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View Full Version : M / 18 games playable in store



Citruspunch
08-11-2011, 05:57 PM
With MW3 front and center, what are your thoughts on if it should be playable on consoles in stores. As a M/18 rated game that is likely to be the biggest entertainment launch of the year, should it be playable in stores where ineligible consumers can play it?

Bristoff
08-11-2011, 06:05 PM
It's terrible, I can't help but think a 17-year-old is going to play this, then go on a murder spree because his simple, youthful, immature mind can't comprehend that it's a actually just a game. The rating system does a great job of keeping games away from ineligible consumers, and this just contradicts it.

Or, maybe it's time to do away with ratings for games since they serve no actual purpose at all?

acidtestportfolio
08-11-2011, 06:06 PM
just as long as kids don't see tits, then it's perfectly okay!

Althea
08-11-2011, 06:12 PM
Or, maybe it's time to do away with ratings for games since they serve no actual purpose at all?
Let's do away with them from movies, too! Kids would love to see a film called The Human Centipede!

Serenegoose
08-11-2011, 06:15 PM
Let's do away with them from movies, too! Kids would love to see a film called The Human Centipede!
If they are aware of its existence, the rating is unlikely to dissuade them from encountering it. Plus if it shocks them, big deal. They looked for it. When did kids turn into fragile porcelain things that shatter at the slightest touch?


I also don't care about children playing 18 rated games in store - especially when they're probably in that store with their parents to buy the game anyway, and it isn't going to do them any harm.

acidtestportfolio
08-11-2011, 06:25 PM
Let's do away with them from movies, too! Kids would love to see a film called The Human Centipede!

yes, thank you for the slippery slope

metalangel
08-11-2011, 06:26 PM
just as long as kids don't see tits, then it's perfectly okay!

Wrong country. Any kid can just open one of the tabloids on the rack in every supermarket and see the page 3 girl's waps as well as what she thinks about Ed Millband's bulging eyes or the Greek debt or if we should nuke the crap out of some Iranians.

Keep
08-11-2011, 06:37 PM
If they are aware of its existence, the rating is unlikely to dissuade them from encountering it. Plus if it shocks them, big deal. They looked for it. When did kids turn into fragile porcelain things that shatter at the slightest touch?

Yes. Kids seek this stuff out. Or do you not remember the frightening thrill of trying to find [insert appropriate forbidden media of the day]?

It ain't easy being a parent, staying on top of things. At some point, your kid's likely going to break a bone, going to come home one day and have been bullied, going to fail a test or play truant, going to encounter smut, death, injustice, and yes, is definitely going to play some disgustingly ultra-violent videogame.

What's important isn't how you avoid that stuff. Because you can't. What's important is how you deal with it afterward.

QuantaCat
08-11-2011, 06:42 PM
ahhhhh ratings. my old enemy.

Basically, a system to present parents a way to not care about what your kids are doing, but instead can see a number on a piece of carton or a screen and judge by that. great system, dat.

R-F
08-11-2011, 06:47 PM
I wish ratings were more heavily enforced so I don't have to listen to kids on mic.

Nalano
08-11-2011, 07:00 PM
Because the ratings system has done such a great job outta keeping violent games out of children's hands!

But really, if the kid has watched an hour of prime-time television, the kid's seen it all.

I'd argue that the folks who'd least want to see their game played in the store is Activision, because a kid could finish the entire campaign in one sitting.

Norskov
08-11-2011, 07:02 PM
Yes. Kids seek this stuff out. Or do you not remember the frightening thrill of trying to find [insert appropriate forbidden media of the day]?

It ain't easy being a parent, staying on top of things. At some point, your kid's likely going to break a bone, going to come home one day and have been bullied, going to fail a test or play truant, going to encounter smut, death, injustice, and yes, is definitely going to play some disgustingly ultra-violent videogame.

What's important isn't how you avoid that stuff. Because you can't. What's important is how you deal with it afterward.

Exactly. My, in hindsight very misinformed and easily persuadable, grandmother bought GTA 3 as a Christmas present for me when I was 12(It was released in 2001 :O). I did spend some time discussing it with my parents, but they ended up agreeing that I was mature enough to play it. They never seemed to understand why the violence was funny(not sure if this is the right word here), but I had no difficulties separating reality from fiction. It comes down to parents talking with their kids and putting up boundaries if the deem it necessary.

Drake Sigar
08-11-2011, 07:26 PM
I believe in the UK rating system. It's not perfect, and is little defence against the parent who would rather shut their kid up with an hour on a hooker killing simulator than actually do that whole parenting thing, but at least the industry have their ass covered. Just because kids will seek out material inappropriate for their age, doesn't mean we should just hand over our secret stash of hardcore Gandalf porn. It's a parent's job to decide what is and isn't ok for their children, every kid is different.

sinister agent
08-11-2011, 07:40 PM
I still remember buying Cannon Fodder and Mortal Kombat etc. from Electronics Boutique. I'm not even sure if I was in double figures. Good times, back when nobody gave a toss.

I also remember when people said "search" instead of "google". And food was free and people I disagreed with politically didn't exist.

Mohorovicic
08-11-2011, 07:48 PM
With MW3 front and center, what are your thoughts on if it should be playable on consoles in stores.

Of course not, and I do not know what sort of irresponsible twat would allow for consoles to be publicly accessible by children.

This is an outrage, I say.

sabrage
09-11-2011, 12:34 AM
hardcore Gandalf porn

Speaking of slippery slopes...

Nalano
09-11-2011, 12:36 AM
Speaking of slippery slopes...

You know it's out there.

It's only a matter of time 'til you Google it.

R-F
09-11-2011, 12:52 AM
Of course not, and I do not know what sort of irresponsible twat would allow for consoles to be publicly accessible by children.

This is an outrage, I say.

I do not know what sort of irresponsible twat would allow the same game to be mistakenly released over and over with a new skin plastered on top!

This is an outrage, I say!

strange headache
09-11-2011, 01:23 AM
Have you ever watched TV in the afternoon? Pseudo-reality TV, Talk-shows and all that crap is far worse than a few pixels of blood. At least with games, kids know that it's not real, but when you watch mainstream TV you get the impression that every adult member of our society is a degenerated prick leeching off of our social system while fucking his step-mom and all her cousins at the same time. Heck, even watching a regular kids channel is completely disgusting with Hannah Montana and High School Musical teaching our 6 year old a highly sexualised reality dressed in slutty outfits while shaking its hips to mind-numbing pop music.

QuantaCat
09-11-2011, 03:02 PM
I do not know what sort of irresponsible twat would allow the same game to be mistakenly released over and over with a new skin plastered on top!

This is an outrage, I say!

Can you please stick to the topic at hand? (humour is fine, bad humour, however..)

Like I said earlier, the "good parent" (whatever that means) knows exactly the content. And anyhow, you cant influence kids much more after theyve hit a certain age, and it is well before 18, after that they decide for themselves, if they havent already.

CuriousOrange
09-11-2011, 04:05 PM
Poppycock. Branding influences people throughout their lives. People are very easily influenced and are mostly unaware of it. It can even change the way something tastes.

Vandelay
09-11-2011, 08:20 PM
The very fact that CoD is an 18 rated game is a little odd. I'm not sure whether this one decides to include any needless torture sequence, but if it were not for the controversy seeking moments every CoD game now needs to have, they are very much a PG-13/12A depiction of war. Film studios would certainly not want an 18/American equivalent rated film being made, if it hoped to be so widely bought. It's always struck as a bit of a double standard, with games definitely receiving significantly higher ratings than film. Not only that, but it also seems like a desirable, as if your game would be shunned if it did not try to receive as high a rating as possible.

And yet, there are very few games that I do not think would be suitable for a young audience (12+). Very few games ever attempt to challenge us, beyond the obvious, and rarely ever actually become mature. The majority end up playing very much to the audience it is meant to not be suitable for.

The only element that does worry me slightly is the depiction of female characters and minorities. I don't think it is intentional on the part of the developers, but the negative stereotypical writing seems to offer much more potential for damaging the development of a child compared to the shooting of imaginary men.