PDA

View Full Version : I need to stop buying games. Advice?



thegooseking
16-06-2011, 03:48 PM
Recently I've been buying games faster than I can play them. I have a rather significant backlog, partly because of all the sales on which I've said "Sure, why not?" and partly because I don't have as much time to play as I'd like now that I'm getting (even more) serious with my PhD.

Buying all these games isn't exactly putting me in the poor house, but I did have a wonderful time in Canada last month and want to save money to go back there soon, and buying all these games is somewhat interfering with that.

Obviously there are some games I will have to buy (like Deus Ex), but other than a (very) few select definite purchases, I don't want to buy too many other games. Anyone have any advice for how I can resist the lure?

Kadayi
16-06-2011, 04:08 PM
Split your Steam games down into categories that suit you, for example I have 4; Finished, To Play, To Explore & and To Replay. It gives me a clear idea of what games I've got in my backlog and an idea of how I might approach them in terms of sequence, as well as titles I dip back into.

Tikey
16-06-2011, 04:13 PM
Make a list of games you want and set up a maximum price you're willing to pay for each game. That's going to help you with the known stuff.
The little surprises are the problem. "Oh someone said this indie game I've never heared before is great I should try it". My take is if I'm interested I'll buy them NEXT time they're on sale, that way I make sure the interest is something genuine (or if I find out I'm REALLY intersted I'll buy them when I have the chance.)

I don't buy many games mostly because I don't have a credit card and I rely on friend to buy things for me, so the hassle makes me thing each purchase carefully as I can't bother them all the time.
The moment I get a credit card I'm doomed.

imirk
16-06-2011, 04:14 PM
Tell yourself that you will buy it later, then later comes and it is not on sale, so you tell your self well next time it is on sale I will buy it, then when it goes on sale you tell yourself that you will buy it later. Procrastination is a money saving technique.

Jams O'Donnell
16-06-2011, 04:15 PM
Obviously there are some games I will have to buy (like Deus Ex), but other than a (very) few select definite purchases, I don't want to buy too many other games. Anyone have any advice for how I can resist the lure?
Wait a little bit to buy new games. For example, I picked up Portal 2 when it came out at full price and haven't had time to play much of it yet. It's now often available for about 15. That'll save you some cash.

wcaypahwat
16-06-2011, 04:15 PM
Tell yourself you can get it later, and cheaper. Play/replay older games. Depending on if you own any other systems, trade in some stuff you don't use anymore.

It is hard, I've been there. You just gotta roll up that magazine, smack yourself on the nose and say "NO!"

Ian
16-06-2011, 04:23 PM
I have this issue. Dunno if you're anything like me but I find one thing is to be honest when you've had your fill of a game. I used to sometimes end up not playing anything foir weeks because I thought, "Well, I ought to go and finish [game]". Especially if you've got stuff mega-cheap from sales it's much easier to get value for money for a game you're less keen on. And I'm not saying to not give games a chance, just that if you decide you genuinely don't want to play any more of a game then accept that and move onto something you feel like playing.

duff
16-06-2011, 04:42 PM
Unleash the inner gamer beast. There can be no restraint.

EDIT: Actually, every time I go into ASDA L.A Noire and Dirt 3 are sat there flaunting their juicy bits at me. Quite pleased with myself I've managed to walk away. I think the real area I struggle is Steam, it has my credit card details stored so all I have to do is click purchase and the dirty little deed is done, and I'm left alone in the shower trying to scrub it all away.

DarkNoghri
16-06-2011, 04:56 PM
Tell yourself that you will buy it later, then later comes and it is not on sale, so you tell your self well next time it is on sale I will buy it, then when it goes on sale you tell yourself that you will buy it later. Procrastination is a money saving technique.

This is actually what I do half the time. Either I'm not interested (and don't buy it), I'm really interested (and I buy it), or I'm semi-interested, in which case I either buy it or I feel too lazy and put it off until later, forget, and go to bed. Which, based off of what my schedule has been recently, usually means I'm not at my computer by the time the Steam sales wore off/switched over.

ColOfNature
16-06-2011, 05:49 PM
Delete your credit card info from Steam - less chance of those impulse buys.

Wizardry
16-06-2011, 06:41 PM
Learn that there is enough abandonware out there to last you a lifetime.

westyfield
16-06-2011, 09:44 PM
Delete your credit card info from Steam - less chance of those impulse buys.

This. It's more secure, and the time it takes you to grab your card and type the details in is enough time to stop and consider whether you really can afford - or actually need - whatever you're buying.

Kadayi
16-06-2011, 11:37 PM
Look at your gaming history and which SP games you finished Vs which games you didn't. Pretty soon you'll see patterns emerging of the genres you actually like, Vs the genres you think you'd like. If an upcoming game doesn't fall into the likely to finish camp then you know that in all likelihood you can safely bypass it.

Personally I was convinced I liked RTS having played Shogun TW & C&C/RA back in the day but with both Starcraft 2 and Shogun 2 sat on my hard drive untouched it's fair to say that I'm confident I don't need to buy the upcoming Starcraft expansion.

Gerbick
16-06-2011, 11:57 PM
I've found the most effective way is to have kids and a job that doesn't pay that well.

icupnimpn2
17-06-2011, 01:44 AM
Learn that there is enough abandonware out there to last you a lifetime.

you understand that abandonware isn't a thing, right?

The JG Man
17-06-2011, 03:29 AM
Really just building on what other people have said:

-Wait till after a game has released. If you really want it, you'll remember to pick it up in a sale.
-Just because a title is on sale, it doesn't mean you have to get it. Be as sure as possible that you absolutely want it. Look around, review reviews, see if there are any in-depth gameplay videos (TotalBiscuit or Giantbomb?) and if you can be interested enough to watch through those videos and really want to play it, THEN go for it.
-Get engaged with one game at a time. If you sink your teeth into one, you'll likely be focused on it too much to care about other content. This doesn't mean to say you can't say have a multi-player game at the same time. Perhaps you could limit the amount of time you spend on an MP game a week?
-Play through a game in sessions, but if you start getting bored, stop. Just because you've bought it doesn't mean you have to complete it to justify it. Sometimes you just end up making crappy choices and end up getting a game you don't want. Forcing yourself through that will mean it'll take longer to play, your interest will be elsewhere so you'll probably pick up other titles. Not to mention games are supposed to be fun, so don't not have fun.
-Provide yourself with a monthly allowance on games. If you run out, it's not like the game will no longer be obtainable. If it's on sale, don't worry; if its been on sale once, it'll probably go on sale again.
-Make a list of games you want and those you want when they go on sale and then do not get anything outside of this. Be ruthless on the list.

Personally, I'm a big fan of the burning through games one at a time. I did this at the beginning of the year and over the course of a month completed Alan Wake, Assassin's Creed 2 and Red Dead Redemption (no MP and didn't go for all the achievements because bloody hell that's a MASSIVE game) while still having time for uni work, socialising and BC2 MP on the side.

I feel like I'm getting into the same boat as you though. After getting this new gaming PC, I ended up indulging on the Steam sales a bit too much. I now have VVVVVV, Torchlight, DiRT 3, Crysis + Warhead and DoW2 Retribution's SP all to finish, because I've started them all. That also doesn't include Aquaria, Gish, Lugaru, Penumbra, Samofrost 2 and World of Goo from the first humble indie bundle which I've yet to start on ANY of them. Fortunately, my summer has just begun...

Best of luck!

Vexing Vision
17-06-2011, 09:08 AM
Nosense. Support the gaming industry! Buy the games you like the sound of, so that more devs will go and make these games!


That said, I have the same problem with boardgames. In the last year, I spent several hundreds of Euros on an Eldar Warhammer 40k army that I'll play once every two years.... But they were so shiny!

riadsala
17-06-2011, 10:38 AM
I used to be like you, but I managed to quit the new game cycle. As, a) I have a sill backlog, (partly as I like big Strat games that take an age to play), and b) I realised that most new games aren't actually any better than the ones I have already. Sure, they may have nicer graphics, but that just means they won't run as well on my PC.

New games are still tempting, and I pick things up when they're too cheap to resist (like The TW: Emp + Nappy for <10 deal). But I've realised that new games don't actually make me happy. Well, they do for a bit, but then the newness shine wears off.

Cable
17-06-2011, 01:00 PM
I also sort of have this problem but have managed to cut back with having a list and stuff so managing to get through my backlog a bit.
Also just wanted to say yay for eldar! i think pretty much all mine are still unpainted and i only play with them occassionally but they are just so pretty

deano2099
17-06-2011, 02:34 PM
Piracy!

No but seriously... if you're not 100% morally opposed to it, it can help with the mindset somewhat. As in, I don't need to buy this game that's 50% off in the Steam sale today, just in case I get the urge to play it over the next three months, because if that really does happen I could always pirate and then buy when it's next on sale. I find the reality is that I never do, but knowing that you could removes that "must buy now" impulse.

The JG Man
17-06-2011, 03:34 PM
It's not just the payment though of games. Putting aside my feelings on piracy, the issue stems from just the collection of uncompleted games. Piracy just adds to that collection as opposed to slowing it down or finding an alternative solution.

DarkTAO
17-06-2011, 03:54 PM
I know how you feel.. in the past 6 months I've taken my Steam account from nothing to a 600GB folder on my HDD... I still have games I haven't installed.. I can't passup the steam sales though on games I want for 75% off.. :/

deano2099
17-06-2011, 05:39 PM
It's not just the payment though of games. Putting aside my feelings on piracy, the issue stems from just the collection of uncompleted games. Piracy just adds to that collection as opposed to slowing it down or finding an alternative solution.

Sort of. But it does that to a degree that makes it cease to be an issue. If you are open to piracy, you know that as long as you have an internet connection, you can play any game you want from the history of gaming whenever you want. Your 'collection' is infinitely large. And so ownership becomes somewhat irrelevant. So instead you choose what to play based on what you want to play. I find in my case, that means 99% of the time I buy it, as either I want it enough I want the spangly things that come with the boxed CE, or it's old enough it's less than ten quid to buy.

I'm not saying 'start pirating stuff' - just being open to that possibility means you no longer feel compelled to buy games as soon as they're out or on sale, unless you really want to play them right away.

kyrieee
18-06-2011, 12:31 AM
The first thing you can do is use this to calculate how much your games are worth since it's probably more than you think:
www.steamcalculator.com (http://www.steamcalculator.com)

After using that calc and also getting another wake up call in the form of buying the same game more than once on different DD platforms because I didn't remember that I'd already bought it (never played it), the next step for me was to only buy games that I wanted to play right now. If I'm not going to download and play it right as a buy it then I don't buy it. No buying because it's on sale and I can play it later. You save money by buying games for a higher price but actually playing all the stuff you buy.

ColOfNature
18-06-2011, 01:07 AM
The problem with SteamCalculator and its ilk is that it works on full retail price. Fine for bragging rights, but I rarely buy a game on Steam at full price. It says I've got a grand's worth of games - I'd guess I've spent maybe half of that. Still a lot I know, but not quite as bad as it seemed at first blush.

Vexing Vision
18-06-2011, 12:29 PM
I'm not saying 'start pirating stuff' - just being open to that possibility means you no longer feel compelled to buy games as soon as they're out or on sale, unless you really want to play them right away.

It's amazing how much money you save when considering stealing luxury articles, too. Of course, I don't need to drink a bottle of 40€ wine, but if I'm open to stealing it, it wouldn't cost me a thing. That is awesome.

Sorry, pet peeve.

thegooseking
18-06-2011, 01:14 PM
I guess I'm a hypocrite about piracy. The games industry wants to tell us that buying games used is as bad as piracy, therefore I only pirate when my only other alternative is to buy it used (that is, when it's not even for sale new; not just when I can't afford it). I think that's a reasonable position (if you don't want to take my money, you can't really complain when I don't give it to you), but it's only consistent if I don't buy used games when I have the option of buying them new. Which I do, sometimes.

Kadayi
18-06-2011, 01:48 PM
It's amazing how much money you save when considering stealing luxury articles, too. Of course, I don't need to drink a bottle of 40€ wine, but if I'm open to stealing it, it wouldn't cost me a thing. That is awesome.

Sorry, pet peeve.

Agreed. Games are not an essential, they are a luxury item. I don't have much tolerance for piracy promotion either tbh. Unlike Films or TV shows there's little if any likelihood of follow through sales after the experience (such as DVD purchases for example), as the vast majority of gamers rarely finish games, let alone replay them. Plus there are plenty of cheap games out there, and lets face it we all have enormous back catalogues of titles to play these days. If you're not prepared to pay the going price point on a game wait a few months and buy it when invariably it comes down in price, or man up and cut something else out of your life so you can afford it. The ability to show restraint, and to make sacrifice is what separates us from the animals.

deano2099
18-06-2011, 03:54 PM
Plus there are plenty of cheap games out there, and lets face it we all have enormous back catalogues of titles to play these days. If you're not prepared to pay the going price point on a game wait a few months and buy it when invariably it comes down in price, or man up and cut something else out of your life so you can afford it.

EXACTLY. Maybe you should read the thread before posting, as you're so keen to tell other people.

The OP spends loads of money on games and has that huge back catalogue of unplayed stuff and wants help to stop himself buying more and more games.

I am simply pointing out an awareness that any game you ever want to play or might want to play is available for free and a few hours downloading through piracy can help you escape the mindset of "I MUST OWN THIS NOW even though I won't play it for 18 months if ever".

This isn't a piracy debate. You're telling me piracy is wrong and you shouldn't do it. I AGREE. So have fun arguing with thin air. But if you accept that it exists, that it's commonplace, that loads of people do it, and you could do if you want, you begin to realise how pointless the concept of needing to own games is. And rather than just buying because it's new or on sale, you instead see what game you want to play at any given moment and then make the choice: buy, pirate, or go without. If like the OP you've got a fair amount of disposable income, 99% of the time you'll do the first one anyway. And you'll save yourself money in the long run.

deano2099
18-06-2011, 03:59 PM
It's amazing how much money you save when considering stealing luxury articles, too. Of course, I don't need to drink a bottle of 40€ wine, but if I'm open to stealing it, it wouldn't cost me a thing. That is awesome.

Sorry, pet peeve.

Not sure what the pet peeve is?

Your analogy is a little confused: it'd be like if you had a cellar full of 40euro wine, and a new 40euro wine came out that looked interesting. Your initial thought might be "ooh, that looks interesting, I want to add that my cellar, I'll buy it".

However, if you had access to a button that would magic any wine ever made directly on to your dinner table then you wouldn't need to keep all that stuff in your cellar. If the option is there, you might also well choose to pay for that wine when you pressed the button.

The whole thing is more about availability than money in this debate. Ease of access. The only reason the 'getting it for free' element of piracy even enters in to it is because of the prevalence of time-limited sales in the market.

theweirdn8
20-06-2011, 10:40 AM
Heres an idea, beat the games you have, then go buy some more.

Vexing Vision
20-06-2011, 05:33 PM
Not sure what the pet peeve is?


To call "piracy" theft. An "open mind" to piracy is to endorse theft. Theft of luxury articles.

People who pirate games are people who eat at a restaurant and then run away before paying the bill, does that work better for you?


Anyway! Not going to make more comments on that, back to the topic!

If you have the money, buy the games you like, if only to support the developers. Then, gift them via the RPS Kindness thread. Problem solved!

deano2099
20-06-2011, 06:09 PM
To call "piracy" theft. An "open mind" to piracy is to endorse theft. Theft of luxury articles.

People who pirate games are people who eat at a restaurant and then run away before paying the bill, does that work better for you?


Fair enough. It's a pet peeve of mine when people call piracy theft to be honest. But then, you know all the reasons why it isn't, and why it's obviously different but you choose to equate things on a moral rather than literal level, which is your choice. I don't call piracy 'theft' for the same reason I don't call bad things 'gay', it's not about piracy for me it's about grammar.

But to be honest my point still stands, it'd work the same for other things, just you're more likely to get caught so it's not a feasible option. Also, having an open mind to something is in no way endorsing it. I'm open minded to religion and faith but I don't practice that either.