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johnki
16-06-2012, 12:02 PM
So I have a Cyberpower computer that's only about 6 months old. I think it's overclocked, I game a lot, and sometimes I leave it on overnight, maybe even 2 nights in a row even though I was advised not to (not sure if that's relevant). Here are the specs:

Windows 7 Home Premium
Intel Core i7 (8 CPUs) 3.7 GHz
16 GB RAM
AMD Radeon 6800 Series
1000GB HDD with 641 GB free complemented by a 100GB (I think) SSD

Up until yesterday, I have never upgraded any of the drivers, the Windows 7 software, etc. I shut off Windows Update because it hogged all my bandwidth and usually updating Windows broke something until it updated again.

All of the sudden, yesterday, I started having issues with TERA taking forever (read: About 5-6 minutes to get all the way in-game) to load when it had been fine before, and once in-game, NPCs failed to load correctly at first. I later tried to load up Far Cry and it took literally almost 2 minutes to load just the level. I then, just to test, tried loading up The Witcher and Hard Reset. Hard Reset took about 3 minutes, the Witcher took somewhere in between 3 and 5. All of them had noticeable stutter. It wasn't often (30 seconds-ish in-between), but it's something that has never happened before. Then, later, the load times went down significantly while still seeming a lot higher than usual. The stutter when I shot went away in Hard Reset. Didn't check all of them.

Yesterday, I updated the AMD Catalyst drivers for my graphics card. The first download ended up being corrupted during install, so I re-downloaded. The install worked, but the driver was still reading 11.9 (the current one is 12.4), and it still said there was an upgrade available. So I redownloaded the installer and installed it again. Nothing changed.

Today, I loaded up Psychonauts, and while it loads pretty quickly, some areas are stuttering like 1 stutter per second. It's pretty noticeable and probably shouldn't happen.

I still haven't upgraded Windows itself.

I don't have an antivirus, but all the sites I've been to since the issue started and before I noticed the issue. The only ones that I wasn't 100% sure about were the HPSSims site (creators of Tigers Unleashed, been featured here, Google Safe Browsing said 55 pages or so were clean), and the open source Ur-Quan Masters site and download, but it's pretty popular so I gather it's safe (EDIT: Oh, and the Spy Party site, which I'd never been on but I gather that's safe too :P). All the other sites have been regular forums, blogs, etc I visited long before the issue.

I really don't know what could be causing it, barring that my computer is slowly wearing down after only 6 months.

Thanks in advance.

Alex Bakke
16-06-2012, 12:50 PM
Are Windows, Tera and Psychonauts all on the SSD?

johnki
16-06-2012, 01:05 PM
No, they're all on the HDD, as far as I know. TERA and Psychonauts for sure. To be honest, I don't know where Windows is installed. Either way, they haven't changed location since they were working fine.

I'm pretty sure the SSD is just for quickly loading the operating system, or at least I got an explanation similar to that.

EDIT: I don't know if it's related, but I am getting disturbingly regular page crashes in Google Chrome, and occasional full on crashes of Google Chrome and this started before the stutter/load issues. I cleared the cache and everything, but it's still been doing it.

In case it's relevant, my computer is custom-made and it's got some sort of bootloader of its own before it starts Windows.

Mistabashi
16-06-2012, 01:15 PM
Well first of all disabling Windows Update is a bad idea, the updates are there for a good reason, and often address security exploits or stability issues. In particular, a lot of the behavior relating to SSDs was addressed via updates, so you really should install them all.

Your issue sounds software related, although it could be a HDD issue too. The first thing I would do is download and run Malwarebytes (http://www.malwarebytes.org/) (don't bother with the "full" trial, just install the free version) to make sure you don't have anything nasty causing the problem.

What make & model is your SSD? A lot of drives have crippling firmware issues, so it's really important to make sure you're using the latest firmware version.

You might also want to run chkdisk on the HDD to see if there's any issue there, and perhaps use something to check it's SMART status to see if there's any indicators of imminent failure.

thegooseking
16-06-2012, 01:18 PM
This is just a guess and could be completely wrong.

Windows 7 and Windows Vista do this thing called SuperFetch: it's like the prefetch caching of previous versions of Windows, but more advanced. While PreFetch kept application data cached in memory after you quit the application (making it quicker to load again), SuperFetch pro-actively copies application data it thinks you're going to need (based on your previous behaviour) into memory, so that they'll load quicker. It can discard cache if it needs the memory for something else: that's why, in the Task Manager, it reports much more 'available' memory than 'free' memory. This doesn't just happen when you boot up, but it tries to recognise your routine, so it caches different things in the evening than in the morning, and so on. While this theoretically makes your system run faster, it does slow down while it's caching. The more memory you have (and I think 16GB is the maximum Windows 7 Home can recognise), the more it'll use for cache, and the longer it'll take to copy those cached files from the hard disk to memory.

If, somehow, my guess is right, your system isn't wearing down after 6 months, but Windows thinks it has learned your routine, and is using a lot of your memory for cache, which is good, except that it means long periods where it's copying files to memory, and slowing down the hard disk for other things. Whether or not you should disable SuperFetch is a heated debate, because a lot of people mistakenly want to disable it to get more Free memory. The standard answer to that is that you should focus on Available memory rather than Free memory (which is true, because unused memory is wasted memory), but that completely ignores the disk overhead of copying that data into memory in the first place, which is not negligible. Unfortunately, I think your only options are to leave SuperFetch on or disable it; if it's possible to control how much memory it uses for caching (and thus how long it takes to copy the cached files from disk), I don't know how. It seems like, if it's enabled, it'll use as much memory as it can.

If you really want to disable SuperFetch (bearing in mind that a lot of people don't recommend it) you can do that by going to the Task Manager, going to the Services tab, clicking on the Services... button, finding SuperFetch, double-clicking it to bring up the Properties window, and changing the Startup Type drop-down box to Disabled. That should give you a bit of overall slowdown, since you no longer have caching, but eliminate those periods of extreme slowdown when Windows is copying cache data into memory.

I don't want to recommend disabling it, but you can, at the very least, disable it to see if it helps and re-enable it if it doesn't.

johnki
16-06-2012, 01:34 PM
Okay, chkdsk found nothing wrong.

When I go to properties for the C: drive, all I can find is one drive and it is telling me it's working fine. Don't know the make or model, but I can give you the name if that'll help.

I was told I have an SSD, and even shown the SSD in the computer, but it's not picking it up. I think it might exclusively be for backups or something to do with whatever loads Windows up before Windows actually loads up.

EDIT: As far as anti-virus/anti-malware, is Malwarebytes the way to go? Or is that just an install, scan, uninstall deal as described here? I had Microsoft Security Essentials on my last computer and it seemed to work pretty well. Before that, I had a Trend Micro subscription (came with the computer...got that one from Best Buy), but it seemed to take up a LOT of CPU.

Oh, and as far as SuperFetch goes, I'd rather not turn off something that's supposed to help until I run out of options.

Feldspar
16-06-2012, 02:22 PM
You might lust want to check your cables, make sure the drives are plugged securely into the motherboard, long shot, but it's something that I suffered from.

johnki
16-06-2012, 02:25 PM
You might lust want to check your cables, make sure the drives are plugged securely into the motherboard, long shot, but it's something that I suffered from.
Yeah, I'll give that a shot. The thing gets moved around a lot going back and forth between places.

johnki
16-06-2012, 02:53 PM
Okay, I think I know what's wrong (but not how to fix it), but it'd be fantastic if someone could give me insight into how right/wrong I might be.

So, about a week or two ago, I started getting the first blue screens that I've gotten with this computer. It didn't happen often, as of today, maybe a third or fourth time ever, but it always came up with the error "MEMORY_MANAGEMENT". Well, I didn't think anything of it. I have 16 GB RAM, never use more than 20% of it, it didn't seem that there was actually anything wrong with it, and, of course, it's Windows. I've had Windows blue screen over pretty much nothing on other setups.

Anyways, after today, I decided to look into it. Given that I'm assuming from the caching and the SuperFetch and all that load times are pretty dependent on memory and management thereof, it seems safe to assume that, from my research, what is wrong is that one or more of the sticks of RAM in my computer have gone bad. Perhaps it's only just now gotten noticeable.

Anyways, if this is the case, how would I go about testing it? I'm not really an expert on hardware, so I'd need a rundown on how to tell where the RAM is, how to single out a bad one, etc. Maybe even tips for making sure they run efficiently.

Thanks again guys. :)

Heliocentric
16-06-2012, 03:03 PM
Try auslogics defrag(its free) , run an optimise it'll take a few hours.
Edit: bad ram? Take some out, bench mark the ram, pit it back in, take other piece out.

Process of elimination.

johnki
16-06-2012, 03:10 PM
Try auslogics defrag(its free) , run an optimise it'll take a few hours.
Edit: bad ram? Take some out, bench mark the ram, pit it back in, take other piece out.

Process of elimination.
Alright, should I turn the computer off each time I change out the RAM? And how do I benchmark it? After that, what am I looking for to know it's bad?

Bobtree
16-06-2012, 05:48 PM
Any stability problems at all suggest you should undo the overclock, especially with that BSOD, and check that your settings are correct in BIOS/UEFI (RAM timings, CPU freq, bus speeds, etc), and then run memtest86 overnight. If you find it's hardware related (like memtest86 throwing errors), make sure your cables are neatly routed in the case and not next to sensitive components.

Do enable windows update, and use the download but ask before installing if you want to, but always apply security updates regularly. Antivirus programs often cause performance issues, especially things like game loading if they want to check every file as they're accessed. MSE is among the least intrusive and best behaved, and free from MS, so I recommend using it and no other permanent scanners.

If the SSD has a certain Sandforce controller, that's a known BSOD source and you can get a firmware update from the manufacturer. My OCZ Vertex3 had this issue and would BSOD once a week until the fix came out 4 months later. The update came last October, so your machine shouldn't have this problem unless it's got an SSD that sat on a shelf for a long time.

Mistabashi
16-06-2012, 05:48 PM
Faulty RAM can cause bluescreens, but it won't cause this sort of performance issue. You can test RAM using Memtest or something similar, but I don't think this is your issue. Blue screens are an indicator of a either a hardware or driver issue, and aren't something you should ever ignore (they don't happen without a good reason). The STOP code displayed during a BSoD can help you to diagnose it, but if you didn't catch it you might want to wait until it happens again and make a note of the code, or enable minidumps (http://blog.nirsoft.net/2010/07/27/how-to-configure-windows-to-create-minidump-files-on-bsod/) which will provide a log containing some useful information.

Of course, driver bugs/incompatibilities can also cause BSoDs, which is why it's not a good idea to disable Windows Update as device drivers won't be made for compatibility with Windows pre-updates. If you're pre-SP1 in particular that's going to cause tons of potential issues.

As for your missing SSD, can you check the Device Manager and see what is listed under "disk drives"? It's possible your SSD is set-up as a cache drive for your HDD, rather than as a storage volume.

Bobtree
16-06-2012, 06:06 PM
Alright, should I turn the computer off each time I change out the RAM? And how do I benchmark it? After that, what am I looking for to know it's bad?

It sounds like you shouldn't do this yourself johnki, and yes the system must to be off for you to swap compontents. Memtest86 is a tool you boot the system with (instead of an OS), that repeatedly tests RAM in several ways to find errors. If it's clean, you're done. Errors can be tracked down to individual bad sticks, interference from wiring, or even bad motherboard slots. It's a technical, tedious process, so I suggest you get someone to help you. Motherboards also don't support all combinations of RAM sizes in all slots, so it's important to read the manual or look up what sequence they they need to be in. Since you have 16GB, it's probably 4 sticks of 4GB, which makes it simpler, but you still may need to fill only certain slot combos, or fill them in a certain sequence. Installing components is also somewhat delicate, and a static discharge can fry parts if you're not careful.

I got the MEMORY_MANAGEMENT BSOD exactly once in my current system, which has been utterly reliable except for the early SSD issue. Memory bits can be flipped by cosmic rays (radiation from space, no joking), but this wouldn't cause repeating problems, so I think that's what happened in my case. The OS may also not be bug free yet.

Memory errors are likely to be completely unnoticed, or corrupt some data, or to crash the system. They probably wouldn't make games load slowly. You could still have some malware or misbehaving antivirus, or a disk related hardware issue.

johnki
17-06-2012, 03:23 AM
So taking it one step at a time, I decided to install the Windows updates...only every time I try to install them, it gets hung up on a random update somewhere in the teens. I've been having a lot of issues with corrupted downloads recently, also. Except stopping installations doesn't works (stays hung up) and telling the computer to restart gets it hung up where it was before and I had to force restart it.

Great, you know what, it's a hard drive issue, isn't it? I mean, there IS probably something related to the RAM that's causing the blue screens and I still need to figure that out, but there also might be something wrong with the hard drive...right?

EDIT2: ...but chkdsk didn't find anything wrong. Could there still be something wrong?

EDIT: Installing one update at a time seems to be working, but that's...bleh, that could take ages...

Heliocentric
17-06-2012, 05:12 AM
It's not good enough to just turn the pc off when you swap ram, you'd need to isolate it(switching it off *all* the power sockets used by your pc and anything plugged into it for example) and drain it (this one is easy, the power on button if held downloads for 15 seconds will drain the capacitors).

So checklist

Turn off all mains
Hold down power (15 secs )
Open case
Reconfigure ram (do process of elimination, assume 1 stick is bad, hell it might just be 'seated' badly or all your ram could be faulty)
close case
Turn on mains
turn on pc
Run memtest
Oberve for errors, return to start

Found out what's wrong?

johnki
17-06-2012, 06:13 AM
Thanks, Heliocentric, although I'm starting to think it's the hard drive, as someone suggested it may be. Even more so now. Windows System Assessment ran on its own today, so I checked the ratings. Everything is a 7.7 except the hard drive, which got a 5.9. Apparently that's still really high, but it sounds like it might affect large and/or more demanding PC games, which is what seems to be happening.

It'd also make sense that downloads were being corrupted if that happened, and might explain the Google Chrome pages crashing. Maybe it's having issues saving to the hard disk, so downloads are corrupting, and then it's having issues loading the cache, so Chrome's pages are crashing.

Alright, what's the usual course of action for testing this?

Feldspar
17-06-2012, 09:49 AM
I'm sorry, I think you really don't know what you are talking about.

The Windows System Assessment is just a way of rating the relative speed of components based on some arbitrary scale known only to Microsoft, it is in no sense a diagnostic tool. 5.9 is probably about as high as you can get on a traditional HDD and in no way means it is slowing things down.

If it was corrupting downloads by saving them on the HDD, then it would also be corrupting everything else saved on the HDD, very soon you would have a completely garbled drive and nothing would work. Hell, I doubt it's even using the drive for web pages, you have oodles of RAM.

I'm slightly worried that you think you have a SSD, but it doesn't seem to exist, having an SSD 'for back-up' doesn't make any sense whatsoever.

Some of your symptoms could be explained by graphics card issues, others point to your internet connection, it sounds like it's crap and maybe you're getting noise from somewhere.

Honestly, I think you should get someone else to fix this.

Heliocentric
17-06-2012, 10:27 AM
Windows actually really cleverly manages hard drive corruption, it often spots it before its a problem (it writes the file, read it and then notes the failure) and flags the hard drive area as "do not use".

Transient errors (things which happen in a seemingly random way) are nearly always ram.

johnki
17-06-2012, 10:53 AM
I'm sorry, I think you really don't know what you are talking about.
Honestly, I don't. Frankly, if I did, I'd be fixing it right now. I game, I dabble in programming, but that's about all I know about computers. But at the same time, I can't really afford the price of Geeksquad just to have it looked at and some diagnostics that I could probably get instruction on and do myself for free (even if it takes a while) and we don't have local shops to get computers fixed at.

I do have an SSD, I can see it (I checked when checking where the RAM was and all...and yes, I Googled all this to know what I was looking for...), but it definitely isn't showing up anywhere, and yeah, that's concerning. There's a ehm...Gigabyte Touch Bios thing that loads when the computer starts and loads Windows off it (I couldn't remember the name earlier), and I was told that that's what the SSD is used for. But, at the same time, I was told it was used for some sort of backup/cache that makes loading Windows faster.

Since you guys are pretty sure it's RAM, I'll see if I can find someone to take a look at it. But I don't really see what RAM has to do with corrupted downloads and consistent webpage loading errors. And Chrome doesn't generally break when the network is acting up, it just hangs and sometimes won't load another page (even once the network IS working) until I restart it. That, and the wireless adapter is younger than the computer and has been working fine in a visible way up until now.

I am in no way challenging what you're saying, just trying to think it out. At the same time though, I'd really hate to think that a bunch of things are breaking on the computer all at once.

Anyways, I'll see what I can do. Thanks for putting up with my not knowing what I'm talking about and such and responding. If there's any specific thing you think I should look into, I'm all ears. Since everyone's definitely thinking it's RAM, I'm going to look there.

Hypernetic
17-06-2012, 11:03 AM
Why don't you just call CyberPower since you bought it from them 6 months ago? It's probably still under warranty and if not most of the parts definitely are.

It really sounds like you have no idea what you are doing and need someone to walk you through various diagnostic steps. Even if one of us could help you, you will still need to call CyberPower anyway to get parts replaced (if it is indeed a hardware issue) so you might as well just call them anyway.

Feldspar
17-06-2012, 11:28 AM
I do have an SSD, I can see it (I checked when checking where the RAM was and all...and yes, I Googled all this to know what I was looking for...), but it definitely isn't showing up anywhere, and yeah, that's concerning. There's a ehm...Gigabyte Touch Bios thing that loads when the computer starts and loads Windows off it (I couldn't remember the name earlier), and I was told that that's what the SSD is used for. But, at the same time, I was told it was used for some sort of backup/cache that makes loading Windows faster.

Er, the BIOS loads off the motherboard, Windows should be installed on the SSD, that's what would make it load faster, unless it's some sort of hybrid drive that combines SSD and traditional HDD in one.

Heliocentric
17-06-2012, 11:31 AM
Yeah, go with the warranty.

Ram is the short term memory of the pc, part of it is improperly remembering (probably) this effects loading (files misload) and downloads (what you download might lie on the corrupted area).

Ram is used for EVERYTHING

johnki
17-06-2012, 11:36 AM
Er, the BIOS loads off the motherboard, Windows should be installed on the SSD, that's what would make it load faster, unless it's some sort of hybrid drive that combines SSD and traditional HDD in one.
I really don't know then. That's what I was told

@Heliocentric/Hypernetic: I'll see if the warranty isn't expired by now. I can't remember off the top of my head.

@Heliocentric: I wasn't aware RAM was used for everything. I actually thought it was just used in the running of programs. Which, while technically that may encompass everything, I had thought things like downloads somehow bypassed RAM use.

Kamikaze-X
17-06-2012, 11:44 AM
it amazes me that someone who "dabbles in programming" doesn't show much of an interest in the hardware you would be supposedly "programming".

Call up Cyberpower and tell them to fix it under sales of goods act. It should last a reasonable amount of time in a good running order, and they must either repair or replace it. Warranty doesnt even come into it.

Mistabashi
17-06-2012, 03:41 PM
it amazes me that someone who "dabbles in programming" doesn't show much of an interest in the hardware you would be supposedly "programming".

Call up Cyberpower and tell them to fix it under sales of goods act. It should last a reasonable amount of time in a good running order, and they must either repair or replace it. Warranty doesnt even come into it.

The Sale of Goods Act only applies to the UK, the poster seems to be in the US. You wouldn't get anywhere with that in the UK anyway if it was outside the warranty period.

However, new electronics always come with a minimum 12 month warranty even in the US (as far as I know at least), so it really isn't going to be a problem.

Kamikaze-X
17-06-2012, 03:58 PM
The Sale of Goods Act only applies to the UK, the poster seems to be in the US. You wouldn't get anywhere with that in the UK anyway if it was outside the warranty period.
well, I did with HMV, when my really rather expensive Denon headphones started cracking even being handled with kid gloves. showed them the crack, showed them the numerous reviews or it happening, and they gave me a replacement there and then. It was a good while outside of normal warranty too.

Mistabashi
17-06-2012, 04:18 PM
well, I did with HMV, when my really rather expensive Denon headphones started cracking even being handled with kid gloves. showed them the crack, showed them the numerous reviews or it happening, and they gave me a replacement there and then. It was a good while outside of normal warranty too.

If you identify a design flaw it's another matter (although still rather difficult to prove). In practice though, retaillers will often do things like that just to keep customers happy and avoid causing a fuss (particularly the larger ones who's staff don't have a clue about retail law), it doesn't mean they're legally bound to do so.

Bobtree
17-06-2012, 08:44 PM
It sounds like his SSD is actually installed as a cache. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smart_Response_Technology

This is a reasonable thing to do for someone who wants a high performance system but does not know how to manage one on their own and isn't going to drop big money for a big SSD storage bank.

djbriandamage
19-06-2012, 09:45 PM
Before you go tearing your PC apart, I'd entertain the possibility that perhaps it's time to format your hard drive and reinstall the OS. I like to do this about every 6 months as I love to try out software, hack around with things, and generally be a big pest to my poor machine.

The need to reinstall your OS has decreased significantly since the 90's but it can still help streamline things. Just bear in mind you must back up all your data and perhaps some of your applications themselves since formatting will irreversibly delete the entire contents of your drive (or partition).

Please ask as many questions as you wish and we'll be glad to walk you through whatever you decide to do. :)

johnki
20-06-2012, 12:28 AM
Well, I've been out of town so I've been a little slow to actually work on the issue, however decidedly bad of an idea that may be.

Just today, I finally got around to installing Microsoft Security Essentials (I have used it before, it's free, and it's really not annoying like Norton, Trend Micro [Trend Micro is nice, and has lots of features, but iirc, it took a lot of RAM and was generally pretty intrusive...I may be partially mixing it up with Norton though], etc) and after the Quick Scan, I started a Full Scan, checked back an hour-ish later and the computer had blue screened with a "SYSTEM_SERVICE_EXCEPTION" error, which is an entirely new problem. Then, I started the computer back up, and after the usual crashing schtick, I started a new Full Scan, to which MSE shut itself off about 10 minutes later, and now I'm in the middle of a third attempt, but this isn't too promising of a sign.

I have actually had to format my computer before, but the drive isn't even half used up, and in general, the idea doesn't thrill me, even with backups.

Kamikaze-X
20-06-2012, 01:01 PM
Well, I've been out of town so I've been a little slow to actually work on the issue, however decidedly bad of an idea that may be.

Just today, I finally got around to installing Microsoft Security Essentials (I have used it before, it's free, and it's really not annoying like Norton, Trend Micro [Trend Micro is nice, and has lots of features, but iirc, it took a lot of RAM and was generally pretty intrusive...I may be partially mixing it up with Norton though], etc) and after the Quick Scan, I started a Full Scan, checked back an hour-ish later and the computer had blue screened with a "SYSTEM_SERVICE_EXCEPTION" error, which is an entirely new problem. Then, I started the computer back up, and after the usual crashing schtick, I started a new Full Scan, to which MSE shut itself off about 10 minutes later, and now I'm in the middle of a third attempt, but this isn't too promising of a sign.

I have actually had to format my computer before, but the drive isn't even half used up, and in general, the idea doesn't thrill me, even with backups.

really, just take it back.

at the worst, this is a motherboard issue with the storage controller, or even a provblem with the on-cpu memory controller being damaged. At best, this is a failing hard disk or SSD, or stick of RAM playing up.

Zelu
14-05-2014, 12:04 AM
I have no clue where to put this so I just looked up an old thread and decided to reply on it, since I can't figure out for the life of me how to create a new thread.

I am experiencing a similar problem with a computer that I recieved about a month or two ago. It had some damages once it came but they didn't seem to be severe or any cause inside of the computer - rather just the case - but it has been progressively going downhill since then. My games run fine and all, though now I am recieving this really weird stuttering once I load up a new page in Chrome or open any other program on my computer. This is mostly noticable when I am listening to music using Spotify, or talking to friends on skype.
Any ideas? I barely have anything on it except from WoW and that is pretty much it. If it helps, I am using two screens though disconnecting one and only running on the other one didn't seem to fix the issue at all.

trjp
14-05-2014, 03:44 AM
I have no clue where to put this so I just looked up an old thread and decided to reply on it, since I can't figure out for the life of me how to create a new thread.

I am experiencing a similar problem with a computer that I recieved about a month or two ago. It had some damages once it came but they didn't seem to be severe or any cause inside of the computer - rather just the case - but it has been progressively going downhill since then. My games run fine and all, though now I am recieving this really weird stuttering once I load up a new page in Chrome or open any other program on my computer. This is mostly noticable when I am listening to music using Spotify, or talking to friends on skype.
Any ideas? I barely have anything on it except from WoW and that is pretty much it. If it helps, I am using two screens though disconnecting one and only running on the other one didn't seem to fix the issue at all.

You can't create a new thread until you have a few posts under your belt (not sure the exact number - seems to vary)

To answer your question we really need to know a LOT more

1 - you say stuttering - what's stuttering? Sound? Images? PC Performance? What EXACTLY is the problem
2 - what CPU, motherboard, GPU, version of Windows and SSD/HDDs do you have (anything else you feel might be relevant - feel free to include that too)
3 - have you ensured all the correct drivers for the motherboard/GPU/sound etc. are installed and up-to-date

That should do for starters

baboonanza
14-05-2014, 08:59 AM
My money would be on a driver issue. I've seen similar symptoms that were caused by wifi drivers.

Zelu
14-05-2014, 01:17 PM
All right, that explains it :)

Bear with me since I am a complete noob when it comes to computers and everything that has to do with it. The computer is very new, if that helps. I also looked up the specs with DXDiag

Operating System: Windows 8.1 64-bit (6.3, Build 9600) (9600.winblue_gdr.131030-1505)
Language: Swedish (Regional Setting: Swedish)
System Manufacturer: MSI
System Model: MS-7821
BIOS: BIOS Date: 02/06/14 15:28:27 Ver: 04.06.05
Processor: Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-4770K CPU @ 3.50GHz (8 CPUs), ~3.5GHz
Memory: 16384MB RAM
Available OS Memory: 16324MB RAM
Page File: 5419MB used, 13336MB available
Windows Dir: C:\windows
DirectX Version: DirectX 11
DX Setup Parameters: Not found
User DPI Setting: Using System DPI
System DPI Setting: 96 DPI (100 percent)
DWM DPI Scaling: Disabled
DxDiag Version: 6.03.9600.16384 64bit Unicode
Card name: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 780
Manufacturer: NVIDIA
Chip type: GeForce GTX 780



Sorry for wall of text but I hope that this helps. The drivers should be up to date as I check it every day. The stuttering is more like, say, I open up chrome and go to youtube. I put on a video and open a new tab, and then it lags or stutters for about a second as it loads the page. I am currently downloading a game on steam and it happens more frequently now, even as I am not opening a new tab or even touching my computer at all - just listening to music, for example.

trjp
14-05-2014, 02:18 PM
So are we talking about network lag then? You're not being 100% clear about the problem really.

Steaming video/audio 'stuttering' is more likely a network issue but... are you using a Wifi or wired connection - have you run any network tests/speed tests etc?

Zelu
14-05-2014, 02:59 PM
It could very well be the network, but it seems very unlikely... The problem doesn't feel like a network problem, and it is also very hard to explain it. It is as if every time I load something, whether it be a new page on chrome or steam, I get a sort of lag. It is mostly noticable when I have some music or a video running in the background.

somini
14-05-2014, 03:18 PM
It could very well be the network, but it seems very unlikely... The problem doesn't feel like a network problem, and it is also very hard to explain it. It is as if every time I load something, whether it be a new page on chrome or steam, I get a sort of lag. It is mostly noticable when I have some music or a video running in the background.
If you have "lag" playing local videos it's not the network. Not sure about the drivers, I would be on hardware problems.

Zelu
14-05-2014, 04:10 PM
Update:

I tried installing the drivers for my motherboard and this seemed to do the trick. Realtek High Definition Audio Driver
Intel Chipset Driver.
Haven't recieved any lag at all after that.

Edit 2: A few hours after installing the drivers and trying to place some games, I seem to recieve the same issue once more. Could it be that my computer gets too heated? It is really odd.

trjp
14-05-2014, 09:21 PM
We really don't have enough to go on - solving problems like this requires detailed information and meaningful descriptions and actions taken in a structured way with measurable results.

How you 'feel' about your PC isn't useful - installing random drivers and saying they solved it" and then "unsolved it" tells us little (other than confirming we need an more objective measurement of the problem!)

The fact you didn't have basic things like motherboard drivers installed suggests there's plenty of scope for issues but it's really hard to know where to start.

Overheating? That's easy, install something which checks temps and report what you're seeing.

CoreTemp - http://www.alcpu.com/CoreTemp/ is a good start for the CPU - your GPU will have a manufacturer-specific tweak tool (MSI = Afterburner, Palit = ThunderMaster etc.) which will report GPU temps more reliably than anything else

The key to overheating isn't the actual temps per-se - it's that when you run a game they should rise and when you stop it they should fall back relatively quickly. If temps rise and keeping rising and or stay high after you stop playing, you have a problem.

Zelu
15-05-2014, 12:45 AM
I did try to see if it was an issue with overheating but I do not think so. The temps don't rise too high and they drop quickly when closing the game and returning to my desktop.

I did notice however that when I had installed the drivers that I did not have any issue anymore, though as soon as I hopped into a Skypecall, the lagging returned and remained even after I had quit the call.

trjp
15-05-2014, 03:42 AM
We're back into you 'thinking' stuff which isn't going to solve it. If the drivers had solved the problem, it wouldn't have come back when you made a call (or played a game or anything else). You clearly have either

a - an intermittent fault (worst kind - gl with it!)
b - a fault which isn't always obvious but IS always there, we just need to reproduce it consistently.

I think we need to do 2 things

1 - we need a repeatable set of steps which ALWAYS manifests the problem - that's the only way we'll ever know if we've solved it
2 - we need to reduce the number of variables involved (hardware and software) to narrow down a solution.

To that end, I suggest you try the following

1 - create a new user account on the PC (a normal user, not an admin, will be fine)
2 - power-off and remove all devices you don't absolutely need - you just want your PC, boot HDD, keyboard, mouse, monitor
3 - disconnect any network devices/cables/USB Wifi cards etc.
4 - power-on and login to the new user account and 'use' the PC for something - anything which works without the Network and is installed for that user - see if it misbehaves.

If it does

1 - describe the steps you took to make it misbehave and what happened
2 - restart the PC and repeat those steps - did it have the same issue?

At this point it'll help to open-up the Win8 equivalent of taskmgr/resmon - I don't have a Win8 PC to hand so someone else will need to point you to that - it's the thing which shows all the active processes/CPU usage etc (Search for 'task' should find it)

Given that you're on a 'clean' account you should only see offending processes - get some screenies of what's running and we'll work from there (yes, I'm thinking spyware/malware could be involved - but there are loads of other possibilities)