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View Full Version : Does "Need for Speed" Become an Annual Release?



squirrel
20-11-2011, 04:59 AM
Recently while I shop around, I noticed that a new Need for Speed title, The Run, was released. I recalled that early this year we have Shift 2 already, and by the late last year we have Hot Pursuit. For the same racing game EA seems to be releasing updates too frequently, dont you think?

I wonder if EA should simply add the launching year of the game to the end of the title, so that it becomes official the release of a Need for Speed title is an annual event.

I hope this doesnt become a trend for quick cash squeezing.

zookeeper
20-11-2011, 05:08 AM
I hope this doesnt become a trend for quick cash squeezing.

I'm pretty sure it already is a trend for many series out there.

Shane
20-11-2011, 05:11 AM
They aren't really the same games, you know, one could just say that they are exploiting the NFS tag to the fullest.

agentorange
20-11-2011, 05:37 AM
Yeah NFS is more of a brand name, and has always been that way. I think it's just the same case we see with a lot of new games, where an original idea might be proposed, but rather than take a chance with a new title they simply slap the high selling NFS tag on it. Though with Shift 2 I believe they have completely removed the NFS tag, similar to how they tried removing the CoD tag from MW2.

All those NFS games you mentioned play very differently: Shift and Shift 2 lean towards simulation, and have closed tracks and rally racing, Hot Pursuit is like the NFS Burnout (though that's simplifying it, since the chase modes are really fantastic), and the Run is totally experimental with its cross country racing. I have no problem with them reusing the NFS tag so long as the games themselves are quality. Though I've heard The Run is dire shit.

Edit: The Dirt games have become something of an annual release.

Rii
20-11-2011, 06:16 AM
Need For Speed is a great example of how to manage a franchise I think. Lots of variety there and sub-franchises even if the occasional idea or execution does fall flat.

The failure of The Run is unfortunate. Not only because the concept had promise - and still does - but because its failure means EA is less likely to take a similar risk the next time around.

Bristoff
20-11-2011, 11:42 AM
Need For Speed is a great example of how to manage a franchise I think. Lots of variety there and sub-franchises even if the occasional idea or execution does fall flat.

The failure of The Run is unfortunate. Not only because the concept had promise - and still does - but because its failure means EA is less likely to take a similar risk the next time around.

If it means that EA won't use Michael Bay to 'direct' a trailer again, then it's surely worth though?

Rii
20-11-2011, 12:31 PM
If it means that EA won't use Michael Bay to 'direct' a trailer again, then it's surely worth though?

Hah. Actually I thought that trailer was pretty awesome. Pity the game didn't live up to it.

Althea
20-11-2011, 02:01 PM
And it's not like EA are using the same studio for each one as some publishers would.

Slightly Mad Studios did Shift 1+2.
EA Black Box's last one was The Run (and World, but we won't count that), and before that was Undercover. They are arguably the "main" developers of the franchise, however.
Criterion did Hot Pursuit.

So there's lots of different ideas and views coming into the mix to keep it fresh.