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View Full Version : "More MRSA Found In U.S. Retail Meat (Turkey, Too)"



Heister
23-11-2011, 12:30 PM
From the article -

"There are two new studies out that confirm, once again, that drug-resistant staph or MRSA ó normally thought of as a problem in hospitals and out in everyday life, in schoolkids, sports teams, jails and gyms ó is showing up in animals and in the meat those animals become."

"Clearly, agriculture isnít going to offer this data on its own. And as the report makes clear, the U.S. government (unlike those of Canada, the Netherlands or Denmark) isnít pushing. Until it does, the search for MRSA and other resistant organisms in meat is likely to to proceed via papers like these two: incremental, local and subject to the initiative of individual investigators ó but not able to tell the general public as much as they deserve to know about risks in their food." http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2011/11/mrsa-us-meat/



"Clearly, agriculture isnít going to offer this data on its own. And as the report makes clear, the U.S. government (unlike those of Canada, the Netherlands or Denmark) isnít pushing."

That doesn't surprise me one bit.

squirrel
24-11-2011, 01:44 PM
Could this fact indicate that some livestock raisers use antibiotics to stimulate meat growth?

I dont know who invent this practice, but unfortunately this becomes so damn common in China.

Grizzly
25-11-2011, 06:04 PM
Preventive anti-biotics have been a common practice in medicine, unfortunately. It is, however, a practice one would probably never weed out because of the short term benifits it brings. It is like people continiously re-registering accounts after being continiously banned. It gives the person a short term benefit, but only harms the 'collective' as a whole in the long run.

The inventors? Either the veternarians (There are often two types: Those who love the job, and those who love the money), or the farmers. However, both the second and the first should know better, and both should object if either one raises the possibility.