad. All in all I definitly recommend it. Oh and its nothing like Inception really.

Berzee
03-01-2012, 10:28 PM
The 6-hour-long 6-cassette-BBC-series version Pride and Prejudice! It is as funny as I remember the book being, so that's a grand thing. =)

1, perhaps 2, cassettes a night. We will see.

Xercies
04-01-2012, 11:27 AM
Submarine - A really great deadpanish style of comedy, its a kind of slice of life about a teenager living in Swansea in the 80s trying to get a girlfriend and trying to stop his parents falling apart. I found it really funny, and it reminded me a lot of when i was a teenager. The main character is a bit odd but likeble and the people around him are the same. all in all definitely recommended and I will be interested to what Richard Ayoade makes next.

mrpier
04-01-2012, 01:09 PM
Drive - Stylish and brutal, one of the better movies I saw last year.

Moneyball - Unexpectedly good movie about something I don't care about (Baseball/Statistics in baseball).

Stake Land - Good vampire/horror movie, although it feels more like a zombie movie.

acenck
04-01-2012, 01:09 PM
The Last Films I watched:
Limitless: I found it to be interesting.
The Next Three Days: entertaining.

Xercies
05-01-2012, 11:08 AM
Solaris - I have no idea what the hell this was about, and it seemed the director was making sure of that fact. 5 minutes of just a car driving with creepy music, random bits in black and white for no apprant reason. A story and twist that makes you go "WTF?" The only good thing I can say about this is that it definitely gives you a kind of lonely and creepy atmosphere throughout the ship parts. and despite it being 3 hours long and not having a clue what it was about it didn't really bore me. Anyway I think Stalker is probably better because i could kind of understand that, not fully but I like understanding it a bit and then going deeper then understanding it a little.

DigitalSignalX
06-01-2012, 03:07 AM
Real Steel (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0433035/) last night. The first couple of minutes of the film is a shot of a truck driving through some farms of wind turbines, and all I could think of thanks to Anno 2070 is how bad their efficiency would be due to proximity to each other. Sigh. Decent feel-good movie, and great CGI effects. Hugh Jackman basically phones it in, but it's good enough for a Disney film. The plot and the science of it all doesn't stand up to even the slightest bit of scrutiny, so if you can get past it, it delivers for what it is - a "alienated kid and his dad" movie.

Voon
08-01-2012, 11:34 AM
Ooh, I like Real Steel. Yeah, being a Disney movie and all, its decent and G-rated enough (with a few exceptions) to watch. But if it wasn't, I think, it has a lot more potential to be a much better movie. I love the boxing there.

The JG Man
14-01-2012, 12:04 AM
Had a "Films Someone Hasn't Watched" day with some friends. Only got through two:
1. Gentlemen Prefer Blondes
Thought it was good. Not really my thing and we did talk a fair bit over it, but I enjoyed it enough. I'd never actively go out of my way to watch it, but it wasn't bad.
2. Zoolander
Holds up on repeated viewing. Very funny, very clever film that completely takes the piss out of the fashion industry. Well worth a watch.

We also watched The Incredibles, after someone in our group left, for no real reason. I will defend my proclamation of it being the best Pixar film. Damn near everything about it is perfect.

LaunchJC
14-01-2012, 12:13 AM
We also watched The Incredibles, after someone in our group left, for no real reason. I will defend my proclamation of it being the best Pixar film. Damn near everything about it is perfect.

Monsters, Inc is better.

On that subject I watched Ratatouille recently, the only Pixar film (other than Cars) which I had little interest in watching, and enjoyed it a lot.

BobsLawnService
15-01-2012, 06:57 PM
A Girl Walks Into A Bar

Worst film of the decade so far. Starts out lame, whatever little story there is fizzles out completely about half way through and the dialogue is just one pointless non-sequitur after another. It is like whoever wrote it was trying to be a cross between Tarantina and Kevin Smith but they just miss the mark completely.

Best avoided.

The JG Man
15-01-2012, 07:07 PM
Monsters, Inc is better. On that subject I watched Ratatouille recently, the only Pixar film (other than Cars) which I had little interest in watching, and enjoyed it a lot.

I wouldn't say the film bored me, but I found it hard to keep entirely interested in it. It was good, but not the great I expected from Pixar. I feel exactly the same as you do though about Ratatouille.

Voon
16-01-2012, 03:33 PM
I wouldn't say the film bored me, but I found it hard to keep entirely interested in it. It was good, but not the great I expected from Pixar. I feel exactly the same as you do though about Ratatouille.

Same here about Rattatouille. Loved the movie despite keeping my expectations low watching it. Brad Bird's a genius

DigitalSignalX
16-01-2012, 04:11 PM
Watched "War Horse (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1568911/)" last night, and was not impressed. Basically a fanciful (read: make believe) Disney movie set in WWI. I was OK with this "boy and his horse" film all the way up to the point Spielberg depicted a cavalry charge toward 3-4 machine gun emplacements and then showed only the horses streaming past - as if to imply the futility of mounted warfare vs. the new age of the automatic weapon was the ease at which they could be picked off their horses in a Hollywood ASPCA appropriate manner rather then slaughtered en masse.
It went downhill from there, with the only authentic scene standing out for the whole film was of two deserters getting caught and punished against the backdrop of a windmill (which leads us directly to, oh yes thanks Disney, a night-gown clad adolescent girl prancing around in the middle of the entire Reich army). If this film hadn't been set in WWI, it wouldn't have felt so patronizing, sort of like a angsty teen love story set in the middle of a Warsaw ghetto where the presence of the Holocaust is supposed to be incidental.

How Spielberg expected to convey the reality of war and the incredibly un-reality of this plot at the same baffles me.

Similar
16-01-2012, 05:43 PM
Screamers: The Hunting (2009). Sequel to Screamers (1995) which I have soft spot for. Not as bad as I expected, but very predictable all the way through (except perhaps for the weirdly unprovoked love scene) and not terribly well written.
Not quite sure why Lance Henriksen was in it.

Immortals (2011). The trailer made me think this would be utterly horrible. It's not, but it's not very good either. Something just seems off all the way through. And the scene in the beginning where the main character is chopping wood and the wise old man says something about how good he is with an axe annoyed me; he clearly doesn't have the faintest idea about how to chop wood with an axe.

13th Warrior (1999). Watched this for the nth time and I still find it rather charming. Also about the only Banderas movie I like.

Wooly Wugga Wugga
16-01-2012, 06:46 PM
Screamers: The Hunting (2009). Sequel to Screamers (1995) which I have soft spot for. Not as bad as I expected, but very predictable all the way through (except perhaps for the weirdly unprovoked love scene) and not terribly well written.
Not quite sure why Lance Henriksen was in it.

Thanks for reminding me about Screamers. I remember thoroughly enjoying it just after it came out and I'd completely forgotten about it. I must hunt it down.

LaunchJC
16-01-2012, 07:38 PM
13th Warrior (1999). Watched this for the nth time and I still find it rather charming. Also about the only Banderas movie I like.

Such an odd film, I'll watch everytime it's on tv, it definitely has something about it which makes it entertaining/fun.

Similar
17-01-2012, 12:14 AM
Thanks for reminding me about Screamers. I remember thoroughly enjoying it just after it came out and I'd completely forgotten about it. I must hunt it down.
I just watched it again. I think it holds up pretty well. It does feel a bit outdated, but not bad enough to really matter (the sequel feels more outdated, I think). And Peter Weller always has something.

jasons
23-01-2012, 06:35 AM
Just watched sherlock Holmes 2 movie but this one is not as good as The first part of sherlock Holmes series

squirrel
23-01-2012, 08:52 AM
When a Man Loves a Woman, starred by Andy Garcia and Meg Ryan. It's not a new movie, and I dont exactly recall which year it's out.

I am a big fan of Meg Ryan. She is very beautiful when she's young. I think that now she mainly stars comedies.

Unlike the title suggests, to me it's not exactly a romance film. It's a film addressing drinking problem. Andy Garcia acted as a flight captain, with a wife starred by Meg who remarried her and brought with her a daughter, and gave birth to a younger sister for Andy. Problem is, that Meg has a drinking problem. At first Andy didnt care much, he loved her anyway. But the problem is getting more and more serious that Andy could no longer ignore. This film is a story about how the couple worked together to resolve this family crisis.

Similar
23-01-2012, 02:11 PM
Battle of the Bulge (1965) on TV. Wrong tanks (the Germans have Pershings, etc.), wrong terrain, wrong tactics. They even managed to get the season wrong. The story is a weird mess too.
Not highly recommended.

Centurion40
23-01-2012, 02:21 PM
Just watched sherlock Holmes 2 movie but this one is not as good as The first part of sherlock Holmes series

Agreed. Still, it didn't suck.

Centurion40
23-01-2012, 02:22 PM
Just saw Haywire. I kinda enjoyed it. Especially once I learned that the lead has NEVER starred in a major motion pic. She really pulled it off, not that she was performing Shakespeare.

Voon
26-01-2012, 02:48 PM
Pirates of Sillicon Valley

Made-for-television flick, sure, but its quite good. It also seems to focus a lot, i mean, a lot on the late Steve Jobs rather than Bill Gates, though.

Xercies
26-01-2012, 06:20 PM
Attack The Block- A very fun and quite funny film abut a gang of youths having to defend their apartment block from aliens. I quite like that at the start these kids are on the bad side but throughout the film you start liking them a lot more and are invested into their struggle. Its not to scary and its not to funny but it is very enjoyable and it makes you want to keep watching since it is very exciting and some characters are very enjoyable. I also like the fact that it doesn't totally give you a big scene where you find out why the kids are the way they are its just subtly added to throughout the movie so you get an idea of why it is which I think is definitely a lot better. You can choose to like them or hate them still at the end without the director forcing his opinion on you. Anyway definitely recommended and i'll be interested to what the guy does next.

sabrage
26-01-2012, 06:22 PM
Attack The Block
Attack the Block was my second favorite 2011 film, after 13 Assassins. Great movie.

Kadayi
05-02-2012, 10:54 AM
Watched Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy. Really impressed by it overall. The director Tomas Alfredson (who also directed 'Let the right one in') is a has a knack for visual storytelling (in a similar manner to Nicolas Winding Refn) and he does a brilliant job of putting across a lot of the important plot events and mood without a great deal of recourse to expositional dialogue. I'm surprised that it's not been at least a nominated for best picture tbh. Great performances as well across the board.

Alex Bakke
07-02-2012, 01:14 AM
Drive. Oh my.

The Innocent
07-02-2012, 03:08 AM
Watched Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy. Really impressed by it overall. The director Tomas Alfredson (who also directed 'Let the right one in') is a has a knack for visual storytelling (in a similar manner to Nicolas Winding Refn) and he does a brilliant job of putting across a lot of the important plot events and mood without a great deal of recourse to expositional dialogue. I'm surprised that it's not been at least a nominated for best picture tbh. Great performances as well across the board.

Exactly this. A number of the scenes were staggering in how well they conveyed the paranoia of the time, but they never veered into showmanship. I was worried that the film wouldn't be able to compress the novel into its two hours' running time, but it did a fine job of it. And I thought Oldman did a superb job of portraying a man with just the right level of detachment from some of the heartbreaking decisions he had to make.

Also recently saw Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows and liked it more than the first, actually. It wasn't as fresh (and I missed Rachel McAdams), but it was so much more fun this time around, and the villain was a lot more interesting. I loved how understated Jared Harris' performance as Moriarty was. Simply chilling.

Finally, yesterday we saw Chronicle. I didn't expect much going in, but I thought the performances were great. The script a touch less great (and I wasn't a fan of the end very much), but it was still a pleasant surprise.


Drive. Oh my.

Do tell.

Xercies
07-02-2012, 09:32 AM
Also recently saw Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows and liked it more than the first, actually. It wasn't as fresh (and I missed Rachel McAdams), but it was so much more fun this time around, and the villain was a lot more interesting. I loved how understated Jared Harris' performance as Moriarty was. Simply chilling.

I watched this and really liked it but Guy Ritchie has to do something about the length it really went on to long! But it was a very enjoyable movie and i did love all the characters. It also made me miss Stephen Fry as a comic actor because I did forget how good he was at that. I also kind of like this version of Watson a lot more then the TV show, he is a lot more Sherlock's equal in the film.

Lilliput King
07-02-2012, 10:45 AM
What did you guys think of that scene where Downey Jr and pals were being chased through the forest and Ritchie went totally nuts with the camera?

I enjoyed the film overall but what was he thinking.

The Innocent
07-02-2012, 06:58 PM
I watched this and really liked it but Guy Ritchie has to do something about the length it really went on to long!

I quite liked the length. Any less and I wouldn't have been so impressed with Moriarty. I can see what you mean, but I was having such a good time that I didn't want it to end. And I definitely agree on Watson—this is easily the most interesting (and useful) version of that character I've seen to date.


What did you guys think of that scene where Downey Jr and pals were being chased through the forest and Ritchie went totally nuts with the camera?

I enjoyed the film overall but what was he thinking.

It was a bit much. Though it did succeed in making me all kinds of tense at the time.

The JG Man
11-02-2012, 03:57 AM
The Muppets as it just came out today in the UK (damn you Americans!).

It's fantastic and you should all go and see it if you've ever liked them. I had a great big grin on my face all the way through: the songs were fun and usually up-beat without being annoying; the simplicity of the plot wasn't an issue due to the film's incredible (and personally unexpected) complete awareness of the fact that it's a film, something numerous characters make reference to multiple times; and the comedy is pretty good. On the last point, it's not even as if some of the jokes are amazingly clever, but they're just great to laugh along to. Some are clever and there are some blink-and-you'll-miss'em ones thrown in there too. It's a good all-round package that doesn't out-say its welcome.

Definitely a 'fun for all the family, whatever their (and your) ages' thing. They get a good few 'adult' things in there too under the radar. The main thing is that it was fun and well worth the price of admission.

arfmaster
13-02-2012, 07:50 AM
Just watched.again: SAW I - VII >:)

Anthile
13-02-2012, 10:53 AM
Watched Kill List (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1788391/) earlier. What. The. Hell. Brilliant, though.

Xercies
13-02-2012, 12:16 PM
The Human Centipede 2 - Avoid. But you knew that already. Ergh this film is a boring slog and well its just for the shock moments at the end which are uncessary. The only saving grace is that there are moments in it either intentional or not where it kind of becomes a black comedy which did make me laugh. I liked the first one which was more atmospheric and the villian was better. So see that one if you really want to see one.

Theblazeuk
14-02-2012, 11:45 AM
Watched Kill List (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1788391/) earlier. What. The. Hell. Brilliant, though.

Had that in waiting for a while... think I'll finally give it a go tonight.

Watched Chronicle when it first came out, I really enjoyed it. So much better than I expected and I think the final scenes (which some people seemed to dislike) were some of the best depictions of the sheer chaos superpowered destruction would really cause. It's like if a tank just popped up in the middle of a city and started shelling buildings. A tank that could fly.

In fact I think it's possibly the best depiction of superpowers, as opposed to superheroics, so far. I could even get onboard with the found-footage premise, though it's not worth thinking about how footage from other cameras (and CCTV footage) could end up in the same 'edit' in any detail. It's just a framing device and a useful symbol in the end.