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Splynter
06-12-2011, 01:25 AM
Well, I've been smoking for about 6 years now, and I would really like to quit. I'm at about a half a pack per day, and it's just making me feel crappy in general. I've tried to quit a couple of times before cold turkey with varying degrees of success- my longest without was about 3 months. Has anyone had any success kicking the habit?

sabrage
06-12-2011, 01:40 AM
I quit cold turkey the day I realized that I was becoming dependent on cigarettes. The effects on my health were really a non-factor; I don't put a lot of stock in the idea of a "long and healthy life" because I'm a big cynic anyways. I realized that after a movie, or a meal, or sex (or any activity that precluded actually smoking) I felt like I needed a cigarette. I wasn't smoking for the satisfaction of smoking itself, I was smoking because it was becoming increasingly my habit to do so, and that really bothered me. I only smoked for about 6 months though, so maybe this won't apply to you. If you do quit cold turkey, try to avoid other people that smoke or find somebody else to quit with, otherwise you'll probably fall back into the same patterns.

Splynter
06-12-2011, 01:50 AM
Yeah, it's become very much a habit. Just woke up? Have a smoke. Walking to class? Have a smoke. Just ate? Have a smoke. I don't know when I last actually enjoyed a smoke, it's just part of my routine.

pakoito
06-12-2011, 03:19 AM
Do some math: how much money would you save a month if you didn't smoke. If that doesn't make you quit, you're not ready yet.

sabrage
06-12-2011, 06:35 AM
A lot of people recommend substituting cigarettes with candy or gum, but for me that never really worked for me because the social aspect of smoking was such a big part of the appeal. I was so bad at meeting new people at university that I started smoking pretty much as a conversation starter. I had an old guitar just laying around my dorm, so I decided to man up and finally learn to play it. The self-confidence and friends I gained in the process replaced any residual cravings I had. If music isn't for you, the only other substitute activities I can think with that social side are gaming (which I'm sure you've tried) and exercise. I mean, you could join a book club, but that doesn't really satisfy the compulsiveness of smoking. I'm assuming you don't want to replace one addiction with another, so weed and nicotine supplements are out.

The only other advice I have is to quit drinking for a while, at least if you have cravings when you do. I had such a hard time divorcing smoking from drinking that it was impossible not to smoke when I went out with my friends. A month or two later I could destroy my liver to my heart's content; no cravings.

soldant
06-12-2011, 07:26 AM
*The following does not constitute official healthcare advice, see doctor etc*

It sounds as though you can beat off the cravings (since you managed to last 3 months) so it's probably just the routine that's getting to you. Not sure exactly where you live, but I know that at least here in Australia there are devices which are basically plastic tubes to deliver the nicotine hit without the smoke inhalation. Can't remember what they're called, seen some of my patients using them though. That might help with the "routine" aspect of having to do something, which patches won't really help with.

You might also try your GP and see if they have any advice. Again not sure where you live but there's probably something similar to Quitline over here made up of clinicians and support workers who can give better guidance on quitting specific to you. Whatever you do though, do it now. You don't want to be struggling to breathe tethered to a bottle of medical oxygen every time you get up to take a piss.

Kadayi
06-12-2011, 08:34 AM
Cold turkey is really the best way. The main thing I'd recommend is avoid putting yourself in situations that where in you'd normally smoke (like going to a pub) esp if you have friends who still smoke (the temptation is usually too great) for quite a few months (smokers love nothing more to validate their own addiction by luring non smokers back). Also when you feel like having a cigarette instead have a small glass of water (even if that means holding two drinks). The the key thing is breaking that oral habit and of having something to do with your hands.

Also get a tin and put the money you would of spent on cigarettes into it daily (at the end of the day) and then cash it in after a couple of months. Visibly seeing what you've saved (rather than it existing in your bank account) is very powerful. Though naturally don't do this if you're massively OD.

Ian
06-12-2011, 10:47 AM
Have you tried/considered trying the electric cigarettes? I've seen people saying about them online the same thing a person I actually know has said, which was that he went onto them and without even particularly planning to give up as quick as he has. The guy I know was just intending to cut down at first but I think he was off cigarettes altogether in a matter of a two or three months, and he still is.

squirrel
06-12-2011, 03:15 PM
As an urbaner with lot of living pressure, I often consider that smoking is not that a bad health habit. I am serious. If smoking help to reduce stress, it would be much healthier than without smoking but under huge pressure. Of course, you have to keep it under control, smoking one to two cigarette would be optimal. More than that and all the problems come.

And quitting smoking definitely require medical consultation. Dont do it yourself. If you quit all a sudden, it could be the moment when cancer strikes you. I dont know the exact why but my doctor does warn me that. Some people may even require some medicine for assistance for their bodies to be adapted to smoke-free environment. The point being, you have to gradually reduce the rate of smoke. But at what rate? That you would need a doctor to answer that.

kirrus
06-12-2011, 03:53 PM
As far as I was aware, the only addiction that can kill you with withdrawal is alcohol, everything else you can suffer through

Alex Bakke
06-12-2011, 04:32 PM
If you quit all a sudden, it could be the moment when cancer strikes you. I dont know the exact why but my doctor does warn me that.
I, uh, what.

Juan Carlo
06-12-2011, 06:01 PM
I smoked for years. I quit cold turkey a year ago. It's not as hard as people make it out to be, but for me I was in college and grad school and I absolutely needed to smoke while I was writing. I couldn't write without it. So finally getting out of school helped me as I had less daily writing to do.

But yeah towards the end I just felt really shitty all the time and smoking wasn't fun or enjoyable as much as just something I had to do. When I lived in dorms it was more managable as I couldn't smoke in doors, which limits how much you can do, but when I got my own place I was smoking constantlly--like a pack a day. So I thought it was time to quit. Plus, I always wanted to quit before I turned 30 as while smoking is fun in your 20s, a 30+ person who still smokes is just kind of sad to me.

I do miss it, though. There was nothing more fun than getting hepped up on coffee and cigarettes and playing a twitch fest first person shooter.

Rakysh
06-12-2011, 06:15 PM
As far as I was aware, the only addiction that can kill you with withdrawal is alcohol, everything else you can suffer through

This is not really a true thing. http://www.heroinabuse.us/withdrawal.html <-cite.

Skalpadda
06-12-2011, 06:16 PM
I've tried to quit unsuccessfully more times than I can keep track of so I switched from cigarettes to snus (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snus), which is not much better but at least I don't bother others and don't walk around smelling like an ashtray.

Going cold turkey really seems to be the best way to do it, but If you really want to quit but keep falling back, talk to a doctor. There are no miracle cures but there are plenty of things that can help and what's needed to make it seems to differ a lot from person to person.

Also Squirrel, that entire post just sounds.. mad.

Unaco
06-12-2011, 07:20 PM
And quitting smoking definitely require medical consultation. Dont do it yourself. If you quit all a sudden, it could be the moment when cancer strikes you. I dont know the exact why but my doctor does warn me that.

My advice to you... Get another Doctor, one that isn't called Dr Nick, who didn't get their medical degree over the internet, and isn't getting paid by the tobacco companies. Seriously... that is some dangerous and misinformed nonsense.

As for quitting smoking... Cold Turkey can be done, though it is difficult. About 10-11 years ago, me and a friend both managed to quit smoking through Cold Turkey... we agreed that, if he caught me smoking, he would get violent, and if I caught him smoking I could insult/lambast/ridicule him as much as I liked. It worked... for about 18 months or so, and then we started again for some reason.

I do still smoke these days... but it's really my only vice (no chemicals/drugs, don't drink except for special occasions, eat well, sleep well etc), and I don't smoke that much (I don't smoke it for the tobacco, but something else), tend to only smoke a couple in the evening, when I'm finished with all my work and the like.

I'm somewhat wary of any of these e-cigarettes and the gum and things like that. Yes, they possibly could make quitting easier, for certain individuals. But, on the whole, I think they're just a way to squeeze a little more money out of you when you're trying to quit.

Juan Carlo
06-12-2011, 08:55 PM
I'm somewhat wary of any of these e-cigarettes and the gum and things like that. Yes, they possibly could make quitting easier, for certain individuals. But, on the whole, I think they're just a way to squeeze a little more money out of you when you're trying to quit.

Everyone I know who has tried e-cigarettes has loved them. The only reason I never did was because they really aren't available around here.

I know there hasn't been any health studies done on them, but apart from just nicotine, they can't be as bad as cigarettes given that they don't have all the tar and additives and what not.

Splynter
06-12-2011, 09:41 PM
@sabrage
I've been playing instruments since I was 5, so can't start that as a replacement.

@soldant and Ian
I've seen those tubes, can't remember what they're called, they might be worth looking into. I think they're similar to the e-cigarettes.

@squirrel
I'm pretty sure that's false, abruptly cutting out a carcinogen doesn't prompt the onset of cancer as far as I know.

In general, I'd rather just stop without adding a new substitute to spend more money on. I suppose I just need to man up and quit, picking a date and all that. Unfortunately, final exam season isn't exactly a great time to do so.

Unaco
06-12-2011, 09:51 PM
I know there hasn't been any health studies done on them, but apart from just nicotine, they can't be as bad as cigarettes given that they don't have all the tar and additives and what not.

Of course they're better than cigarettes, I'll give that. But, are they a better method of quitting than "Unassisted Smoking Cessation", or quitting with willpower alone, cold turkey... and, are they a necessary thing. My problem is to do with the creeping medicalisation of a lot of things, quitting smoking being one of them. Here's the first study I came across looking at "Unassisted Smoking Cessation"...

http://www.plosmedicine.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pmed.1000216

Actually looking at the neglect of willpower alone in studies, because all of these other methods have lots of money behind them to run and publish studies into them. 2/3 - 3/4 of people who quit smoking each year, do it without assistance. It can be done.

I'll concede, from a cursory look at the research, assisted cessation does seem to be more effective than unassisted. They can help... but, then, assistance could mean some kind of behavioural therapy or something else, non-pharmacological. Something other than Nicotine Replacement Therapy. It's the pharmacological solutions I have a problem with, as I think they're unnecessary.

soldant
07-12-2011, 12:06 AM
Of course they're better than cigarettes, I'll give that. But, are they a better method of quitting than "Unassisted Smoking Cessation", or quitting with willpower alone, cold turkey... and, are they a necessary thing. My problem is to do with the creeping medicalisation of a lot of things, quitting smoking being one of them. Here's the first study I came across looking at "Unassisted Smoking Cessation"...
What you're saying is actually true. Back when I was still doing my nursing studies (which wasn't that long ago) I had to do an assignment on how to advise a patient on the best way to quit smoking... most of which I've forgotten because I do prehospital care, not preventative healthcare. I do remember though that from checking out studies the factor of "willpower" is often the better determinant on success.

That said, nicotine replacement therapy does help with the cravings through stimulation of nicotinic receptors. I don't think replacement therapy is necessarily bad, because if it helps people stop smoking that's a hell of a lot better than demanding that they use willpower alone and fail several times. In my state's public healthcare sector patients are prohibited from smoking on the wards and are offered nicotine patches. Or they go off the property to smoke. Or they try to smoke in the bathrooms where there's medical oxygen, which usually results in a PCW sitting there watching them so that they don't wipe out the ward in an inferno.


As an urbaner with lot of living pressure, I often consider that smoking is not that a bad health habit. I am serious. If smoking help to reduce stress, it would be much healthier than without smoking but under huge pressure. Of course, you have to keep it under control, smoking one to two cigarette would be optimal. More than that and all the problems come.
Go to your local hospital. Find a medical ward. Look for the people struggling to breathe with nasal prongs or masks hooked up to oxygen, who can't get up to take a leak without being totally incapacitated. That's where cigarette smoking will get you, including your "one to two" advice. If you're living in an urban environment you're already breathing in pollution. Deliberately adding to it is madness.

cjlr
07-12-2011, 01:50 AM
If you're living in an urban environment you're already breathing in pollution. Deliberately adding to it is madness.

But, that does raise the question - at what point does the addition (from smoking) become statistically significant? I have literally no idea, having never studied anything related to the matter, but if we assume some 'background' level of the adverse compounds is present in urban air... Is it one cigarette per day? week? month? year?

I smoke the occasional cigarette or cigar, but when I say occasional, I mean it. I last bought a pack of cigarettes in, oh, July, and I still have half of them, so that's what, one every two weeks? I just like a bit of a nicotine rush every now and then. Knowing how extraordinarily terrible it is for me keeps me from smoking any more often than that.

soldant
07-12-2011, 02:27 AM
But, that does raise the question - at what point does the addition (from smoking) become statistically significant? I have literally no idea, having never studied anything related to the matter, but if we assume some 'background' level of the adverse compounds is present in urban air... Is it one cigarette per day? week? month? year?
I don't know what it "equals" in terms of cigarettes but the ambient pollution is a lot less than deliberate inhalation of cigarette smoke. Smoking a cigarette is designed to introduce the chemicals directly into the airways.

You can see that over time people who live in built-up urban environments (particularly those with heavy dirty industry development) suffer from some lung damage over a long-enough period compared to someone who lives in the wilderness or something, but those who are regular smokers are much worse.

cjlr
07-12-2011, 09:31 PM
I don't know what it "equals" in terms of cigarettes but the ambient pollution is a lot less than deliberate inhalation of cigarette smoke. Smoking a cigarette is designed to introduce the chemicals directly into the airways.

You can see that over time people who live in built-up urban environments (particularly those with heavy dirty industry development) suffer from some lung damage over a long-enough period compared to someone who lives in the wilderness or something, but those who are regular smokers are much worse.

Okay, so obviously there's no direct comparison, but I was wondering if you had any rough idea, or where I could maybe find the data.

My somewhat fatalist logic is that, taking into account (my rather crude knowledge of) all the other stuff the modern developed world city dweller is exposed to (environmentally and through our food), and our other habits - drinking, (lack of) exercise - I'm not statistically affecting my own actuarials with a cigarette or two every few weeks.

sabrage
07-12-2011, 10:45 PM
I think that convincing yourself that cigarettes are a healthy - or at least not unhealthy - habit is a good way to develop long-term health problems.

DigitalSignalX
07-12-2011, 11:09 PM
I smoked in my teens and early 20's, cigarettes daily and pot about twice a month. I honestly feel it was never slowing me down, till I had a respiratory attack while horsing around in a pool and nearly drowned. I'd never had asthma before, but then I did suddenly. They call it adult onset asthma which is medical sciences way of saying "we have no clue why you get it as an adult instead of as a kid." So I quit cold turkey. It was mostly just a matter of changing habits, like fixing some tea/coffee after eating to keep my hands busy, or getting a slinky and other toys to play with while at the PC during idle moments. The hardest part, plaguing me still to this day even almost 20 years later is being with other smokers. I don't mind second hand smoke or if someone smokes in my car. It doesn't cause euphoria like some say they get after quitting, it's just comfortable. But it does cause a noticeable wheeze after a while, which I carry an inhaler to combat. Epic cliche, computer nerd with inhaler, but I blame smoking for it.

soldant
08-12-2011, 12:12 AM
Okay, so obviously there's no direct comparison, but I was wondering if you had any rough idea, or where I could maybe find the data.

My somewhat fatalist logic is that, taking into account (my rather crude knowledge of) all the other stuff the modern developed world city dweller is exposed to (environmentally and through our food), and our other habits - drinking, (lack of) exercise - I'm not statistically affecting my own actuarials with a cigarette or two every few weeks.
Um... I'm not aware of any journal articles or studies that specifically equate it. I don't know how it'd stand up as a valid piece of research. I suppose I can take a look though.

As far as I know, studies for occasional smoking suggests that occasional smokers increase their risk of related lung cancers (and similar cancers associated with smoking, like pancreatic or oral etc), but not to the same extent as someone who smokes regularly. Smoking one or two every few weeks isn't as bad as smoking one a day or something similar, but the introduction of smoke to the airways still causes damage and exposes you to the carcinogens present in tobacco cigarettes. So if you can quit, it's still best to do so. If you're overweight or a heavy abuser of alcohol (and clinically the definition of "heavy use" is usually far below what most alcohol abusers expect) with the pattern of smoking that you describe, then they're more likely to have an impact on overall health than smoking.

Not that it's a free pass to start smoking occasionally! Quitting is the best option all around, just like losing weight. :P

cjlr
08-12-2011, 02:31 AM
Hey, guys, no need to worry about my health here! I'm pretty fit and I don't drink that much, either. I've well aware that every single cigarette is bad for you in the way every single drink definitely isn't - but what I meant was that as far as I know, my one pack a year (if it's even that much) is not a statistically significant factor in my overall health. If you can't indulge a little even when you're twenty, when can you? If I'm wrong about that, to hell with the smokes.


I think that convincing yourself that cigarettes are a healthy - or at least not unhealthy - habit is a good way to develop long-term health problems.
That's only true so long as you shortsightedly keep thinking in terms of one more than your current habit; if one is negligible, then an increment of one is negligible, but the jump from none to some is only similarly negligible if the some value is only one anyway...

squirrel
08-12-2011, 02:39 AM
Yeah I know that my post sounds crazy, not only that it is not in our common knowledge, but most importantly it directly contradictes your common knowledge. Yet this is very essential health issue I feel obligied to tell you this.

Since we are talking about quiting smoking, of course I am referring to those who are already addicted to tobacco (and those who consider starting to smoke, evaluate the health risk first) for the issue. As you mates pointed out, the critical term is "abrupt". I am saying that if you are already addicted to tobacco, and you quit this addiction all of a sudden, say, a month ago you were smoking two packs a day (most tobacco addictives I know smoke at this rate), and you cut it day by day, one month later, i.e. today you quit completely, this I am also referring to as quitting abruptly. If one is found to have cancer later on (not only lung cancer, not even that lung is necessarily the first organ to fail), one may blame himself for quiting too late. But here is my point. One does not get cancer at that critical moment just because of the smoking habit, but becauase he quits his long term smoking habit too abruptly.

You dont have to trust me. Trust your doctor, a licensed medical doctor, as for what rate you should be quiting smoking if you are used to smoking. If the MD suggests some assistance by medinice, study the side-effects of those drugs, and why would you need those. Of course, I am not suggesting you to consult a MD as radical as Dr. House. My doctor told me that this very piece of knowledge is simply shared by EVERY licensed MD practicing western medinice. Of course, if one suggests that you can quit abruptly, then you can quit abruptly.

As for the issue of "optimal rate of smoking". I have to clarify that I am not suggesting that smoking one to two cigarretes carries no or neligible health risk. Tobacco carries toxic substance, and I am NOT arguing against this fact. My point being, that I actually pointed out two scenarios: one lives under huge living pressure (like me, and most smokers. I believe that relaxation is the first reason one gets into smoking), and one enjoys worryless life. In each scenario you have two choice, to smoke or not to smoke. If you are having no living pressure and yet you still pursuits the "coolness" of smoking, you are at your own risk to do so. Most commoners, I believe, are the "one lives under huge living pressure". Then you have to weigh, which choice brings you the most health risk? In case you haven't noitice, constantly negative emotion is one of the major cause so many health problems, including cancer. Unfortunately, the constantly negative emotion has become a prevailing social problem, although most governments try to remain silent on it so that they dont have to bear responsibility to solve it. To them, attributing it to personal problems solve their problems. But anyway, my whole point being, that life is imperfect, and you have to weigh the positves and negatives of all choices. And if you have to smoke, keep this habit under control. That's all.

soldant
08-12-2011, 02:52 AM
but what I meant was that as far as I know, my one pack a year (if it's even that much) is not a statistically significant factor in my overall health.
It will contribute in that it will increase the risk of cancer etc, but not to the same extent as someone who smokes a lot. So yeah, if you're happy with that, then carry on! Nobody has the right to tell you how to handle your health provided you're informed about it. Also: blah blah blah patient advocacy and the other stuff I never paid attention to at uni.

Now...

If one is found to have cancer later on (not only lung cancer, not even that lung is necessarily the first organ to fail), one may blame himself for quiting too late. But here is my point. One does not get cancer at that critical moment just because of the smoking habit, but becauase he quits his long term smoking habit too abruptly.
I don't know who your doctor is, but this is nonsense. Carcinogenic substances inhaled with tobacco smoking significantly increase the risk of the development of several types of cancer, particularly anything around the airways (including the mouth). To simplify cancer: a tumour essentially develops when a genetic problem causes a cell to effectively become "immortal", ignoring its "programmed" cell death and dividing like crazy. It becomes malignant (which is what we call "cancer") when it starts to ignore its defined borders and infiltrate other tissues and start "taking over", like an aggressive parasite.

Suddenly stopping smoking just stops you getting the nicotine hit (causing the cravings) and stops you from inhaling the carcinogens. If you find out the day after that you've got cancer, then it started developing prior to quitting. It's ridiculous to suggest that suddenly ceasing exposure to a hazard results in the negative effect of exposure. If you stop smoking, some recovery is possible (cancer notwithstanding, which requires different treatment) depending on how early you quit and the extent of damage. A "step down" approach where you reduce cigarette intake just prolongs exposure to the carcinogenic substances and makes things worse. I'm guessing your doctor was trying to tell you something else (I have no idea what, maybe it was about nicotine replacement therapy and a titration of dose to reduce dependence) and you've misunderstood. But it is not best practice (or even good practice!) to suggest that people slowly reduce their cigarette intake, and no credible evidence that suggests ceasing smoking immediately causes cancer.


In case you haven't noitice, constantly negative emotion is one of the major cause so many health problems, including cancer
I have seen no credible study to suggest that "negative emotion" is a cause of cancer, major or otherwise. Cancer is a physiological problem, not a mental health condition. Negative emotion affects the patient's perception of their health status, which may make them appear sick, but doesn't on its own suddenly cause cancer.

Alex Bakke
08-12-2011, 11:45 AM
If one is found to have cancer later on (not only lung cancer, not even that lung is necessarily the first organ to fail), one may blame himself for quiting too late. But here is my point. One does not get cancer at that critical moment just because of the smoking habit, but becauase he quits his long term smoking habit too abruptly.



You've given absolutely no data to support your claims, not even anecdotal evidence. Please find data before repeating such a silly statement. It may be a fine hypothesis, but you can't state it as perceived fat - It's irresponsible.

Xercies
08-12-2011, 12:42 PM
Also I think there are better ways to reduce stress then smoking to be honest.

Splynter
08-12-2011, 03:52 PM
As far as I'm concerned smoking is in no way beneficial. The 'benefits' I get from it, namely a catalyst for some socializing and stress relief, are either better served by other means or a product of my dependency. I did some math, and I do spend more than I would like to in a month on smokes, it's actually one of my larger expenses (I live a fairly spartan lifestyle anyway). As a way to encourage me to quit, I've decided that I'm going to put aside half of the money I save on smokes for the RPS Kindness Club, starting once I finish my current supply and ending around Christmas. It'll give me an incentive to stay honest with this.

Grizzly
08-12-2011, 06:23 PM
My grandpa did Cold Turkey by going into hospital, because he got cancer from smoking. He spent 4 months in hospital, and now is no longer addicted.

cardason
11-12-2011, 07:46 AM
I had been a smoker for years, not heavy but still a smoker (I smoked pouch tobacco around 1 50gram pouch every 2 weeks).

Then I was diagnosed with a disease called Multiple Sclerosis (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multiple_sclerosis). If you do not know what that is, it is a degenerative neurological condition in which the bodys immune system attacks the fatty sheathe (myelin) surrouding nerve tissue. This leads to plaques (scars) in your brain and spinal cord. Almost any neurological symptom can appear with the disease, and it often progresses to physical and cognitive disability.

And I found out that smoking speeds up the progression of the disease. I already need a walking frame to walk, and my neurologist says I will most likely end up in a wheelchair sooner or later, and this doesnt mention my other symptoms of which there are many. I prefer later.

So I went to my GP and asked for advice on quitting. He prescribed me some medication called Champix (Varenicline (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Varenicline)). It is a 3 month course, and it both reduces cravings for and decreases the pleasurable effects of cigarettes/tobacco. With this medication I was able to quit, though it still took some willpower. However the possibility of ending up in a wheelchair was a good motivator.

ado
11-12-2011, 09:03 PM
I've quit 2 months ago after 3 years of pack per day smoking. I've quit cold turkey and the 1st two weeks where pretty shitty, intense cravings etc. What I've found helpful is to keep your hands and mouth busy with something, like whenever I wanted a cigarette I'd eat a carrot instead. Totally helped.

Now I only need to find a way to kick my carrot addiction :P

Alex Bakke
11-12-2011, 09:53 PM
I've quit 2 months ago after 3 years of pack per day smoking. I've quit cold turkey and the 1st two weeks where pretty shitty, intense cravings etc. What I've found helpful is to keep your hands and mouth busy with something, like whenever I wanted a cigarette I'd eat a carrot instead. Totally helped.

Now I only need to find a way to kick my carrot addiction :P

Why, using cigarettes of course!