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View Full Version : Turn-based in real-time (just the facts, ma'am)



thegooseking
17-01-2012, 07:52 AM
Can anyone help me, please? Anyone have any links to good technical articles about games that are turn-based under the hood but appear somewhat real-time to the player (e.g. old Bioware RPGs)? It might be useful for my PhD.

mike2R
17-01-2012, 11:14 AM
Edit: sigh, really must read posts better before replying. Sorry, no technical articles, just suggestions of games.

Possibly the Dragon Age games? While since I played them so I can't really remember if they have actual turns like the Baldurs Gate type games, or are just pausable real time. Same on the UFO After* series - pausable realtime but I *think* there was a "pause on end of turn" option... may be my memory playing tricks though, it has been a while.

On firmer ground, Paradox grand strategy games - Crusader Kings, Europa Universalis series, Victoria series and Hearts of Iron series. They have turns a day long (or an hour for Hearts of Iron games), but the player just lets these roll by and can pause the game at any point.

IDtenT
17-01-2012, 11:29 AM
On firmer ground, Paradox grand strategy games - Crusader Kings, Europa Universalis series, Victoria series and Hearts of Iron series. They have turns a day long (or an hour for Hearts of Iron games), but the player just lets these roll by and can pause the game at any point.
This. Pretty much the only games that do it correctly, imho. It's mini turns of a sort.

Lektor
17-01-2012, 11:39 AM
X-Com Apocalypse might also have a system to this, though im not sure.

Rii
17-01-2012, 12:01 PM
Isn't everything turn-based under the hood?

i.e. a game will resolve all actions occurring within a given frame simultaneously, where each frame is x/100ths-of-a-second in duration. A couple examples from memory: Counter-Strike resolves (or can be set to resolve) 100 times per second whereas Starcraft II resolves 32 times per second. In all cases there is a finite temporal resolution to the simulation.

EDIT: Actually multiplayer RTS is really interesting cos they don't send the entire world state but rather only the series of player inputs to simulations operating independently on each client, kinda like inertial guidance systems.The fun begins when the simulations disagree with one another.