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View Full Version : How come South Korea barely does SP games?



NoodleFighter
15-10-2012, 11:51 PM
They really seem to show talent with games like Lineage Eternal, Ein Epicus Incognitus, Blade & Soul, and etc. IT seems the only Korean dev that I'm aware of that has done singleplayer games is Bluesides (creators of Kingdom under fires).

Japan has really gone down hill and lost a lot of relevance, this looks like a chance to start getting better recognition they seem pretty capable.

gundato
15-10-2012, 11:55 PM
I think it is a question of demand. In their market, the best way to make a buck is multiplayer.

Also, multiplayer games are a much safer bet in any region with lots of piracy (no idea if South Korea is one of them). People will pirate an SP game, but they generally won't pirate MP (since they would only be able to play with other pirates).

pakoito
16-10-2012, 12:10 AM
Online videogames as substitution for #r_l social interaction? Dunno. SKs I've met so far looked very sociable, by asian standards.

OrangyTang
16-10-2012, 12:38 AM
There's probably a whole heap of issues but the main one is probably this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Censorship_of_Japanese_media_in_South_Korea

Consoles were effectively banned until 2001, so they've got a big pc background. And piracy rates are high so pc games companies focus on MMOs. It probably helps that internet cafes are widespread and don't have the same stigma that they do here as well.

http://www.nationmaster.com/graph/cri_sof_pir_rat-crime-software-piracy-rate

SirKicksalot
16-10-2012, 12:51 AM
There's probably a whole heap of issues but the main one is probably this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Censorship_of_Japanese_media_in_South_Korea



This is incredible.

Bork Titflopsen
16-10-2012, 03:01 AM
It probably helps that internet cafes are widespread and don't have the same stigma that they do here as well.

Mostly this I think. South Koreans really don't game much at home since there are internet cafes on every street corner and it's much easier (and thus more cost effective) to drop in and out of a a multiplayer game, or only play it for short amounts of time.

Don't forget that this is a country where 'competitive gamer' is a viable career choice, to the extent that their airforce (I think) has it's own Starcraft team so people don't loose their jobs when they get drafted for conscription. This is a country where people go to the bar to watch Streetfighter finals instead of [insert sport here]. Being good at a multiplayer game gives you some status.

Moraven
16-10-2012, 05:59 AM
Mostly this I think. South Koreans really don't game much at home since there are internet cafes on every street corner and it's much easier (and thus more cost effective) to drop in and out of a a multiplayer game, or only play it for short amounts of time.

Don't forget that this is a country where 'competitive gamer' is a viable career choice, to the extent that their airforce (I think) has it's own Starcraft team so people don't loose their jobs when they get drafted for conscription. This is a country where people go to the bar to watch Streetfighter finals instead of [insert sport here]. Being good at a multiplayer game gives you some status.

http://wiki.teamliquid.net/starcraft/Air_Force_ACE

Mohorovicic
16-10-2012, 06:39 AM
Mostly this I think. South Koreans really don't game much at home since there are internet cafes on every street corner and it's much easier (and thus more cost effective) to drop in and out of a a multiplayer game, or only play it for short amounts of time.

This. Net cafes are so widespread in Korea that most people don't even own gaming PCs there, since if they want to play something they can just hit a cafe. With your chracter being stored server-side it doesn't even matter which one, as long as it has the client of the game you want to play.

I guess it's kind of a circle, nobody gets gaming PCs or makes PC games because everyone uses net cafes, and everyone uses net cafes because there's not enough incentive to invest in proper gaming gear.


Don't forget that this is a country where 'competitive gamer' is a viable career choice, to the extent that their airforce (I think) has it's own Starcraft team so people don't loose their jobs when they get drafted for conscription. This is a country where people go to the bar to watch Streetfighter finals instead of [insert sport here]. Being good at a multiplayer game gives you some status.

Well, it's as much of a viable career choice as any other sport. So depending on your personal skill and circumstances it can vary from "swimming in cash and whores" to "I am now 30 and too old to do the sport anymore, I was never good enough to win any medals or cash and I have no previous job experience and/or education"

Bork Titflopsen
16-10-2012, 02:03 PM
Well, it's as much of a viable career choice as any other sport. So depending on your personal skill and circumstances it can vary from "swimming in cash and whores" to "I am now 30 and too old to do the sport anymore, I was never good enough to win any medals or cash and I have no previous job experience and/or education"

Sure, but the reason I mentioned it is because over here (Holland) people will look at you funny if you tell them you want to be a professional gamer when you grow up, but telling them you want to become a professional soccer player is perfectly acceptable. It shows the difference in attitude people have towards the subject.

gundato
16-10-2012, 02:08 PM
Also, I think competitive gaming has less of an age factor. EA semi-regularly does posts and links to articles on "old people" (over 60) who play BF3 and are actually pretty competent.

So that is one advantage the "sport" of gaming has over most professional "sports".

OrangyTang
16-10-2012, 02:10 PM
"swimming in cash and whores"

Rumour has it that this will be an event in the next Olympic games.

NoodleFighter
16-10-2012, 05:42 PM
Hmm I see but what about having multiplayer modes like Kingdom Under Fires 2 is doing, or just trying to get the game as available to outside countries as possible if piracy is that big of a deal.

Lukasz
16-10-2012, 05:50 PM
This is incredible.

Considering what Japan did and tried to do to the country no surprise here. good that they are removing those laws step by step.


are japan video games really irrelevant?