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westyfield
21-06-2011, 04:54 PM
A place to assert your superiority and recommend your favourite way of making tea to the rest of RPS.
Should tea have milk in? What about sugar? Perhaps you make tea with - *shudder* - teabags?
Is dunking acceptable? What do you dunk? Tell us!


I'll start:
My family buys and drinks Waitrose gold blend, which I don't mind, but when I make tea I prefer to use Guv'nors blend - a mixture of Assam and Darjeeling from Gillards in Bath. It's slightly less bitter and more fragrant, but needs to brew for longer.
Loose leaf for life and milk goes in first. YES IT DOES.
I'm also partial to the occasional cup of Earl Grey, Lapsang Souchong or Honeybush, but Guv'nors is my go-to infusion of choice.

How about you?

Jams O'Donnell
21-06-2011, 05:17 PM
Teabag, in the mug, with hot water. No milk, no sugar. Leave the old bag in and refill with an additional new bag. Hero tea.

Which is not to say that I'm a tea heathen -- I like a fancypants loose tea when I can be bothered, but my infuser likes to spill tea everywhere.

I tend to drink Twinings' Earl Grey, mostly because you can find it everywhere. However, I'm also partial to roasted teas like lapsang souchong, hoji cha, and genmai cha. As for loose tea brands, when I lived in the US I used Republic of Tea but I can't find anywhere I can get the m in the UK without paying £££ for shipping. When I lived in the US I lived in Chicago, and there's a wonderful chain of tea shops there called Argo (http://www.argotea.com/) who do the best mate you'll taste, because it's made with cocoa.

Here in Edinburgh there's a tea place I keep meaning to try but haven't gotten round to because I'm too lazy to use an infuser most of the time called Eteaket (http://www.eteaket.co.uk/) (why must tea shops have stupid puns in their names all the time?), which looks like it has tasty things. Caramel rooibois? Yes please.

I drink my tea black and unsweetened mostly out of laziness. If I'm out on a hike I'm always looking forwards to getting to a pub or cafe at the end and having some proper tea with milk and sugar.

Coffee has no place in my life.

Ian
21-06-2011, 05:25 PM
I don't like tea. :( Tried it years ago and didn't like it. Tried again recently to the same result.

Well, I say "don't like". I've just never thought it tasted enough of anything to be worth the bother of making it and the caffeine. Perhaps I've only tried crap tea?

Donjo
21-06-2011, 05:42 PM
Any kind of common or garden black tea, bit of milk and a quarter spoon of sugar for me. I like it lazy and frequent. Just had a nice cup with a few chocolate digestives there. Might go for another right now.

wcaypahwat
21-06-2011, 06:03 PM
The only tea I enjoy is the chinese stuff. No idea what any of them are called, because I can't read the packaging.

Yes, I'm a coffee drinking heathen. shh!

JayTee
21-06-2011, 06:09 PM
Pretty much buy all my tea from Char in Winchester (http://www.charteas.com/) in loose-leaf form.

Outside of my love of loose-leaf tea, I really only like Tetley Tea.

White no sugar please. Oh and if you've got chocolate hobnobs I might love you forever.

Colonel J
21-06-2011, 06:50 PM
http://img638.imageshack.us/img638/1253/teacaddy03smaller.jpg (http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/638/teacaddy03smaller.jpg/)

President Weasel
21-06-2011, 06:52 PM
Milk goes in first when you are not making a standalone mug of tea using a teabag in the mug. If the teabag is in the mug, the boiling water goes in first, then the tea is allowed to brew, then the teabag is removed, and then and only then may the milk be added.
I have seen with my own eyes people (well, I'll call them people) place the teabag in the mug, add a splash of milk, leave the teabag standing in the cold milk, wait for the kettle to boil, and then add the hot water.

SMiD
21-06-2011, 06:58 PM
I have seen with my own eyes people (well, I'll call them people) place the teabag in the mug, add a splash of milk, leave the teabag standing in the cold milk, wait for the kettle to boil, and then add the hot water.

Monsters, all of them!

I'm partial to a nice cup of Earl Grey myself.

squareking
21-06-2011, 07:04 PM
Another Twinings Earl Grey drinker, mostly because it's ubiquitous and delicious. Generally don't take milk nor sugar, though honey and green tea is akin to soul food for me. I love almost everything, except for the frou-frou fruity herby blends. I had some sorta white/mango tea once. Once.

All I've got at work is Bigelow Plantation Mint -- it'll have to do. Fiancee and I recently bought some loose green tea from Teavana...it's heavenly.

Colonel J
21-06-2011, 07:04 PM
I suspect that this place could not exist without tea.

The Rossignol hivemind's HUD has a tea meter instead of a life bar.

laneford
21-06-2011, 07:44 PM
http://img638.imageshack.us/img638/1253/teacaddy03smaller.jpg (http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/638/teacaddy03smaller.jpg/)

Have you tried their Fruit Tea? It is WONDROUS ALSO.

Kadayi
21-06-2011, 07:48 PM
Really into English breakfast atm, though I do like the old lapsang Souchong occasionally (much to the bemusement of my work colleagues).

As regards the milk conundrum. Milk definitely after the hot water has gone in so you can press the teabag till you achieve the appropriate tan shade of your liking. As a rule I tend to let the water cool from boiling for a minute or so before adding it, as I think when it's boiling it tends to kill the flavour.

OT but with instant Coffee, add milk first and blend into a paste, then add the water (again about a minute off the boil) that way you don't scorch the outside of the granules and thus avoid that awful bitterness you tend to get with instant coffee. Try it, you'll be pleasantly surprised.

Lambchops
21-06-2011, 07:49 PM
Milk goes in first when you are not making a standalone mug of tea using a teabag in the mug. If the teabag is in the mug, the boiling water goes in first, then the tea is allowed to brew, then the teabag is removed, and then and only then may the milk be added.


Weasel has it spot on here. Also when making a brew in a teapot I'm in the habit of pre warming the teapot (because that's the way my mother told me to do it and as we all should realise, mother knows best).

I used to defile my tea with sugar but I soon grew out of this uncouth habit. I still buy shit teabags though, I'm still a student after all!

KauhuK
21-06-2011, 07:58 PM
I like black tea but sometimes brew green or roibos. I use mostly loose leaf teas and English Breakfeast and Assam are my favourites. Of course I'll add some sugar and milk for black tea. There are other blends I use but dont remember their names.

TheLastBaron
21-06-2011, 07:58 PM
I'm quite fond of Golden Money myself, but English Breakfast is still my standard go-to tea.

Donjo
21-06-2011, 08:20 PM
God I love tea.

NecroKnight
21-06-2011, 09:28 PM
I usually drink Earl Grey & some other brands (I didn't remember their exact names). I love mint tea beacuse it tastes different, delicious and leaves you with an feeling of freshness in your mouth. I don't add milk to my tea (it's just seems so strange) and neither sugar. I prefer to add honey.

Unpleasant Scott
21-06-2011, 09:52 PM
Yuck!

I'm clearly in the minority though, I can't even stand the smell of the stuff.

Not having any in the house does have disadvantages in terms of entertaining guests.

'Do you mind if I make some tea?'

'Um, you can try.'

TillEulenspiegel
21-06-2011, 10:10 PM
Another vote for Twinings Earl Grey, though I'll occasionally grab a box of PG Tips to mix it up. Bit of whole milk, bit of sugar or orange blossom honey.

I saw "make us a brew!" when I was in London and was very tempted to smuggle some back home, but alas, not enough space. Next time.

KingCathcart
21-06-2011, 10:22 PM
(PG tips/Tetley/any sort of supermarket red label) + Hot Water + (Sugar X 2) + Milk.
As per Weasel's mug method.

Colonel J
21-06-2011, 10:50 PM
(PG tips/Tetley/any sort of supermarket red label) + Hot Water + (Sugar X 2) + Milk.
As per Weasel's mug method.

NATO standard, in other words.

Kablooie
21-06-2011, 11:54 PM
You brits and your tea. Gimme a strong cup of coffee early in the morning, or afternoon . . . . . oh yes. Coffee and a cigarette, breakfast of champions.

Nice scones, though. With clotted cream, lovely.

Breakfast in Edinburgh. Runny eggs, bacon that's stuck together in big clumps. Some kind of odd objects looking like hockey pucks. Black, small, round.
.
"What's that?"
"Blood pudding"
"urrghhhhhh . . . "

Breakfast was a cup of coffee that morning.

vinraith
22-06-2011, 01:40 AM
I have a cabinet full of tea, I like a lot of variety. For loose, I have an infuser pot and some filter bags, depending on whether I want a pot or a cup. Particular favorites from my local purveyor of quality loose tea are their Earl Gray, a couple of local blends, and blueberry green oolong. I also have an online store that sells some Sri Lankan and Chinese blends, I'm particularly patial to Adawatte Pekoe.

All that said, I'm not opposed to bags either. Republic of Tea has some good stuff, and obviously bags are quicker and more convenient. My favorite bagged tea at the moment is Harney and Sons Hot Cinnamon Spice, which is basically a cup of dessert. Delcious, delicious dessert.

Oh, and as to how I take it, with raw sugar when I can get it, regular sugar if not. Milk is reserved for unflavored black tea, and tea I've managed to oversteep into bitterness.

duff
22-06-2011, 01:58 AM
I dont drink tea or coffee, but literally gallons of Robinsons fruit and barley concentrate.

sinomatic
22-06-2011, 02:35 AM
You brits and your tea. Gimme a strong cup of coffee early in the morning, or afternoon . . . . .

I essentially live on coffee, however there are places that coffee can't even begin to reach that a hot cup of tea will.

And I'm not all that fussy with my tea drinking; a standard tea brand will do me fine as long as its brewed nice and strong and isn't too "flowery" tasting, which some teas can tend toward.

Ooo, and jasmine tea. I love jasmine tea. (And yes, I'm aware that IS flowery, but its flowery on purpose and isn't anything like normal tea).

outoffeelinsobad
22-06-2011, 02:39 AM
For me, nothing beats vanilla chai with a bit of soy milk and sugar. Unless maybe it's an Ethiopian blend of coffee.

vinraith
22-06-2011, 02:49 AM
Speaking of the tea/coffee argument, I neglected to mention my local tea proprietor's "Mayan Blend" which is basically 1/3 breakfast tea, 1/3 yerba mate, and 1/3 coffee. It's freaking delicious, and it'll wake you up in the morning.

SMiD
22-06-2011, 03:20 AM
Speaking of the tea/coffee argument, I neglected to mention my local tea proprietor's "Mayan Blend" which is basically 1/3 breakfast tea, 1/3 yerba mate, and 1/3 coffee. It's freaking delicious, and it'll wake you up in the morning.

That sounds amazing. I must search this blend out.

TheLastBaron
22-06-2011, 04:02 AM
I personally prefer tea over coffee because after only drinking tea for so long a cup of coffee leaves me feeling like I just smoked a couple rocks of crystal meth, and also I prefer the taste of tea.

SeanybabeS
22-06-2011, 09:59 AM
Bit of a side step, has anyone tried growing their own tea?

Been looking at having a go at growing some Camellia sinensis but apparently it's a rather difficult process without a greenhouse.

Jams O'Donnell
22-06-2011, 10:10 AM
Bit of a side step, has anyone tried growing their own tea?

Been looking at having a go at growing some Camellia sinensis but apparently it's a rather difficult process without a greenhouse.
Oh my goodness, that sounds like a recipe for disaster/sadness in the UK. Good luck.

westyfield
22-06-2011, 01:05 PM
Speaking of the tea/coffee argument, I neglected to mention my local tea proprietor's "Mayan Blend" which is basically 1/3 breakfast tea, 1/3 yerba mate, and 1/3 coffee. It's freaking delicious, and it'll wake you up in the morning.

Sounds good! What's the name of the tea shop?

vinraith
22-06-2011, 03:44 PM
Sounds good! What's the name of the tea shop?

http://store02.prostores.com/servlet/shopzenteahouse/StoreFront

Skalpadda
22-06-2011, 04:39 PM
I'm from Sweden, which is very much a coffee culture (unless the Finns have passed us again we drink the most coffee per capita in the world). Tea drinking is often regarded with some amount of suspicion. I do however have a little cardboard box with bags allegedly containing "English Breakfast Tea", which I rather enjoy now and then.

Question: How do you go about heating the tea water? I've tried water in a mug and microwaving it, then adding the tea bag (or tea strainer, when I've been feeling fancy enough to buy loose tea), but there's something not quite right about that. I usually boil some water in a pot on the stove and then pour it into the mug, which for some reason seems to be a lot better.

TillEulenspiegel
22-06-2011, 04:53 PM
I do however have a little cardboard box with bags allegedly containing "English Breakfast Tea", which I rather enjoy now and then.
Germany produces similar things and they're universally awful. It's worth hunting down some real Twinings.

My life has been transformed by an electric kettle. Insert water, flick switch, a minute later it's boiled. Much more energy-efficient, though there's nothing wrong with a simple metal tea kettle on the stove either.

westyfield
22-06-2011, 05:14 PM
Question: How do you go about heating the tea water? I've tried water in a mug and microwaving it, then adding the tea bag (or tea strainer, when I've been feeling fancy enough to buy loose tea), but there's something not quite right about that. I usually boil some water in a pot on the stove and then pour it into the mug, which for some reason seems to be a lot better.

Do you not have a kettle? If not, heating water in a container on the stove and pouring it onto a teabag in a mug sounds like the best bet. Tea strainers and loose leaves are used with a teapot -you heat the water in a kettle or on the stove, put tea leaves in the pot, pour the boiling water onto leaves (it's best if the water is actually boiling as it goes in, unlike coffee). Then leave the tea to brew in the pot for a few minutes before pouring it through the strainer (to filter the leaves out) into a cup.
Also, be a bit careful with microwaving water - it can become superheated which is quite dangerous.


http://store02.prostores.com/servlet/shopzenteahouse/StoreFront

Thanks!

Alex Bakke
22-06-2011, 05:24 PM
I really, really enjoy drinking 'standard' tea, milk and sugar etc., but for some reason I never drink it at home. Only at friend's houses in the morning.

Oh! And Rooibos.

Colonel J
22-06-2011, 05:41 PM
Germany produces similar things and they're universally awful. It's worth hunting down some real Twinings.

My life has been transformed by an electric kettle. Insert water, flick switch, a minute later it's boiled. Much more energy-efficient, though there's nothing wrong with a simple metal tea kettle on the stove either.

I lived in Germany for a while and was always puzzled that not many people there used an electric kettle. This in the country where everyone has an electric egg boiler (what a brilliant invention I still use mine)

On German tea, my (British) girlfriend who grew up in Germany, she & her whole family all love Lipton Earl Grey, the tea leaves in a tin, they can't find it here so they buy it from Germany. I love Twinings Earl Grey but that Lipton stuff tastes like a piss-weak solution of a cleaning product.

Kablooie
22-06-2011, 07:57 PM
I can tell you, that for coffee, the best way to brew it is with forced steam. Period. Drip method can't touch it. I use an espresso maker, just don't load it up that strong, and it's wonderful.

Might try that with tea (?). Might be a worthwhile experiment, at least?

Anthile
22-06-2011, 10:18 PM
Saw this today:
http://i.imgur.com/CW61J.jpg

Do want, even though it's terribly gimmicky.

laneford
22-06-2011, 10:29 PM
"If you are cold, tea will warm you; if you are too heated, it will cool you; if you are depressed, it will cheer you; if you are excited, it will calm you" - Gladstone.

And I nicked that from a Twinings box.

Incidentally my new discovery is Clipper Fairtrade Assam and Vanilla, which sounds horrible but is in fact glorious.

sinomatic
23-06-2011, 01:53 AM
Let's open a kettle shop in Sweden.

outoffeelinsobad
23-06-2011, 09:46 AM
I can tell you, that for coffee, the best way to brew it is with forced steam. Period. Drip method can't touch it. I use an espresso maker, just don't load it up that strong, and it's wonderful.

Drip is lame, yes, but ze french press is even better than the espresso maker. Have you tried it?

Also, I found a rooibos with chocolate chips in it. Is this awesome? Y/N

Jams O'Donnell
23-06-2011, 10:00 AM
Saw this today:
Do want, even though it's terribly gimmicky.
http://store.yankodesign.com/media/catalog/product/cache/1/image/600x/b6c53eefddb148171814c2f11aa0d200/t/d/td_title-base.jpg
I'll see your shark, and raise you a diver: http://store.yankodesign.com/new-designs/tea-diver

Teddy Leach
23-06-2011, 11:28 AM
Put teabag in mug while kettle is boiling. When kettle is boiled, fill cup. Allow the tea to brew. Strain teabag with spoon before removing. Add dash of milk. Allow to cool slightly. Consume while stroking beard.

Alternatively, put tea-leaves into pre-warmed teapot or directly into mug. Pour boiling water into teapot or mug. If using mug, allow to brew then add dash of milk. If using teapot, allow to brew, pour into teapot, add dash of milk. Allow to cool slightly. Consume while stroking beard.

Jams O'Donnell
23-06-2011, 12:26 PM
My desk drawer:

http://jonathansutcliffe.com/files/tea.gif

The next drawer has two boxes of Killa Kans and some ibuprofen. Maybe some work stuff -- who knows?

tossrStu
23-06-2011, 11:10 PM
A heathen's guide to tea:

Email colleague to arrange to meet in kitchen. While waiting for her, put tebag (Yorkshire Gold) in mug, add a little milk and fill with hot water from boiler. Banter with colleague for 5 minutes. Squeeze teabag against side of mug with spoon, remove from mug and drop into organic waste bin. Return to desk and drink while staring incomprehendingly at whatever I'm supposed to be working on. Repeat process in about an hour's time.

Also:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eELH0ivexKA

Olero
24-06-2011, 10:48 AM
While I'm not that big a tea addict, my girlfriend is. That's why we have 3 drawers full of fresh (dried) tea leaves, herbs and mixtures. I rarely drink plain English blend tea because of this luxery. Though my current favorite isn't really a tea at all: Just slice a bit of ginger, chop it up into tiny (though not too tiny) bits and add hot boiling water --> delicious ginger "tea" ! Favourites beside that: Green tea with lemon grass, Rooibos chai and a mix called "weather and wind" (and yes, it's a silly name, since wind is part of the weather anyway)

We Dutch don't do milk in tea either, that tradition died with my grandparents death ;). And we also follow the Swedes and Finnish closely with our massive coffee consumption. Which I prefer made in a perculator, a great Italian invention!

Gerbick
25-06-2011, 11:52 AM
At home we (that's the wife, myself and out eldest daughter) drink Clipper Everyday Fairtrade tea. My wife won't touch any other tea at home, and always moans after visiting: "Their tea was horrid, you can tell it wasn't Clipper".

I also enjoy Mr Scruff's Mint & Chilli tea. Really refreshing.

apa
27-06-2011, 08:01 PM
I'm from Sweden, which is very much a coffee culture (unless the Finns have passed us again we drink the most coffee per capita in the world). Tea drinking is often regarded with some amount of suspicion.

It's as bad here. The coffee people sometimes even get annoyed and hostile toward the few of us tea drinkers.

Green tea for me, preferably with some extra flavour stuff but anything green goes. Black tea only if green is not available. But those Lipton teabags in yellow packaging are probably coffee drinkers evil plan against tea - that stuff is hideous.

imirk
27-06-2011, 11:57 PM
Lemon tea. No honey. Why do people like honey in tea!? It's better without. Someone back me up on this!

Honey is better than sugar

Zinfandel
29-06-2011, 09:03 AM
I put a small amount of milk in with the tea bag (See tea expert Guy Martin explaining emusion Vs Mixture) fill with boiling water, add sugar, add additional milk.

Lovely. I'm off to but the kettle on.

TheLastBaron
29-06-2011, 10:54 AM
Both are gross.
Agreed. I want to get a hot water tap next to my desk, nothing interrupts my gaming more than reaching for my mug only to find it empty. I could just keep a pound of English Breakfast and a glass of milk on my desk and potentially go all day.

Rossi
29-06-2011, 01:22 PM
I am a coffee and a tea drinker. Although, in the mornings I am mostly a coffee drinker. I am extremely festidious about the way my coffee is made and won't let anyone make it for me. The coffee at work is horrid so it requires precise amounts of coffee, water and milk for it to taste ok.

As for Tea I drink it fairly often but not as often as coffee, but a saying that a great mug of tea trumps the best coffee hands down. I'm just crap at making it.

sinister agent
29-06-2011, 06:44 PM
Clipper tea is an old favourite. Twinningses Assam is quite nice. Saisnbury's red label is lovely and can be bought in enormous quantities, but I haven't bought it for years.

Strong with a little milk. Weak and/or sugary tea is satan.

imirk
29-06-2011, 06:57 PM
I like Iced Tea, but not Sweet Tea, no dairy (cows are for eating not milking)

tossrStu
02-07-2011, 07:31 PM
I am a coffee and a tea drinker. Although, in the mornings I am mostly a coffee drinker. I am extremely festidious about the way my coffee is made and won't let anyone make it for me. The coffee at work is horrid so it requires precise amounts of coffee, water and milk for it to taste ok.

Oh, I only ever drink tea at work, because it gives me a legitimate reason to hang around the kitchen gassing for five minutes or so; when I'm at home it's coffee all the way, baby. On a lazy weekend morning I'll have a cafetiere of strong coffee with my breakfast, and in the afternoon I like to make a cappuccino with the frothy coffee maker, with a double shot of espresso and a few teaspoons of chocolate powder stirred in.

vinraith
26-07-2011, 08:40 PM
I have recently discovered that Kenya Milima Estate is one of my favorite black teas of all time. Sweet, rich, with virtually no bitterness, I really can't recommend it highly enough if you enjoy black tea. Oh, and it ices really well, too.

TillEulenspiegel
26-07-2011, 09:09 PM
Oh, oh! I found a German tea brand that isn't awful and tastes like tea. A small miracle. Captains Tea, "Ceylon Assam", made for the discounter chain Netto. I think it was really cheap, about a Euro for 50 bags. Perfectly decent substitute for English breakfast tea; I've been surviving on it for the past few days.

CWalker
26-07-2011, 10:29 PM
If I don't drink a cup of tea a day, I cease to function properly. It doesn't matter who makes it, or where it's from, as long as it has milk and two spoonfuls of sugar, I'm happy. That said, when I was in France, I was forced into having it milkless and sugarless, and it was ruddy delightful. So, yes, tea.

westyfield
26-07-2011, 11:10 PM
I have recently discovered that Kenya Milima Estate is one of my favorite black teas of all time. Sweet, rich, with virtually no bitterness, I really can't recommend it highly enough if you enjoy black tea. Oh, and it ices really well, too.

Ices well, you say? Hmmmm. All the teas I have at home are delicious hot, but pretty awful iced unless you put a lot of lemon and sugar in (at which point I stop and ask myself why I didn't make lemonade instead). Could do with looking this stuff up.

Plankton
27-07-2011, 11:04 AM
I am a tea fan too. No milk, no sugar. Sugar creates this bad feeling and taste in my mouth after a while, blergh. If you need milk in your tea then it's probably just too bitter for my liking.
I tend to pour the boiling water into my tea pot or my pint tea-cup and let it rest for a minute and only then put in the tea (unless its herbal or fruit or rooibos then its straight into the boiling water). It's almost always loose leave tea im drinking. In winter I drink more than in summer.
Loving green tea in particular. Got enamoured with the taste of Green tea because of a bag of unlabelled tea I found in the cupboard. Pretty sure it had some other ingredient in it as well that gave it a special flavour. Since then I've been on the search for that green tea. Haven't found it yet. There was another really great green tea my brother brought back from his vacation on Sri Lanka (he bought a full kilo). It created this nice bit of foam, kind of like coffee does, when you poured in the water. No idea why I can't seem to find a kind of green tea like that over here either.

Similar
27-07-2011, 11:45 AM
Loving green tea in particular. Got enamoured with the taste of Green tea because of a bag of unlabelled tea I found in the cupboard. Pretty sure it had some other ingredient in it as well that gave it a special flavour. Since then I've been on the search for that green tea. Haven't found it yet. There was another really great green tea my brother brought back from his vacation on Sri Lanka (he bought a full kilo). It created this nice bit of foam, kind of like coffee does, when you poured in the water. No idea why I can't seem to find a kind of green tea like that over here either.
I've had problems finding green teas that foam properly too; they don't seem to taste like they should if they don't foam. I don't know if it's partly because the kinds you can get here usually aren't too fresh or something. Some of the ones I've tried have been really horrible too. I usually stick with Chinese gunpowder tea now.
I usually pour the tea from the pot into another pot or bowl from a good height and back again a few times to get as much air into the tea as possible. That seems to help. I also have a small whisk I use and that can make all the difference for the taste.


Aside from a bit of green tea from time to time, I mainly just drink some variant of Earl Grey (or what they call Earl Grey, anyway) because it's hard to find anything else here, unless you want to resort to teabags, which I don't. I do prefer the simpler black teas, though. No sugar, milk or lemon or anything. Earl Grey with jasmin is about as complicated as I like to get, but then, I do drink about 5-6 liters of tea a day and it's hard to find fancier tea blends that I can stand to drink that much of.

I got all spontaneous the other day and bought 'licorice tea', black tea with anise. Smells sort of like boiling pastis when you make it, but it's much more mild when you drink it. Nice for a bit of variation.

Kody94
27-07-2011, 06:25 PM
Morning: English Breakfast tea, boiling water, steep for 4 minutes, add a splash of milk and honey.
10:00 a.m.: Regular black tea, boiling water, steep for 1 minute, splash of milk and a spoonful of sugar.
Afternoon: Earl Grey, boiling water, leave the teabag in as it's good at all strengths, add a tiny bit of sugar.
Evening: Chamomile tea, not-quite-but-almost boiling water, leave the teabag in, drink as is or add a bit of honey.
Around noon I also usually drink a glass of my homemade iced black tea with some sugar.

And yes, I use teabags. Mostly because it's impossible to find anything loose locally (tea shop closed its doors last year :( ) and because it's convenient.

I ran out of English Breakfast so I tried some coffee this morning. Now I remember why I quit coffee (only a couple months ago); it's like drinking liquid tar, puts me in a bad mood, it's addicting, and totally throws my digestion out of whack. Sigh.

DigitalSignalX
27-07-2011, 07:26 PM
I actually prefer my tea with ice and some sugar. But then again, as an American, where you have to go out of your way to find tea that quite literally isn't the crap that falls on the floor when they're making real tea, my tastes run a bit simple. Three or four really large tea bags from Lipton in a four quart jug, steep all day on the porch till it's the color of black molasses. Then just store in fridge, mix half/half with cold water when you pour a glass. It lasts about a week.

Kody94
27-07-2011, 07:57 PM
I actually prefer my tea with ice and some sugar. But then again, as an American, where you have to go out of your way to find tea that quite literally isn't the crap that falls on the floor when they're making real tea, my tastes run a bit simple. Three or four really large tea bags from Lipton in a four quart jug, steep all day on the porch till it's the color of black molasses. Then just store in fridge, mix half/half with cold water when you pour a glass. It lasts about a week.

Yeah it's hard to find quality tea here in Arizona unless you're lucky enough to find a specialty shop. And every time I complain to friends about the lack of real tea they just give me a funny look and ask me what the heck I'm talking about, there's a perfectly good can of [syrupy] iced tea right behind you on the shelf.

For my iced tea I just throw some Bigelow (sp?) black tea bags in a glass jug and set it outside to steep for a few hours. I usually just put lemon and sugar in mine, though. Never tried half and half, though.

President Weasel
27-07-2011, 08:09 PM
I've always held that if you leave tea leaves or tea bags in too long it gets "stewed" - oversteeped and bitter. Partly because it's been brewing for too long, and partly because more bitter chemicals such as tannins and less of the "good stuff" comes out at lower temperatures, which is why you should use boiling water when making tea and never, ever put the milk into the cup with the teabag and then add the water.
However I know nothing of the making of iced tea, and since you're the ones who are drinking it I suspect you're doing it right.

I do know that America, as a whole, has a reputation for brining you a cup of hottish water and a teabag on the side. What is wrong with you, stereotyped America?

vinraith
27-07-2011, 08:36 PM
I've always held that if you leave tea leaves or tea bags in too long it gets "stewed" - oversteeped and bitter. Partly because it's been brewing for too long, and partly because more bitter chemicals such as tannins and less of the "good stuff" comes out at lower temperatures, which is why you should use boiling water when making tea and never, ever put the milk into the cup with the teabag and then add the water.
However I know nothing of the making of iced tea, and since you're the ones who are drinking it I suspect you're doing it right.



The tannin issue certainly applies to icing tea as well. That is, steeping black tea for "hours" to make iced tea will result in profoundly bitter iced tea. Then again, if you're using Bigelow or Lipton, it's going to be bitter anyway, so it's entirely possible not to notice. As far as cheap bagged black tea for icing goes, Luzianne is (IMO) much better.


I do know that America, as a whole, has a reputation for brining you a cup of hottish water and a teabag on the side. What is wrong with you, stereotyped America?

Most people don't know the difference. It is, however, entirely possible to get very tasty flavored teas from bags in this country (Harney and Sons Hot Cinnamon Spice being a prime example). For straight black tea, though, you're wildly better off with something loose.

TillEulenspiegel
27-07-2011, 08:53 PM
For straight black tea, though, you're wildly better off with something loose.
I thought Red Rose was pretty decent (also, little ceramic figurines!), but I haven't had it in years. Nostalgia factor?

I do remember Trader Joe's Earl Grey being surprisingly poor, though.

President Weasel
27-07-2011, 08:58 PM
A favourite fact of mine is that British armoured vehicles (such as the Challenger 2 MBT) come with a Boiling Vessel as standard equipment (http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2003/apr/07/iraq.military), to ensure the troops can always have a cuppa.

tossrStu
28-07-2011, 12:48 AM
I was talking to someone earlier who makes her tea with soya milk and six sugars. SOYA MILK AND SIX SUGARS, I ask you. She is clearly NUTS.

vinraith
28-07-2011, 02:12 AM
I thought Red Rose was pretty decent (also, little ceramic figurines!), but I haven't had it in years. Nostalgia factor?

I do remember Trader Joe's Earl Grey being surprisingly poor, though.

Yeah, qualify everything I said there with "usually" and "in my experience." I've not had Red Rose, so I couldn't comment.

P7uen
28-07-2011, 06:14 AM
At work they only have Lipton's English Breakfast, my friend says I should be bringing Yorkshire in at my own expense.

We also don't have milk, we have little plastic pots of chemicals. I was told it was 'Half and Half', but when I asked what the halves were, I received a blank expression. So I buy my own milk.

As only bagged is practical at work, what do you seasoned drinkers recommend?

Plankton
28-07-2011, 09:52 AM
I was talking to someone earlier who makes her tea with soya milk and six sugars. SOYA MILK AND SIX SUGARS, I ask you. She is clearly NUTS.

Challenge accepted, I'm gonna try this!

Jams O'Donnell
28-07-2011, 10:01 AM
Yeah it's hard to find quality tea here in Arizona unless you're lucky enough to find a specialty shop.
The Internet will help. Buy your tea online!

I get delicious Republic of Tea (http://www.republicoftea.com/) tea (maté and vanilla almond), which I fell in love with when I lived in the US, shipped in bulk to the UK (500 tea bags for ~$70).

Also, in Chicago there's a lovely chain of tea shops called Argo Tea (http://www.argotea.com/), and you can buy their loose tea online (though they won't ship internationally, the scoundrels). If you like maté, their maté laté is the best, with almond and cocoa.

Of course, there are bound to be numerous other online tea sources too.

Kody94
28-07-2011, 04:16 PM
Thanks, I'll have to look into those sites. I've heard the Art of Tea is a good site to shop at, but I believe they only sell loose tea (which isn't a bad thing, I just have no way of making it at the moment).

Due to my lack of English Breakfast I resorted to Bigelow black tea with honey this morning. It was surprisingly very good.

Plankton
28-07-2011, 04:20 PM
Thanks, I'll have to look into those sites. I've heard the Art of Tea is a good site to shop at, but I believe they only sell loose tea (which isn't a bad thing, I just have no way of making it at the moment).


Make sure you check your supermarket. Over here we have DIY-teabags for loose leave tea next to all the coffee filter shenanigans.

Kody94
28-07-2011, 05:17 PM
Make sure you check your supermarket. Over here we have DIY-teabags for loose leave tea next to all the coffee filter shenanigans.
I do remember seeing empty teabags at Fry's a while back, before I drank tea. I'll have to check those out some time. Are the tea bags portable or do you have to use them immediately after you prepare them?

westyfield
28-07-2011, 06:40 PM
There are also things like the Sharky that Anthile posted on the third page, or 'tea submarines' - essentially a reusable metal teabag.
Good side: They're portable because they're solid; they look awesome.
Bad side: You still have to fill them with loose tea, so you'd need to bring a bag of tea and a spoon to work; they're too expensive to buy a few and fill them up at home.

Kody94
29-07-2011, 03:56 AM
Looked up growing tea today. Found out it takes 3 years. Another project to attempt some day.

CuervoJoe
02-08-2011, 11:08 PM
Twinings Earl Grey is very good, as is Typhoo. I've never actually drank loose tea, I can't be bothered with all that fuss, but I have milk and 2 sugars if I have Typhoo, Milk and a tiny bit of sugar if it's Earl Grey, or if I'm feeling particularly bourgeois, a slice of lemon.

Dunking's fine with tea bags, but not with fine blends. Digestives are my dunking biscuit of choice.

R-F
02-08-2011, 11:17 PM
I like my tea when it is not tea and is instead hot chocolate.

Kadayi
02-08-2011, 11:18 PM
I like my tea when it is not tea and is instead hot chocolate.

*closes the door on the Iron Maiden on R-F*

CuervoJoe
02-08-2011, 11:43 PM
*closes the door on the Iron Maiden on R-F*

*Kicks Iron Maiden into bubbling vat of tea*

R-F
03-08-2011, 12:06 AM
No! The terrible taste and smell! Wry~~~

Danny252
03-08-2011, 12:42 AM
I'll take the odd bit of Earl Grey (read: when stealing from flatmates), but usually stick with something more simple. No sugar (formerly did have it, but I soon realised that using sugar would involve carting yet another item back from the shops), milk after removal of teabag. Dunking acceptable as long as the biscuit is not prone to complete disintegration upon merely seeing water - I don't want slush at the end of my cuppa!

I get horribly confused when, upon hearing that I drink tea in copious amounts, people drag me to their tea cupboard and show me their 50 types of greenfruitloosetea. The conversation generally ends with "...so where's the normal teabags?"

Ethyls
03-08-2011, 09:31 PM
I'm a tea and coffee drinker, although I tend to drink more coffee (about 10/15 glasses a day - 'cause, yeah, I kinda broke my awesome cups (http://images.shopoon.fr/products/200x200/DLM_APD1215017.jpg) a while back). That's probably due to the fact that I'm a smoker, and, let's face it : coffee and cigarette is an OP 2-hits combo.
I'm heavily biased towards black tea, any kind will do. I once tasted an amazing gunpower though, but I have no idea where it actually came from (my dad told me he got it from "a Chinese friend", didn't seem to want to elaborate on that). No sugar nor milk, but if it rains outside, it tastes better (or it doesn't, but it feels good nonetheless).