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Tom OBedlam
25-06-2011, 08:16 PM
Hullo!
My girlfriend is having trouble with getting games to run on her diddy netbook, does anyone have any good suggestions for low spec stuff she can play? She's mostly into management sims and platformers.

The JG Man
25-06-2011, 09:00 PM
The system requirements for Super Meat Boy (http://store.steampowered.com/app/40800/) are pretty damn low, but I wouldn't stand too close to her when she plays, otherwise she may throw the netbook at you by accident. Multiple times. If you have a controller that can be used, that would make things exceptionally easier. But no less painful for you.

I completely forgot! VVVVVV (http://store.steampowered.com/app/70300/)!

Tei
25-06-2011, 09:02 PM
http://www.desktopdungeons.net/

TychoCelchuuu
25-06-2011, 09:18 PM
X-COM is kind of a management sim.

Shark
25-06-2011, 09:28 PM
ahem...
http://rockpapershotgun.com/rpsforum/topic.php?id=29

Oak
25-06-2011, 10:06 PM
Tropico, maybe? It's cheap everywhere and ten years old.

Nihilille
26-06-2011, 12:13 AM
I'm sort of in this predicament right now as well because I'm working the night shift all summer and needed some games to pass the time with (I basically sit on my ass from 9pm to 7am making rounds every two hours) on my netbook. I found gog.com to be a good source because most games there are... well good old games with zero to no system requirements. Currently plowing through the Stygian Abyss together with the Avatar o/

hariseldon
26-06-2011, 12:50 AM
I can get GTA San Andreas running well enough on my netbook. Super Meat Boy is good but the slightest slowdown and it's impossible to play so not 100% sure it's netbookable. Might want to check out Terraria, Toki Tori, Gish, Crayon Physics for some coolness.

J Arcane
26-06-2011, 03:03 AM
GOG.com and DOSbox+Abandonia are godsends for the netbook-bound gamer. When I still had one, I pretty much only played Master of Magic, MOO2 and SimCity 2000.

Wizardry
26-06-2011, 04:30 AM
GOG.com and DOSbox+Abandonia are godsends for the netbook-bound gamer. When I still had one, I pretty much only played Master of Magic, MOO2 and SimCity 2000.
This, basically. All the best CRPGs came out in the late 80s and early 90s. So if she likes CRPGs then netbooks bring about no restrictions whatsoever. GOG.com has lots of good games, but it misses out on 90% of the good ones. Those you can usually find at abandonware sites.

TheLastBaron
28-06-2011, 03:05 AM
Most things on GoG will run just fine on a netbook, I just picked up HoMM I-III from them.
Also Terraria runs perfectly fine on a netbook.

Cooper
28-06-2011, 03:18 AM
There are a veritable plethora of games that will run on a netbook.

That old thread is a good place to start, anything that runs on DosBox too, so most of GoG.com and a few things on Steam.

Having used my samsung NC for a fair bit of gaming (it was my only computer for 6 months on fieldwork) here are some general tips for looking for games:

1) Supported resolutions
-SO- many games which can run fine on netbooks do not, because their minimum reoslution is 1024 x 768. Which is larger than most netbooks. Sure, many netbook screens scroll, but, trust me, you do NOT want to have a scrolling screen for any game.

2) Mouse or trackpad
Simply put, not having a mouse puts a whole raft of games as near impossible. I don't care what people suggest, any FPS is impossible on a trackpad.

That's about it.
Some games I run on my netbook:
Operation Flashpoint
Aliens Vs predator (original)
Deus Ex
Max Payne
Commandos 1&2
Sim City (2000, 3000 & 4)
Transport Tycoon

Etc. etc.

Gotem
28-06-2011, 04:40 PM
oh, you can lose many hours to Deadly Rooms of Death
http://caravelgames.com/Articles/Games.html
warning.. can be very addicting

Unaco
28-06-2011, 05:15 PM
This, basically. All the best CRPGs came out in the late 80s and early 90s. So if she likes CRPGs then netbooks bring about no restrictions whatsoever. GOG.com has lots of good games, but it misses out on 90% of the good ones. Those you can usually find at abandonware sites.

Wizardry, you think Ultima VII is a fantasy version of GTA (or vice-versa). I don't think you can talk about CRPG's.

Wizardry
28-06-2011, 05:21 PM
But Ultima VII isn't an RPG. It's an isometric action game with irrelevant statistics.

TheLastBaron
28-06-2011, 09:04 PM
For my netbook I've been using a trackball for playing games that require a mouse. I've found it works better when I'm somewhere where I don't have a large surface to scroll on.

raddevon
28-06-2011, 10:48 PM
This, basically. All the best CRPGs came out in the late 80s and early 90s. So if she likes CRPGs then netbooks bring about no restrictions whatsoever. GOG.com has lots of good games, but it misses out on 90% of the good ones. Those you can usually find at abandonware sites.
I would be interested to know which you think are the good ones and why. I'm trying to dig back into some older CRPGs since I was a young, stupid JRPG-fanboy back then.

Wizardry
29-06-2011, 02:24 AM
I would be interested to know which you think are the good ones and why. I'm trying to dig back into some older CRPGs since I was a young, stupid, JRPG-fanboy back then.
There are so many. A large chunk of them are the AD&D Gold Box engine games, distributed among four series. These are basically the old-school Infinity Engine equivalent, but unlike Baldur's Gate and Icewind Dale these feature true turn-based AD&D combat that has never really been surpassed.

Pool of Radiance series (Forgotten Realms)
Pool of Radiance (1988)
Curse of the Azure Bonds (1989)
Secret of the Silver Blades (1990)
Pools of Darkness (1991)

Savage Frontier series (Forgotten Realms)
Gateway to the Savage Frontier (1991)
Treasures of the Savage Frontier (1992)

Krynn series (Dragonlance)
Champions of Krynn (1990)
Death Knights of Krynn (1991)
The Dark Queen of Krynn (1992)

Buck Rogers series (Buck Rogers XXVC)
Countdown to Doomsday (1990)
Matrix Cubed (1992)

There is also a construction set released in 1993 called Forgotten Realms: Unlimited Adventures. There are possibly hundreds of scenarios created for it, some of which are proper AD&D module conversions of quality as high as the official games.

The same company that made the Gold Box engine then went on to make a new AD&D engine that ended up being used for two games using the Dark Sun setting. These games are graphically improved over the Gold Box games, while becoming exclusively top down.

Dark Sun duo
Dark Sun: Shattered Lands (1993)
Dark Sun: Wake of the Ravager (1994)

Other than that there were the two granddaddies of the genre, Wizardry and Ultima. Wizardry spawned 8 titles, but while the first 5 have wire-frame graphics and simplistic but mercilessly difficult gameplay, the last 3 happen to form a nice, neat, self-contained trilogy to play through. These games are first-person games that have turn-based combat and great character development systems.

The Dark Savant trilogy
Wizardry VI: Bane of the Cosmic Forge (1990)
Wizardry VII: Crusaders of the Dark Savant (1992)
Wizardry 8 (2001)

Similarly, Ultima spawned 10 games in its main series, with numerous spin-offs. Disregarding the very early and primitive games that add nothing to the lore, setting and story, as well as the later watered down games, Ultima can be broken down into one full trilogy, two spin-off series of two games each, and both parts of Ultima VII. All these games are large sandboxy games focusing far more on exploration and solving quests than playing around with numbers.

The Age of Enlightenment trilogy
Ultima IV: Quest of the Avatar (1985)
Ultima V: Warriors of Destiny (1988)
Ultima VI: The False Prophet (1990)

Ultima VII
Ultima VII: The Black Gate (1992)
Ultima VII: Serpent Isle (1993)

Worlds of Ultima series
Worlds of Ultima: The Savage Empire (1990)
Worlds of Ultima 2: Martian Dreams (1991)

Ultima Underworld series
Ultima Underworld: The Stygian Abyss (1992)
Ultima Underworld II: Labyrinth of Worlds (1993)

Then there's another big, long mega-series that started half a decade after Ultima and Wizardry, spawning 9 games. The Might and Magic series. The Heroes of Might and Magic series is a very popular spin-off series that started a decade later. The Might and Magic series is similar to Wizardry but with far quicker and less tactical combat, and with more freedom of movement. This series can be broken up nicely into three groups, split between eras.

Early-era Might and Magic games
Might and Magic I: The Secret of the Inner Sanctum (1986)
Might and Magic II: Gates to Another World (1988)

Mid-era Might and Magic games
Might and Magic III: Isles of Terra (1991)
Might and Magic IV: Clouds of Xeen (1992)
Might and Magic V: Darkside of Xeen (1993)

Late-era Might and Magic games
Might and Magic VI: The Mandate of Heaven (1998)
Might and Magic VII: For Blood and Honor (1999)
Might and Magic VIII: Day of the Destroyer (2000)

Then there are other small series of games like Realms of Arkania. This series is an adaptation of the German pen and paper RPG Das Schwarze Auge (The Dark Eye). Combat is turn-based and tactical, but not as much as the Gold Box games. Exploration is more free and with greater simulation of travel such as the wear and tear of shoes, and the effects of climate/weather.

Northlands trilogy
Realms of Arkania: Blade of Destiny (1992)
Realms of Arkania: Star Trail (1994)
Realms of Arkania: Shadows over Riva (1996)

There are also many single games that were fantastic. Darklands from 1992 is a Microprose CRPG that is text-driven but with a real-time with pause combat system back before Baldur's Gate was released. The game has great character creation/customisation and a myriad of options to choose from throughout the game. It's very open ended and sandboxy, while consisting mostly of text options over painted backgrounds. The game is set in the Holy Roman Empire and is very historically accurate, with many towns, cities and villages to visit that exist in real-life today.

Betrayal at Krondor is another well regarded CRPG from 1993. It is highly story driven, and perhaps one of the first games for storyfags. Exploration is done in 3D first-person, while the turn-based combat is performed on a grid. The game is broken up into multiple chapters, and in many ways reads like a book.

There are many more, but then I'll be heading into the realm of obscure gems, or even the realm of only-enjoyed-by-masochists. Should be enough for you.

Tom OBedlam
29-06-2011, 12:35 PM
Cool, thanks for the suggestions.

We're starting on Planescape: Torment first, she seems really interested in the story line so that seemed a good place to begin.

If she completes it I'll probably have to marry her though...

BobsLawnService
29-06-2011, 08:38 PM
There are so many. A large chunk of them are the AD&D Gold Box engine games, distributed among four series. These are basically the old-school Infinity Engine equivalent, but unlike Baldur's Gate and Icewind Dale these feature true turn-based AD&D combat that has never really been surpassed.

Pool of Radiance series (Forgotten Realms)
Pool of Radiance (1988)
Curse of the Azure Bonds (1989)
Secret of the Silver Blades (1990)
Pools of Darkness (1991)

Savage Frontier series (Forgotten Realms)
Gateway to the Savage Frontier (1991)
Treasures of the Savage Frontier (1992)

Krynn series (Dragonlance)
Champions of Krynn (1990)
Death Knights of Krynn (1991)
The Dark Queen of Krynn (1992)

Buck Rogers series (Buck Rogers XXVC)
Countdown to Doomsday (1990)
Matrix Cubed (1992)

There is also a construction set released in 1993 called Forgotten Realms: Unlimited Adventures. There are possibly hundreds of scenarios created for it, some of which are proper AD&D module conversions of quality as high as the official games.

The same company that made the Gold Box engine then went on to make a new AD&D engine that ended up being used for two games using the Dark Sun setting. These games are graphically improved over the Gold Box games, while becoming exclusively top down.

Dark Sun duo
Dark Sun: Shattered Lands (1993)
Dark Sun: Wake of the Ravager (1994)

Other than that there were the two granddaddies of the genre, Wizardry and Ultima. Wizardry spawned 8 titles, but while the first 5 have wire-frame graphics and simplistic but mercilessly difficult gameplay, the last 3 happen to form a nice, neat, self-contained trilogy to play through. These games are first-person games that have turn-based combat and great character development systems.

The Dark Savant trilogy
Wizardry VI: Bane of the Cosmic Forge (1990)
Wizardry VII: Crusaders of the Dark Savant (1992)
Wizardry 8 (2001)

Similarly, Ultima spawned 10 games in its main series, with numerous spin-offs. Disregarding the very early and primitive games that add nothing to the lore, setting and story, as well as the later watered down games, Ultima can be broken down into one full trilogy, two spin-off series of two games each, and both parts of Ultima VII. All these games are large sandboxy games focusing far more on exploration and solving quests than playing around with numbers.

The Age of Enlightenment trilogy
Ultima IV: Quest of the Avatar (1985)
Ultima V: Warriors of Destiny (1988)
Ultima VI: The False Prophet (1990)

Ultima VII
Ultima VII: The Black Gate (1992)
Ultima VII: Serpent Isle (1993)

Worlds of Ultima series
Worlds of Ultima: The Savage Empire (1990)
Worlds of Ultima 2: Martian Dreams (1991)

Ultima Underworld series
Ultima Underworld: The Stygian Abyss (1992)
Ultima Underworld II: Labyrinth of Worlds (1993)

Then there's another big, long mega-series that started half a decade after Ultima and Wizardry, spawning 9 games. The Might and Magic series. The Heroes of Might and Magic series is a very popular spin-off series that started a decade later. The Might and Magic series is similar to Wizardry but with far quicker and less tactical combat, and with more freedom of movement. This series can be broken up nicely into three groups, split between eras.

Early-era Might and Magic games
Might and Magic I: The Secret of the Inner Sanctum (1986)
Might and Magic II: Gates to Another World (1988)

Mid-era Might and Magic games
Might and Magic III: Isles of Terra (1991)
Might and Magic IV: Clouds of Xeen (1992)
Might and Magic V: Darkside of Xeen (1993)

Late-era Might and Magic games
Might and Magic VI: The Mandate of Heaven (1998)
Might and Magic VII: For Blood and Honor (1999)
Might and Magic VIII: Day of the Destroyer (2000)

Then there are other small series of games like Realms of Arkania. This series is an adaptation of the German pen and paper RPG Das Schwarze Auge (The Dark Eye). Combat is turn-based and tactical, but not as much as the Gold Box games. Exploration is more free and with greater simulation of travel such as the wear and tear of shoes, and the effects of climate/weather.

Northlands trilogy
Realms of Arkania: Blade of Destiny (1992)
Realms of Arkania: Star Trail (1994)
Realms of Arkania: Shadows over Riva (1996)

There are also many single games that were fantastic. Darklands from 1992 is a Microprose CRPG that is text-driven but with a real-time with pause combat system back before Baldur's Gate was released. The game has great character creation/customisation and a myriad of options to choose from throughout the game. It's very open ended and sandboxy, while consisting mostly of text options over painted backgrounds. The game is set in the Holy Roman Empire and is very historically accurate, with many towns, cities and villages to visit that exist in real-life today.

Betrayal at Krondor is another well regarded CRPG from 1993. It is highly story driven, and perhaps one of the first games for storyfags. Exploration is done in 3D first-person, while the turn-based combat is performed on a grid. The game is broken up into multiple chapters, and in many ways reads like a book.

There are many more, but then I'll be heading into the realm of obscure gems, or even the realm of only-enjoyed-by-masochists. Should be enough for you.

No mention of the MegaTraveller games? Wizardry, you are no RPG guru. You're a charlatan and a fraud...