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  1. #21
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    I should also add that my PC once shutdown - when playing the Space Marine demo, in fact - and a quick look showed the CPU fan to be SOLID fluff.

    Cleaning it out, the running temp of the PC dropped over 10 degrees :)

    Oddly, my old 5670 was always dust-free (big spacious fan) but this 650 TI Boost has a faffy cooler which will need defluffing a fair bit I reckon.

    Time for a new case too - with the modular cables it now looks like an explosion in a parts cupboard...

  2. #22
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus neema_t's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chorltonwheelie View Post
    Regularly vacuum and air dust everything in your case.
    I once saw a 10c drop in temp on my cpu after using a soft paintbrush to clean the fan fins!
    My old Themaltake 500w benefited from doing this often. My lovely new GS800 doesn't start the fan 'till it's under an awful lot of load and seems to keep itself cleaner.

    You should see the state of my net curtains though.
    You shouldn't really vacuum sensitive electronics, they generate static electricity and can (but don't always) kill stuff. I know a lot of people who think it's bullshit as they've gotten away with it before but the fact is it's still possible and in any case, taking your PC outside with a can of compressed air gets it far cleaner than a vacuum cleaner ever could. If you're looking for an excuse to replace anything in your PC by all means get the Hoover on it, but if you've just bought something expensive... You might want to not.

  3. #23
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    Plastic vac nozzles are AOK inside a case IMO - they won't carry any more static charge than you would.

    I'd not get too close to components tho - you're as likely to knock/suck one loose as you are to static-shock it.

    Cleaning a PC outside is not without it's risks - I was cleaning some keyboards outside once when a pigeon shat in one - and I can tell you that's not possible to remove :)

  4. #24
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Heliocentric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by trjp View Post
    Cleaning a PC outside is not without it's risks - I was cleaning some keyboards outside once when a pigeon shat in one - and I can tell you that's not possible to remove :)
    Go boot up GTA 4 and get pigeon shooting.
    It won't help but you'll feel better.
    I'm failing to writing a blog, specifically about playing games the wrong way
    http://playingitwrong.wordpress.com/

  5. #25
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    Hi all.

    Not to hijack this thread but I can't post threads of my own in this forums (I guess it's a post count thing). I've recently built a new PC (everything except RAM purchased from Aria) and I'm getting a lot of BSOD's a black screen's when the pc is under load (games).

    I bought an XFX XXX PRO 650w (semi modular) as it had good reviews and props for using SeaSonic OEM. It also looked plenty of power for 770 / 4770k. However, the PSU fan has quickly developed a fan ticking noise, and now it's getting worse the longer the pc is on. Everything is secured and mounted correctly. When playing games, it's only a matter of time until a black screen cut out, then an auto-reboot. Recently it's started cutting out, then re-appearing claiming the vid card driver crashed. However, it BSOD's soon after this even if i'm just browsing the web.

    Basically, I was wondering if you guys think I should send it straight back, or take it to my local pc shop where they said they'd do a load test on it? (so I don't have to wait what potentially could be weeks for an RMA).

    CPU and GPU temps are normal in games, i'm almost certain it's the PSU. Several other people have mentioned these XFX's making this ticking noise, somebody in the comments thread for RPS's budget 500 pc.

  6. #26
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Sakkura's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by trjp View Post
    I should also add that my PC once shutdown - when playing the Space Marine demo, in fact - and a quick look showed the CPU fan to be SOLID fluff.

    Cleaning it out, the running temp of the PC dropped over 10 degrees :)

    Oddly, my old 5670 was always dust-free (big spacious fan) but this 650 TI Boost has a faffy cooler which will need defluffing a fair bit I reckon.

    Time for a new case too - with the modular cables it now looks like an explosion in a parts cupboard...
    Maybe the Sandia cooler will make this less of a problem in the not too distant future. It's pretty cool.

    Quote Originally Posted by vavaboom View Post
    Basically, I was wondering if you guys think I should send it straight back, or take it to my local pc shop where they said they'd do a load test on it? (so I don't have to wait what potentially could be weeks for an RMA).
    Certainly seems like the fastest way to find out. There are some places they cross-ship RMAs, but that's a pretty rare luxury.
    Last edited by Sakkura; 24-06-2013 at 08:06 PM.

  7. #27
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    My approach with 'might be faulty' items is normally to find/order a replacement - test to see if that solves the problem - if it does, RMA the potentially faulty one, if not - return the replacement under the DSR :)

    Your local PC shop is unlikely to be able to test a PSU anymore than you can - all they'll do is try to sell you a new one and/or charge you to 'test' it in one of their PCs

    My experiences with Aria and returns are BAD - sadly - they took 4 weeks to declare something I returned as 'AOK' - I had to pay to get it back and it was still faulty on arrival - took a letter to Trading Standards to get my postage refunded but the item was never replaced.

    Therefore I'd be VERY VERY sure it's the PSU before you start down that road - a noisy fan is one thing but if it IS the fan, that doesn't necessarily point to an actual fault in the PSU itself!?

    I'd get another PSU - from somewhere else perhaps - and see if it solves the problem - if it does, RMA the XFX - if it doesn't - erm...

    I had my eye on an XFX PSU too - you've scuppered that plan!
    Last edited by trjp; 24-06-2013 at 10:53 PM.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by trjp View Post
    My approach with 'might be faulty' items is normally to find/order a replacement - test to see if that solves the problem - if it does, RMA the potentially faulty one, if not - return the replacement under the DSR :)

    Your local PC shop is unlikely to be able to test a PSU anymore than you can - all they'll do is try to sell you a new one and/or charge you to 'test' it in one of their PCs

    My experiences with Aria and returns are BAD - sadly - they took 4 weeks to declare something I returned as 'AOK' - I had to pay to get it back and it was still faulty on arrival - took a letter to Trading Standards to get my postage refunded but the item was never replaced.

    Therefore I'd be VERY VERY sure it's the PSU before you start down that road - a noisy fan is one thing but if it IS the fan, that doesn't necessarily point to an actual fault in the PSU itself!?

    I'd get another PSU - from somewhere else perhaps - and see if it solves the problem - if it does, RMA the XFX - if it doesn't - erm...

    I had my eye on an XFX PSU too - you've scuppered that plan!
    Thanks a lot for the reply :)

    Yeah, that's why I'm hesitant to just ship it off. I want to be positive it's the PSU, but this fan sound isn't just it being noisy, it makes slightly worrying tick sounds.

    I've got a ton (24) of "kernel power" critical errors (Event ID: 41) which I suppose would point to the PSU. I'm praying to god it's the PSU as it's so depressing to build a brand new machine and then have something wrong with it (for the third time!). I was also skeptical the PC shop would do much more then I would, also Aria seem to be very harsh on refunding your return costs. I don't want to send it back, wait 4 weeks, and then have them declare it perfectly find and charge me for sending it back.

    Also I'm not sure whether to describe it as a ticking sound or a buzzing sound. As the fan is facing down (bottom mounted) it's hard to tell whether it is indeed the fan making this noise or the PSU itself
    Last edited by vavaboom; 25-06-2013 at 03:08 PM.

  9. #29
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    I've hovered around the issue of buying a PSU Tester of some sort for years now - but I never seem to have QUITE enough work around to justify it.

    The $6-$12 eBay specials are really only good enough to spot broken connectors or rails - and you could do that with a paperclip and a multimeter (no risk - the current is tiny on the sharp end)

    For more like $30-40 you can get a proper 'load simulating' PSU tester which will spot most intermittant/load-related faults in a PSU

    Thing is tho - even if you spot one, you still have to survive the returns process...

    The only time I wished I'd jumped is when I had the PC which was actually killing PSUs (not the other way around) - it took 3 PSUs to realise what was happening there - I could have saved money on that occasion!!

  10. #30
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    One thing to note is this system seems fine for general web browsing, but this ticking is more audible then I feel comfortable with. It's not till I play WoW *hangs head in shame* that it actually black screens.

  11. #31
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    I needed to power-up my old desktop today - had to test something in XP and it's my last XP system - and I thought I'd stick the Watt Meter on that for a laugh.

    It's an old P4HT so a power-hungry thing - useful for heating the office in winter tho! At idle it uses well over 100W - usually between 110 and 140W in fact.

    Running Prime95 and Furmark pushed that straight over 200W with a peak of 240W

    I say peak when I mean "and the PC locked solid" at 240W - given that it has an old 280W PSU (no brand - likely 240W was asking a lot of it) :)

    As I say tho - heats the office beautifully...

  12. #32
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Boris's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by trjp View Post
    I needed to power-up my old desktop today - had to test something in XP and it's my last XP system - and I thought I'd stick the Watt Meter on that for a laugh.

    It's an old P4HT so a power-hungry thing - useful for heating the office in winter tho! At idle it uses well over 100W - usually between 110 and 140W in fact.

    Running Prime95 and Furmark pushed that straight over 200W with a peak of 240W

    I say peak when I mean "and the PC locked solid" at 240W - given that it has an old 280W PSU (no brand - likely 240W was asking a lot of it) :)

    As I say tho - heats the office beautifully...
    Well, yes and no. PSU ratings are supposed to be what they can deliver, not what they suck from the wall. You measured what they suck from the wall, which is always more due to inefficiencies. Still, the P4's a power hungry beast and you can probably replace it and save quite a bit on the electricity bill.

  13. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boris View Post
    Well, yes and no. PSU ratings are supposed to be what they can deliver, not what they suck from the wall. You measured what they suck from the wall, which is always more due to inefficiencies. Still, the P4's a power hungry beast and you can probably replace it and save quite a bit on the electricity bill.
    I realise that a 280W PSU which is 80% efficient could, in theory, draw 350W from the wall (80% of 350 being 280) - I also realise that the 280W is calculated by adding-up the most it can deliver on all the connections it has and that a crash is more likely down to

    a - one of the voltages being off
    b - just an overall lack of power in the device

    e.g. the Wattage of a PSU is usually bollocks :)

  14. #34
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Sakkura's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by trjp View Post
    I realise that a 280W PSU which is 80% efficient could, in theory, draw 350W from the wall (80% of 350 being 280) - I also realise that the 280W is calculated by adding-up the most it can deliver on all the connections it has and that a crash is more likely down to

    a - one of the voltages being off
    b - just an overall lack of power in the device

    e.g. the Wattage of a PSU is usually bollocks :)
    It's not just in theory but in practice too. The problem with yours is probably either that it was overrated by a disreputable vendor, or that capacitor aging has made it weaker than it used to be. Or both. The 280W is not calculated by adding up the maximum it can deliver on each rail, that would lead to a much higher total.

    Example:



    The sum of the bottom row is 676.5W. The sum of the second row, multiplied by the nominal voltages, is 745.7W. But the PSU is only rated for a total power draw of 550W.

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