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Berzee
23-01-2012, 05:16 PM
I'm looking for some good examples so as to inspire something I'm working on. =) Let me clarify what I'm seeking:

I don't mean games like Roguelikes or STALKER or the like, where you can have random encounters that make up a good story for you to remember and tell later. Those are fun but not what I'm looking for here. ;)

I mean the kind of game where you (for example) have to do a favor for somebody in order to get their help, but the quest and the text describing it could be different every time, such that on one playthrough you might be asked to track down a kidnapper, or to find a buried treasure, or to fight a gang.

And if you're asked to fight a gang, it might be a gang of thugs or it might be a gang of bees, and it might be in an alleyway or perhaps in the forest. And when you go to fight them they might fight, or they might run, or they might negotiate. And if you reload, it will probably happen differently.

Can anyone think of any game like this that actually generates randomized but coherent narratives? Something like what Skyrim does with its "Radiant Story" but...good. And meaningful.

I suspect there must be a few such experiments out there. And I know that this kind of system won't generate a Good Story when compared to ones written entirely by a human being; but I'm still interested. =)

Thanks!

Anthile
23-01-2012, 05:23 PM
Din's Curse?

Drake Sigar
23-01-2012, 05:24 PM
Err, MDickie's Wrestling Mpire 2008? (Any edition) Pretty much has all the things you asked for.

Smashbox
23-01-2012, 05:28 PM
I can't give any concrete examples off the top of my head, but here are a few cool articles related to your request that might help to get the creative juices flowing. These are more of a theoretical outline for how you could effectively break down the steps necessary to conceive of procedurally generating compelling content. I did not make these.



Environment Tree (http://www.squidi.net/three/entry.php?id=4)




http://www.squidi.net/three/poster/poster004.png (http://www.squidi.net/three/entry.php?id=4)
(http://www.squidi.net/three/entry.php?id=4)
A method for generating puzzles and locked doors without worrying about unwinnable situations based on modelling the environment as a tree. (http://www.squidi.net/three/entry.php?id=4)





PGC Templates (http://www.squidi.net/three/entry.php?id=37)




http://www.squidi.net/three/poster/poster037.png (http://www.squidi.net/three/entry.php?id=37)
(http://www.squidi.net/three/entry.php?id=37)
Posted: 06/14/07

An explicit way to define and control random decisions in relationship to a particular algorithm. (http://www.squidi.net/three/entry.php?id=37)









PGC Cards #1

(http://www.squidi.net/three/entry.php?id=57)




http://www.squidi.net/three/poster/poster057.png (http://www.squidi.net/three/entry.php?id=57)
(http://www.squidi.net/three/entry.php?id=57)
Posted: 10/11/07

A way to organize and expose the procedural generation concept to the player. Part 1. (http://www.squidi.net/three/entry.php?id=57)



(http://www.squidi.net/three/entry.php?id=54)

PGC World (http://www.squidi.net/three/entry.php?id=54)




http://www.squidi.net/three/poster/poster054.png (http://www.squidi.net/three/entry.php?id=54)
(http://www.squidi.net/three/entry.php?id=54)
Posted: 08/20/07

A technique for building a logical overworld for a procedurally generated RPG. (http://www.squidi.net/three/entry.php?id=54)

Unaco
23-01-2012, 05:32 PM
Mount & Blade: Warband. May not be quite what you mean, but for producing emergent, dynamic and unique stories, it's fantastic.

vinraith
23-01-2012, 06:04 PM
Din's Curse?

My thought exactly. Don't neglect the excellent expansion, either.

Vexing Vision
23-01-2012, 06:26 PM
Every time you generate a world for Dwarf Fortress, it comes complete with newly generated myths and legends based on actual events a thousand years before the playtime.

I LOVE the world generator of Dwarf Fortress. It's the most kick-ass thing for world and lore generation ever.

Lambchops
23-01-2012, 10:28 PM
I mean the kind of game where you (for example) have to do a favor for somebody in order to get their help, but the quest and the text describing it could be different every time, such that on one playthrough you might be asked to track down a kidnapper, or to find a buried treasure, or to fight a gang.

And if you're asked to fight a gang, it might be a gang of thugs or it might be a gang of bees, and it might be in an alleyway or perhaps in the forest. And when you go to fight them they might fight, or they might run, or they might negotiate. And if you reload, it will probably happen differently.

Can anyone think of any game like this that actually generates randomized but coherent narratives? Something like what Skyrim does with its "Radiant Story" but...good. And meaningful.

Flotilla (http://www.blendogames.com/flotilla/) springs immediately to mind. I'd perhaps not go as far to say that it results in meaningful stories, or indeed ones that are "good" in terms of narrative flow. But they are certainly "good" in terms of charm and humour and definitely are meaningful in the sense that they flesh out and give you a reason why you are having a turn based battle with a fleet of spaceships. Especially when they are eccentrically named penguin pirates who you've antagonised for some gloriously frivolous reason. I'm sure there was a good interview with Brendan Chung from Blendo about the game in one of the recent Sunday Papers but I can't remember where.

---

Looking at things from a different angle (I feel Flotilla is a closer match to the type of thing you are interested in) there's also games like Masq (http://www.alteraction.com/), which has a very coherent story presented with an absolute ton of branches meaning that it can not only end in a lot of different ways but take a completely different path altogether and feel like a different story in later acts (though the first act is always broadly similar). It obviously limits the stylistic choices that can be made (for example i couldn't imagine someone putting something with so many branches into a full 3D game, the graphic novel style is pretty much required to make it possible I would expect). It definitely impressed me back when I played it, even lots of simple things like having doing nothing (whether through choice or good old fashioned indecision) actually had an affect on the story, making it feel much more organic and like being in an actual conversation. Obviously it isn't random in the sense that you were asking about it the topic but it's a different (and exceptionally time consuming) way of going about giving that illusion.

That's all from the top of my head, I'm sure I'm forgetting something else though . . . it'll come to me or someone else will mention it!

Bison
24-01-2012, 12:39 AM
My thought exactly. Don't neglect the excellent expansion, either.

I could never get the expansion to install correctly. Great game anyway. Same with Depths of Peril.

Matzerath
24-01-2012, 05:16 AM
Adam Ryland, who I guess is primarily known for stat-crazy pro-wrestling simulations, MMA, and such, recently released a superhero game in the same style, 'Comic Book Hero'. Basically you build or pick a hero and then proceed to do any number of hero activities, from joining a league to trolling the streets for trouble to doing public relations stuff. You can make enemies, have relationships, get into elaborate fights, and also get seriously injured or lose your sanity. There are a HUGE number of factors that make every game different as you build 'issues' of your comic series. The presentation is very bare bones, but the rest of it fits what you're looking for, if you're willing to sacrifice Skyrim looks for truly varied gameplay (and it's pretty much one or the other at this stage of computer games).
Here's the demo:
http://www.greydogsoftware.com/index.php?page=demos
Here's a review of the game:
http://justpressstart.net/?p=5307


(http://justpressstart.net/?p=5307)

Caleb367
24-01-2012, 01:14 PM
First three that come to mind, Dwarf Fortress, Dwarf Fortress, and Dwarf Fortress.

Rinox
24-01-2012, 03:09 PM
First three that come to mind, Dwarf Fortress, Dwarf Fortress, and Dwarf Fortress.

Yep. Also want to add Football Manager to that esteemed list.

Caleb367
24-01-2012, 04:15 PM
Yep. Also want to add Football Manager to that esteemed list.
Now I want to play football with rabid drunk dwarves.
*Urist McCentre interrupts Pass: Stricken by mood.*

Pseudo310
24-01-2012, 04:59 PM
Now I want to play football with rabid drunk dwarves.

Blood Bowl!

As an aside, this thread has introduced me to the MDickie games. Quite fun, though I'm yearning for a manual.