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  1. #1
    Network Hub sopabuena's Avatar
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    Getting a new gaming PC

    It's that time again, I'm ready to replace my current PC wich gave 4+ years of solid gaming for a new gaming rig.
    I have to big concerns: I'm absolutelly ignorant of which are today's standars and, secondly, with the next-gen consoles around the corner I would like a PC that can play most of those games for the comming years.

    Looking around the website from the guys I got my last PC from I found the following machine, what do you guys think?

    MB: Gigabyte GA-277-DS3H
    RAM 8 GB Kingston Hyper X
    Intel Core i7-3770
    ATI Radeon HD 7870

    Of course most of the parts are upgradable, but it's already quite pricey at it is. What would you swap?

  2. #2
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Sakkura's Avatar
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    I would downgrade the CPU to a Core i5-3570K if possible.
    The RAM is fine if it's DDR3-1600 or above, and runs at less than 1.65V.
    The graphics card is good, though if they offer an upgrade to a 7870 XT it may be better to take that upgrade. Assuming pricing is sane down there; the 7870 XT shouldn't cost much more.

    Make sure you're getting a decent power supply, it's the easiest place for them to cut corners, and it's where it can cause you the most grief.

  3. #3
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Grizzly's Avatar
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  4. #4
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    I'm not trying to be that "HURR JUST BUILD ONE" guy that appears in all of these threads, but I'm genuinely surprised by the amount of people on here that buy pre-built machines. It's just a bit strange to me, like a car enthusiast who doesn't like to work on his own vehicles. It would be interesting to know the price of what you are looking to buy, and then see how much the parts sell for individually, just to see how true the old "You can save hundreds by building yourself" line really is. Again, I don't mean to rip you, and I understand that some people just don't have the know how, time, or desire to build. I'm just surprised to see so many of them.
    "What were we talking about? Pegasuses, pegasii, that's horses with wings. This motherf*cker got a sword that talks to him. Motherf*cker live in places that don't exist, it comes with a map. My God."

  5. #5
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Grizzly's Avatar
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    I'm just surprised to see so many of them.
    Well, I think the main reason for that is that the people who build their own PCs usually do not need help. They already know from other sources what the best hardware for their budget is, and if they do need help, they usually ask for advice on forums which are dedicated to the subject, such as Tom's Hardware or overclocking.net (or whatever it was called). So you don't find them on this forum.

    You actually find very few people on this forum, now that I think of it. It's got like five regulars.
    Last edited by Grizzly; 29-03-2013 at 03:09 PM.

  6. #6
    Network Hub slick_101's Avatar
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    I would say don't do it yet. Haswell is round the corner aka June this year and they're going to LGA 1150 which means LGA 1155 is a dead socket.
    Official RPS Thread argument catalyst.

  7. #7
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Sakkura's Avatar
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    On the other hand, Haswell will only barely be a bigger upgrade than Ivy Bridge was.

  8. #8
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Grizzly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by slick_101 View Post
    I would say don't do it yet. Haswell is round the corner aka June this year and they're going to LGA 1150 which means LGA 1155 is a dead socket.
    By the time you need to upgrade your haswell, LGA 1150 will most likely be a dead socket as well. Look at the sandy bridge chips: They are almost identical to ivy bridge performance wise, and a i5-2500K is nowhere near outdated.

  9. #9
    Network Hub sopabuena's Avatar
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    Well I did I use to be into building my own PCs back in the time.
    The thing is that I'm completely clueless about today's stadards. And time is an important factor, I'm on my second year of medical residence and I just want to come home and be able to play a game I want.

    Thanks for all the replies.

    Also I've never had an ATI card before, just nVidia, what would be the equivalent nVidia card?

  10. #10
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Sakkura's Avatar
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    The 7870 is slightly faster than the Geforce GTX 660 (on average, it varies from game to game).

  11. #11
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    I would suggest downgrading that processor to i5-3570k (or even lower) and put more money into the graphics card.

    Before New Years, I still used a Core2Duo E6600. It was six years old. Or something like that. It was paired with a Geforce GTX 460. Now, granted, I'm only playing in 1680x1050 but that rig could play anything i threw at it. Mostly. With the latest shooters coming out these past six months, when lots of things happened on the screen, the CPU just couldn't handle it.

    So shortly after New Years, I bought an i3570k. I'm a bit upset about not being able to play Crysis 3 at the absolute maxed out settings without getting below 30 fps, but I think the ol' GTX 460 deserves some credit. It is old by now, like two years or something, and it can't quite handle it no more. I was thinking of getting a monitor with higher resolution anyway. Why not a new graphics card as well? yay!

    Long story short: You can buy an i3 and still have to replace the graphics card before the CPU. Put more money into graphics.

  12. #12
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus L_No's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fohria View Post
    Long story short: You can buy an i3 and still have to replace the graphics card before the CPU. Put more money into graphics.
    I'd agree with fohria, the CPU usually doesn't seem to be the bottleneck (unless it's really old or slow).

  13. #13
    Get an SSD, will change your life.

  14. #14
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    I decided on an i5-3550, the premium for the 3570k at the time didn't seem worth it.

    Also, the Newegg PSU calculator seems way - it's suggesting 483w for an i5 3550, 8gb ram, dvd-rw, 7870 and 3 HDDs.

    Anandtech tested three different 7870's (stock and max overclock) with an overclocked i7 3960x, 16gb RAM, a high end SLI mobo and an SSD and even overclocked, the total system power consumption didn't break 350w.

    People tend to overspend and overbuy on PSU's, unless you're running SLI/CF you're unlikely to need more than 450w.

  15. #15
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    Speaking of, I just installed a new PSU, a third HDD and a DVD-RW (previously running an OCZ 450w modstream PSU, an SSD, a 2TB HD and no optical drive).

    Idle @ desktop with 0% hdd/cpu usage with OCZ 450w PSU: 62.9w
    Furmark burn in test: 230w

    Idle @ desktop with 0%hdd/cpu, extra HDD and DVD-RW with Antec EA Platinum certified 450w PSU: 51w
    Furmark burn in test: 197w

  16. #16
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus mashakos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vicious View Post
    I decided on an i5-3550, the premium for the 3570k at the time didn't seem worth it.

    Also, the Newegg PSU calculator seems way - it's suggesting 483w for an i5 3550, 8gb ram, dvd-rw, 7870 and 3 HDDs.

    Anandtech tested three different 7870's (stock and max overclock) with an overclocked i7 3960x, 16gb RAM, a high end SLI mobo and an SSD and even overclocked, the total system power consumption didn't break 350w. So that 350w might not be the absolute limit, the CPU could push it to 400w or 450w if taxed hard enough.

    People tend to overspend and overbuy on PSU's, unless you're running SLI/CF you're unlikely to need more than 450w.
    The most expensive PSU's out there have a guaranteed 85% efficiency, as in the most expensive 450w PSU will provide a stable 382.5W of power, after that it will either fry your motherboard or just implode.

    FYI: overclocked cpu's don't draw power at a sustained rate, they pull below 50w on idle but can suck in up to 200w for short bursts on load.
    From experience, I don't go below an 80w PSU if I am planning to serious overclock the PC. The 800w PSU is not for the wattage but rather the extra cooling and redudancy built in due to the higher cost - cheaper PSU's have none of that and with overclocking raising ambient temps inside the case it's better to be safe than sorry.
    Last edited by mashakos; 18-04-2013 at 04:03 PM.
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  17. #17
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Sakkura's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mashakos View Post
    The most expensive PSU's out there have a guaranteed 85% efficiency, as in the most expensive 450w PSU will provide a stable 382.5W of power, after that it will either fry your motherboard or just implode.
    That's not how it works.

    A 450W power supply running at 85% efficiency - which is NOT the guaranteed efficiency of the most expensive PSUs - will provide up to 450W sustained power to the components (plus typically another 10-15%, but that's beyond what you're promised), while drawing ~529W from the socket. PSUs are rated by the power they deliver to components, not the power they draw from the wall.

    The highest-rated PSUs are the ones that are 80+ Titanium certified. This means they're at least 90% efficient at loads ranging from 10% to 100%.

    Overloading a PSU will not make it fry your motherboard or implode, unless it's a bad power supply. Good ones will simply shut down once they sense that the current (or power) drawn is too high.

    Using a higher-wattage PSU means efficiency will be LOWER, which isn't going to help you at all when overclocking or when trying to make a quiet system. Plus a poor 800W PSU will often fall short of what a quality 500W PSU can deliver. It is important not to focus blindly on wattage; quality is much more important.

  18. #18
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus mashakos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sakkura View Post
    That's not how it works.

    A 450W power supply running at 85% efficiency - which is NOT the guaranteed efficiency of the most expensive PSUs - will provide up to 450W sustained power to the components (plus typically another 10-15%, but that's beyond what you're promised), while drawing ~529W from the socket.
    you just flipped the numbers around. While it will draw about 529W from the socket, it will be pushing highly unregulated 450w to your components. Guess what happens when irregular voltage goes to your motherboard and components? Voltage spikes and hence, frying.

    This happened to me before, with an Enermax 500w.
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  19. #19
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Sakkura's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mashakos View Post
    you just flipped the numbers around. While it will draw about 529W from the socket, it will be pushing highly unregulated 450w to your components. Guess what happens when irregular voltage goes to your motherboard and components? Voltage spikes and hence, frying.

    This happened to me before, with an Enermax 500w.
    Yes, I flipped the numbers to the CORRECT orientation. You had it backwards. A PSU rated for 450W is rated to provide 450W to the components. So it won't go out of spec unless it's a crappy PSU. Most quality PSUs will even go at least 10% over their spec while still providing clean power to components (within the ATX specification limits).

  20. #20
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus mashakos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sakkura View Post
    Yes, I flipped the numbers to the CORRECT orientation. You had it backwards. A PSU rated for 450W is rated to provide 450W to the components. So it won't go out of spec unless it's a crappy PSU. Most quality PSUs will even go at least 10% over their spec while still providing clean power to components (within the ATX specification limits).
    quick question: have you done any serious overclocking - above 4.0GHz, 4.5Ghz - on an intel dual core or quad core in the past 6 years?
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