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View Full Version : EA Origin privacy intrusion. Where do you stand ?



Lobotomist
07-11-2011, 04:28 PM
Lets get one thing straight Origin performs privacy intrusion on users PC.

No mater where you stand. This was proven and tested. By numerous sources on internet.

Quote: This video shows how Origin is scanning folders including folders containing medical data - in this case a special software for diabetes. The software is used by diabetics to log sugar levels and other medical data.
Origin scans the folders and especially reads file attributes like when a file was created and when it has been changed the last time. While the software probably does not read the contents of the files - according to the EULA it will transmit information about the installed software to EA.


Now. Before the discussion derails on fake reports and sources of information.
Just open Process Explorer and see for yourself what folders and files are being accessed.

EA also asks you to sign EULA in which you are informed that all collected information will be sent to EA and that they will have permission to do everything they deem fitting , including provide this information to authorities.


Basically you are agreeing that EA will now know what programs you have installed on your PC.
How often and when you use them.

This might not be a big deal. Except from EA now having power to identify exact locations and quantities of pirated software on thousands PCs. I guess there will be not much malicious use.
Perhaps only very targeted marketing.


But the question is. How far are we willing to bend?

By giving in and installing Origin. You agree on Spyware being installed on your PC.
And than every other software publisher will have excuse of precedent. (It was done before , so it becomes accepted practice)


I myself. Dont really care for scanning. (except for it being system hog)
And I dont care for legal repercussions (Since i live in a country that EA dont give s**t about)

But I just can not in my best conciseness condone this.

I really want to play BF3. I am great fan and have been waiting for this game so long.
But now I am simply waiting if EA decides to change Origin Eula. Or I will simply not buy it.
(same goes for SWTOR unfortunately)


How do you guys feel about this ?

duff
07-11-2011, 04:29 PM
No mater where you stand. This was proven and tested. By numerous sources on internet.



No, it really hasn't been proven at all.

Lobotomist
07-11-2011, 04:41 PM
No, it really hasn't been proven at all.

I also believe only what I see with my own eyes.

Just install Process Explorer , open it , select Origin, and see for yourself what folders and files are being accessed.

Taidan
07-11-2011, 04:43 PM
Zero tolerance from me. That EA see fit to look at even just the names of files on my hard-drives that have nothing to do with them is a complete violation of privacy.

If a game needs Origin to run, then I won't be buying it.

Vexing Vision
07-11-2011, 04:44 PM
As far as I know - from various internet sources, as I don't have Origin installed and prior to ME3, there's nothing that'll tempt me to do so - it does scan your .exe files. But that's it, as long as it doesn't recognize it as an Origin-game, it doesn't care if it's a Diabetes software, a flash-game or your latest self-extracting pdf of your next bank heist. It certainly - and this has been proven - does not phone back to the mothership. Unless it's doing so so utterly cunning that the world's governments would like to get their hands on this.

Being against Origin is great! Not buying games because of Origin is fantastic! I hope Origin becomes very, very Optional down the line, so that I can play EA games again without my login-times being tracked all the time (it's bad enough that Steam is doing this).

But this scaremongering is utter bullshit and will only do harm. "Oh, look at those stupid ludites, they're against everything and don't even understand why! Haha." This allows EA to continually release Pressreleases saying "No, don't worry, we're not scanning your tax. See? Our service is great."

duff
07-11-2011, 04:51 PM
I also believe only what I see with my own eyes.

Just install Process Explorer , open it , select Origin, and see for yourself what folders and files are being accessed.

It is looking for EA games to add to Origin. It turned my retail version of DA2 into a digital copy, which is fine by me. It is not going to discover I am a diabetic and try to kill me.

Seriously, just buy the game and enjoy it because your scare mongering is causing more hastle for your life than this supposed spying ever will do.

Wolfenswan
07-11-2011, 04:53 PM
I also believe only what I see with my own eyes.

Just install Process Explorer , open it , select Origin, and see for yourself what folders and files are being accessed.

Does it do that all the time? No. It does it when it's checking for installed games and/or wants to install a game (for which it has to be granted admin rights as it needs to alter file structure amongst other things). Steam accesses stuff "all over" your HD just the same when you're adding non-steam games to the list.

Show me the moment where it saves and/or sents the data.

I fully agree that Origin is a big POS but those claims are false and stupid. It's like a 5th grader running chkdsk on the school computer and claiming he's hacking the mainframe.

Alex Bakke
07-11-2011, 05:02 PM
Lets get one thing straight Origin performs privacy intrusion on users PC.

No mater where you stand. This was proven and tested. By numerous sources on internet.


- Asserts that such a case has been proven by multiple sources
- Only quotes a source with no URL

Wolfenswan
07-11-2011, 05:15 PM
- Asserts that such a case has been proven by multiple sources
- Only quotes a source with no URL

Google it? (http://www.google.de/search?q=This+video+shows+how+Origin+is+scanning+f olders+including+folders+containing+medical+data+-+in+this+case+a+special+software+for+diabetes.+The +software+is+used+by+diabetics+to+log+sugar+levels +and+other+medical+data.+Origin+scans+the+folders+ and+especially+reads+file+attributes+like+when+a+f ile+was+created+and+when+it+has+been+changed+the+l ast+time.+While+the+software+probably+does+not+rea d+the+contents+of+the+files+-+according+to+the+EULA+it+will+transmit+informatio n+about+the+installed+software+to+EA.&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:de:official&client=firefox-a)

The (german) video proof shows nothing besides Origin doing some reading on the harddrive, including files that are related to a tool for people with diabetes.

The CEO of EA Germany answered (http://www.ea.com/de/news/was-ist-dran-am-spyware-vorwurf) the "Origin is finding my hidden porn" claims already.

Unaco
07-11-2011, 05:18 PM
Numerous sources on internet! My gods man... Why aren't we all taking this seriously?!? They are the custodians of absolute truth after all.

Smashbox
07-11-2011, 06:01 PM
This is the part where I say my things about people not understanding what a 'source' even is anymore, or analyzing the authority of the people and places where they read things.

Megagun
07-11-2011, 06:12 PM
Lobotomist, I (and others with me) have asked you both on the RPS main page, and on Reddit, for your sources. Please provide them, and don't tell us to "use Process Explorer", as I did just that and it didn't reveal anything (other than that a lot of people don't know that you need to make a call to ReadFile to actually read files).

For the love of god, come up with sources to back your statements up, or drop your useless anti-Origin crusade. The only thing those screenshots have convinced me is that if you show vague screenshots of things people know nothing about, they'll believe anything you claim, even if it's blatantly false to those that do know what you're talking about.

EDIT: You actually want Process Monitor (another Sysinternals tool), rather than Process Explorer. Process Explorer allows you to see active TCP/IP connections, though, which you can then use to establish a proper Wireshark filter to actually monitor the network traffic.

sinister agent
07-11-2011, 06:14 PM
This is the part where I say my things about people not understanding what a 'source' even is anymore, or analyzing the authority of the people and places where they read things.

You're wrong, though. Google it.

Smashbox
07-11-2011, 06:18 PM
You're wrong, though. Google it.

I don't understand

Drake Sigar
07-11-2011, 06:25 PM
As far as I know - from various internet sources, as I don't have Origin installed and prior to ME3, there's nothing that'll tempt me to do so - it does scan your .exe files. But that's it, as long as it doesn't recognize it as an Origin-game, it doesn't care if it's a Diabetes software, a flash-game or your latest self-extracting pdf of your next bank heist. It certainly - and this has been proven - does not phone back to the mothership. Unless it's doing so so utterly cunning that the world's governments would like to get their hands on this.

This. I have seen no real evidence to suggest Origin intends to break into my computer and start rooting around for pictures of me in my Noddy costume. It's also not uncommon for software giants to add ridiculous terms to their EULA which are a load of hot air, being neither enforceable nor legally binding. Picture a department of grey haired old farts coming up with progressively more insane stipulations in order to scare Steve from head office into thinking their jobs are important, when in actuality they're about as worthless as men's nipples.

What you should be questioning, Lobo, is EA's horrible customer service record which is such a labyrinth that after going through their channels for even the simplest problem, you'll be shitting Minotaurs for the rest of the week.

Lobotomist
07-11-2011, 06:29 PM
Lobotomist, I (and others with me) have asked you both on the RPS main page, and on Reddit, for your sources. Please provide them, and don't tell us to "use Process Explorer", as I did just that and it didn't reveal anything (other than that a lot of people don't know that you need to make a call to ReadFile to actually read files).

For the love of god, come up with sources to back your statements up, or drop your useless anti-Origin crusade. The only thing those screenshots have convinced me is that if you show vague screenshots of things people know nothing about, they'll believe anything you claim, even if it's blatantly false to those that do know what you're talking about.

I can not phisically provide any more proof than what was posted all around the net. For example

http://s7.directupload.net/images/111028/enxmldba.jpg


Very same thing you see in Process Explorer when you run it from your PC.


I myself verified this together with I.T manager in company I work with (he is somewhat of BF nut)
But he does not like what he sees. And he uses hack that disables Origin.


Also, note:
Nobody said the Origin is scanning files. It only scans file names.

As for what it sends back to EA. This nobody can know except people that coded it.
Since such communication (and the communication itself exists) is encrypted.




But again.

EULA is there.
EA asked you for right to scan your PC. And you agreed.

Bottom line.


Either you are OK with it , or not.

That is the question

Megagun
07-11-2011, 06:35 PM
WHOA WHOA WHOA, GUYS! LOOK WHAT I JUST CAUGHT STEAM DOING! (mooses.nl/temp/OMGWTF_ARE_YOU_DOING_STEAM.png)

It's accessing TrueCrypt (http://www.truecrypt.org/), a tool I use to safely encrypt highly sensitive company data!! WHY WOULD STEAM ACCESS THAT KIND OF THING!?

It's even sending all this data to some company called Limelight Networks (http://www.limelight.com/). PROOF IS HERE (http://mooses.nl/temp/OMGSTEAM2.png). Why would they do this? I bet they're sending all the info from the company I work for straight to Valve HQ!!!

Also, OMG YOU GUYS, look what I just found in Steam's subscriber agreement (http://store.steampowered.com/subscriber_agreement/):


Valve may amend this Agreement at any time in its sole discretion. As a Subscriber, you agree that Valve may amend the terms of this Agreement. If Valve amends the Agreement, such amendment shall be effective thirty (30) days after your receiving notice of the amended Agreement, either via e-mail or as a notification within the Software. You can view the Agreement at any time at http://www.steampowered.com/. Your failure to cancel your Account thirty (30) days after receiving notification of an amended Agreement will mean that you accept all such amendments. If you don't agree to the amendments or to any of the terms in this Agreement, your only remedy is to cancel your Account or a particular Subscription.

SO, IF I READ THIS RIGHT, they can AT ANY TIME decide to do nasty stuff to our collective asses, and all we can do is terminate our account with Steam, thus losing all our games? Guys, it is obvious that this is some evil scheme to take our money and then run with it!

Grizzly
07-11-2011, 06:53 PM
Installing Process Monitro and checking the (shitload of) data it produces on origin has not turned up anything conclusive. Origin is busy with itself for now.

sinister agent
07-11-2011, 06:56 PM
I don't understand

I was being silly in a bid to mock the people who make a claim and then refuse to back it up, and instead insist that the people they're talking to go and do their research for them, and/or think that the mere existence of a website that says something proves that the something is true.

It wasn't very funny. If it makes you feel any better, I have killed myself.

Lobotomist
07-11-2011, 07:00 PM
Its true Steam does the same scan ( as far as we know )

But its optional. (you obviously opted in)

It is not by any means : "Agree to have your PC scanned, if you want to play our games"


As for EULA

It says that if EULA changes, you will have 30 days to agree or disagree.

Again OPTION.



This Steam argument was used over and over by EA apologists. But its just false to compare one service that DEMANDS privacy scan , and other that ASKS FOR PERMISSION (which you can refuse and still use the service)

Smashbox
07-11-2011, 07:08 PM
If it makes you feel any better, I have killed myself.

Yes. Yes, that will do.

Megagun
07-11-2011, 07:15 PM
Steam doesn't ask for permission. It just scans my harddrive as soon as I want to add C:\games\pieslicer2000\pie.exe to Steam as a non-steam game. I know the file path, want to add it to Steam's game list, but it'll scan as soon as I click "add a non-steam game to my library". That is not asking for permission; that is taking permission. I'll agree that there is a difference in how Steam and Origin do the scanning business (Origin seems to do it automatically, Steam does it only when you hit that shiny button) but I'm not "obviously opting in"; I simply do not have any information regarding what will happen as soon as I click that shiny and tempting "add a non-steam game to my library" button. Opting-in requires a conscious decision.

(Actually, technically both Steam and Origin asked me for permission. That's what their EULA is for)

As far as the 30-day EULA thing goes: that's not an option at all. That's much more like someone holding a loaded gun to your head, and asking you if you want to receive a slap in the face. Only problem is, they add a little sidenote: not receiving a slap in the face will result in the gun being fired. You don't really have an option here, and you're pretty much forced to accept the slapping. Sure, Steam doesn't exactly kill you if you decide to decline their new EULA, but they'll effectively make you lose access to however many monies you have invested in them.

The problem here is that you're pointing at EA/Origin like they're doing something completely different than anyone else. I don't mind you asking people what exactly their feelings are regarding EULAs (in fact, I applaud the move!), but you're not exactly honest by witholding the fact that what EA/Origin are doing is done by other digital distributors as well. Your wording screams "EA IS EVIL!!!", whereas it should say "PRACTICALLY EVERY SOFTWARE PUBLISHER EVER IS EVIL!!!".


If it makes you feel any better, I have killed myself.
Wait, then how are you typing that? Are you a time traveller or something? Did you have some kind of fancy will that resulted in that post? Questions that need answers!

Grizzly
07-11-2011, 07:15 PM
Its true Steam does the same scan ( as far as we know )

But its optional. (you obviously opted in)

It is not by any means : "Agree to have your PC scanned, if you want to play our games"


As for EULA

It says that if EULA changes, you will have 30 days to agree or disagree.

Again OPTION.



This Steam argument was used over and over by EA apologists. But its just false to compare one service that DEMANDS privacy scan , and other that ASKS FOR PERMISSION (which you can refuse and still use the service)

Steam does not ask for permisson. There is just this button that does not speficially tells what it does.

Lobotomist
07-11-2011, 07:29 PM
@Megagun

It actually happens when Steam asks you for permission to scan your system.
There is a clear pop-up. You probably agreed to it once in past.

But than again.

Let take your point and say Steam is doing exact same privacy intrusion.

Does that makes it OK ?


Its exactly what I was talking about: The excuse of precedent.

Once one company does it, and we agree - it becomes accepted practice.



I dont think we should let this happen. For our own sake.
Be this Steam or Origin.


I myself said NO. Although I really want this game.

And hopefully many others will do the same.
And than the companies will change this intrusion. And again with "The excuse of precedent"
It will become UNACCEPTED practice. What they tried to bend us to do, we bend them instead.

It works.
It was proven so many times before that we as community can make changes happen.

Nalano
07-11-2011, 07:37 PM
Possible motive for checking for installed programs:

Marketing (X number of people own Y, let's market more of Z)
Spying (Hey, our game's been pirated by this guy! And we have all his contact info! Hehehehe...)

Megagun
07-11-2011, 07:46 PM
It actually happens when Steam asks you for permission to scan your system.
There is a clear pop-up. You probably agreed to it once in past.
I can't remember ever agreeing to something like this in a clear popup as you describe. Can you provide me with a source for this?


Let take your point and say Steam is doing exact same privacy intrusion.

Does that makes it OK ?
Is it okay that Steam and Origin scan my system for installed programs or file names? Actually, yes. I don't really mind that at all. They're providing me with a service that can't exist without scanning my system for installed programs, and as such I'll happily agree with it.

Unaco
07-11-2011, 07:48 PM
Possible motive for checking for installed programs:

To find all the installed games from the company/publisher/dev to add to the application (which Origin seems to be doing).
To find all possible exes to add to the application (which Steam does when you click "Add non-Steam game").

Smashbox
07-11-2011, 07:50 PM
The most likely goal of this info-grabbing, to my mind, is "possible future uses."

Nalano
07-11-2011, 07:53 PM
To find all the installed games from the company/publisher/dev to add to the application (which Origin seems to be doing).
To find all possible exes to add to the application (which Steam does when you click "Add non-Steam game").

I'm reminded of virus scans that think other virus scans are viruses and act accordingly.
I'm also reminded of DRM that sought out and shut down filesharing, CD-burning and virtual drive software.

Grizzly
07-11-2011, 08:29 PM
I wonder if Origin is doing such illegal stuff, why my virus Heuristic scanner hasn't gone off and labeled it as a trojan.

It actually has gone off and labelled some uninstall programs as a trojan, so I wonder why this has not happened for origin.

vinraith
07-11-2011, 08:37 PM
Where do you stand?

Out of the way. This is a situation I'm very content to let develop and mature without me being involved in it. There are no EA games of any interest between now and ME3. ME3 is increasingly looking like something I'll be bargain-bin purchasing. That leaves loads of time to see what's really going on, in lieu of wild speculation, panic, or denial. If it's a problem, I'll simply skip ME3 (may be for the best anyway) and that will be that. EA doesn't put out much I care about these days anyway, so this one's pretty easy from my perspective.

acidtestportfolio
07-11-2011, 08:39 PM
i hope ea is comfortable with all the detailed, lurid filth that i am constantly handing over to them via my web browser

terabytes and terabytes of filth

Nalano
07-11-2011, 09:24 PM
i hope ea is comfortable with all the detailed, lurid filth that i am constantly handing over to them via my web browser

terabytes and terabytes of filth

That oughta be funny when all future games from EA end up being softcore porn.

...oh wait (http://www.rockpapershotgun.com/forums/showthread.php?1876-Shall-we-talk-about-Skyrim&p=54688&viewfull=1#post54688).

acidtestportfolio
07-11-2011, 09:26 PM
That oughta be funny when all future games from EA end up being softcore porn.

...oh wait (http://www.rockpapershotgun.com/forums/showthread.php?1876-Shall-we-talk-about-Skyrim&p=54688&viewfull=1#post54688).

i have not succeeded unless there is random bondage porn in fifa '13

duff
07-11-2011, 09:32 PM
I'd actually love it if Origin and Steam could detect pirated games. About time those wankers got what they deserve. I wonder how many people scare mongering are actually just afraid that their own illegal practices will be uncovered.

acidtestportfolio
07-11-2011, 09:34 PM
I'd actually love it if Origin and Steam could detect pirated games. About time those wankers got what they deserve. I wonder how many people scare mongering are actually just afraid that their own illegal practices will be uncovered.

yes, let's alienate potential customers even further for daring to defy the authority

that's good for business

Smashbox
07-11-2011, 09:36 PM
For the sake of argument - I don't want meth cooks in my neighborhood. Or crack houses. But I would rather have meth cooks and crack houses than have authorities invade my privacy and my home looking for criminal residences.

duff
07-11-2011, 09:40 PM
yes, let's alienate potential customers even further for daring to defy the authority

that's good for business

Legitimate customers would have absolutely nothing to worry about. I take it these 'potential customers' your talking about have relaxed attitudes to paying for what they take?

acidtestportfolio
07-11-2011, 09:43 PM
Legitimate customers would have absolutely nothing to worry about. I take it these 'potential customers' your talking about have relaxed attitudes to paying for what they take?

1: "if you haven't done anything wrong you have nothing to fear"

2: snide 'holier than thou' condemnation at imaginary class of customers

Nalano
07-11-2011, 09:46 PM
I'd actually love it if Origin and Steam could detect pirated games. About time those wankers got what they deserve. I wonder how many people scare mongering are actually just afraid that their own illegal practices will be uncovered.

Funniest bit? Gabe Newell's getting rich using Steam to sell to those very same pirates.

Smashbox
07-11-2011, 09:46 PM
1: "if you haven't done anything wrong you have nothing to fear"


Scariest justification for anything ever?

Nalano
07-11-2011, 09:48 PM
Scariest justification for anything ever?

Justification for the Patriot Act, which basically just treats any American citizen as a potential terrorist.

/justgotallpoliticalallupinhere

acidtestportfolio
07-11-2011, 09:49 PM
Scariest justification for anything ever?

not only scary, but incredibly, incredibly effective

Nalano
07-11-2011, 09:51 PM
not only scary, but incredibly, incredibly effective

Effective at pushing Orwellian policies on an uninformed electorate, that is.

deano2099
08-11-2011, 05:02 AM
I'd actually love it if Origin and Steam could detect pirated games. About time those wankers got what they deserve. I wonder how many people scare mongering are actually just afraid that their own illegal practices will be uncovered.
Not really. All it would do is turn people who buy some games and pirate others into people who pirate everything to be 'safe'. See also MS banning hacked 360s from live, so you can't get patches or dlc for legit games but you can if you pirate.

duff
08-11-2011, 05:22 AM
True, good point. But not if games are exclusive to platforms like Steam or Origin. Seems like the next step up from DRM, unfortunately it will be just as annoying for legitimate gamers.

soldant
08-11-2011, 07:06 AM
True, good point. But not if games are exclusive to platforms like Steam or Origin. Seems like the next step up from DRM, unfortunately it will be just as annoying for legitimate gamers.
Steam games can be pirated. The only real way to effectively combat pirates is to either have a multiplayer game, offer exceptionally good value, or support your game through free content updates and proper patches. None of them stop piracy, but they all give it a decent hit. ARMA2 piracy is pointless for example because of the continual patching process and plethora of content that will rely on the latest patches and unmodified EXEs. Valve do well because their games are good value for money.

Modern Warfare 3 and similar titles, which are expensive, short and primarily focused on console MP, are going to get the sweet loving rice pirated out of them.

Mohorovicic
08-11-2011, 07:14 AM
Valve do well because their games are good value for money.

Not really, but they do a real good job of muddying the value by constantly making bundles and other "occassions".

Nalano
08-11-2011, 07:46 AM
True, good point. But not if games are exclusive to platforms like Steam or Origin. Seems like the next step up from DRM, unfortunately it will be just as annoying for legitimate gamers.

The problem is solved - has been solved - by Valve by making the legitimately purchased product easier to procure than the pirated version.

coldvvvave
08-11-2011, 08:35 AM
The problem is solved - has been solved - by Valve by making the legitimately purchased product easier to procure than the pirated version.
This is actually true. I pirated games before, now I don't, Steam spoiled me - I'm too lazy to pirate games.

soldant
08-11-2011, 09:12 AM
Not really, but they do a real good job of muddying the value by constantly making bundles and other "occassions".
The Orange Box was dubious value, I'll give you that, given that the only real "full" game was probably TF2, which has since been purchased like a gazillion times over, not to mention Mann Co Store profits. But they do pack quite a bit into their games, and they don't pull ridiculous region pricing stunts on Australia.

orcane
08-11-2011, 01:11 PM
Maybe it has to do with Australian prices being way high, but here they're abusing their European "payment in EUR mandatory unless you're in the UK" scheme just like everyone else on the platform, with eg. Portal 2 being released for 50 EUR = 50 USD (that's roughly +40% for me). The only time Steam is good value for money since they introduced mandatory EUR pricing is during sales.

Donjo
08-11-2011, 01:28 PM
not only scary, but incredibly, incredibly effective

Heyyy... why don't we just round up everyone we don't like? They can work in camps. That's effective!

Sorry. Just following the natural devlelopments up in here.

soldant
08-11-2011, 01:39 PM
Maybe it has to do with Australian prices being way high, but here they're abusing their European "payment in EUR mandatory unless you're in the UK" scheme just like everyone else on the platform, with eg. Portal 2 being released for 50 EUR = 50 USD (that's roughly +40% for me). The only time Steam is good value for money since they introduced mandatory EUR pricing is during sales.
Most of the other retailers do that with the Australian Steam store: they enforce USD pricing on us. Back before the AUD reached parity, this meant that the AUD prices were actually about $20 more expensive. Which pissed a lot of us off because what a lot of publishers would do was put the Steam version (using digital distribution) at the same price as the boxed copy... except in USD. So if you had to pay $89.95 AUD for a boxed copy, it'd be $89.95 USD on Steam, which often amounted to like $90-$100 or something when Steam started to pick up steam.

Thankfully with the dollar hovering around 1:1 it's not such a big issue, but a lot of publishers put their Steam games equal to boxed copies in terms of pricing, which makes absolutely no sense. I'm getting less with digital distribution, so why do I pay the same?

Kadayi
08-11-2011, 01:58 PM
No mater where you stand.

http://ts4.mm.bing.net/images/thumbnail.aspx?q=1296052062019&id=896483bcfd943659e9bddf7f262116c8http://ts4.mm.bing.net/images/thumbnail.aspx?q=1296052062019&id=896483bcfd943659e9bddf7f262116c8

I'd hope not. Larry the Cable Guy is annoying as hell.

sinister agent
08-11-2011, 02:17 PM
I'd actually love it if Origin and Steam could detect pirated games. About time those wankers got what they deserve. I wonder how many people scare mongering are actually just afraid that their own illegal practices will be uncovered.

If they did that, I would immediately pirate every single game of theirs on principle, and leave my PC on every night to help others do the same.

I wouldn't buy anything from a shop owner who rifled through my pockets as I was leaving, either. What people do outside the transaction is nobody else's goddamn business.

hamster
08-11-2011, 03:17 PM
Don't think they're allowed to do that. I think Windows Update used to detect if you have a pirated version and if so, it'd lock you out. Dubious legally, so they stopped the practice, i believe, and instead offered you a discount!

Taidan
08-11-2011, 04:41 PM
If they did that, I would immediately pirate every single game of theirs on principle, and leave my PC on every night to help others do the same.

I hadn't thought of that. I automatically crack most retail games I buy out of habit, because when it gets to the point where I have to swap a disc to play a game, I'm actually that lazy that I normally give up on the idea of playing that game and go for something else that's just a double-click away.

Presumably this means that if they're actively monitoring for pirates, I'd probably get flagged up on their servers. Nice.

deano2099
08-11-2011, 05:10 PM
Basically there's a fundamental flaw in trying to detect pirates and then 'punishing' them by locking them out of legitimately purchased games (which Origin or Steam could easily do) - they're clearly people who know how to get pirated games and don't have any huge moral qualms about it, so will just pirate the games they get locked out of.

Nalano
08-11-2011, 06:03 PM
If they did that, I would immediately pirate every single game of theirs on principle, and leave my PC on every night to help others do the same.

"I'm Spartacus!"

sinister agent
08-11-2011, 06:37 PM
I hadn't thought of that. I automatically crack most retail games I buy out of habit, because when it gets to the point where I have to swap a disc to play a game, I'm actually that lazy that I normally give up on the idea of playing that game and go for something else that's just a double-click away.

Presumably this means that if they're actively monitoring for pirates, I'd probably get flagged up on their servers. Nice.

I do the same, partly as I have lots of games from before the internet took over the world. Sites that provide fixed exes and the like are a bloody godsend. They shouldn't have to exist.


"I'm Spartacus!"

Heh. I would, though. If they're going to treat me like shit whatever I do, I might as well treat them with the same contempt, and punish them in turn. Businesses that treat their customers that badly deserve to fail.

Fortunately many companies seem to be figuring this much out.

Wooly Wugga Wugga
08-11-2011, 06:54 PM
If Origin is trying to find installed EA games why not just read the EA registry keys? It's quicker and more accurate.

Nalano
08-11-2011, 07:10 PM
I do the same, partly as I have lots of games from before the internet took over the world. Sites that provide fixed exes and the like are a bloody godsend. They shouldn't have to exist.

In my earlier days, I couldn't live without GameCopyWorld.

acidtestportfolio
08-11-2011, 08:45 PM
If Origin is trying to find installed EA games why not just read the EA registry keys? It's quicker and more accurate.

can be used by crackers to trick Origin into giving free copies

Taidan
08-11-2011, 10:57 PM
can be used by crackers to trick Origin into giving free copies

Wouldn't it just read the registry just the get at the game's unique serial code, then cross reference that with it's own database of registered codes? Can't you just directly type them into Origin anyway?