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  1. #1401
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    Quote Originally Posted by Voon View Post
    I was meaning to buy a book by Haruki Murakami but I'm not sure which one to pick. The ones I know are Kafka on the Shore, Dance Dance Dance, Norwegian Wood (or I think so) and a few other which titles I forgot. Should I get a book by him or should I get Snuff by Pratchett instead?
    I'd say you can't go wrong with any of his books as his writing style is quite coherent. If you like fantasy or little bit of paranormal I would recommend Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World, Dance Dance Dance or The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle. If you fancy yourself more non-fiction literature you might like Underground or Norwegian Wood.
    After that, you'll see if you like his writing and if so you might end up reading all his books as every each one of them has something special in them that will make you read them cover-to-cover :) Yeah, I do love his work.

    I just re-read Norwegian Wood, first time in english, and since it's been some time from my last read I was [spoiler] again infuriated by the ending! [/spoiler].

    Also, I just finished The Great Gatsby and I don't really understand what all the fuss is about? I just didn't find it all that exciting or revolutionary. *confused* I shall re-read it next week in my native language just to be sure there wasn't something I missed or didn't catch but I doubt it will be any better.
    GW2: Eknurr (Lvl 80 Engi), Elaina Mischievous (Lvl 80 Ranger), Neeaha (Lvl 80 Mesmer), Bald Carl (Lvl 80 Guardian)

  2. #1402
    Network Hub Rath's Avatar
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    Apparently the DTI have a motto - all time travel incidents eventually lead back to James T. Kirk. The man was a menace.

  3. #1403
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Jesus_Phish's Avatar
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    I picked up The Daylight War by Peter V Brett this weekend. I was really looking forward to this book, but so far there's something about it that's just not doing it for me. It's like the writing style has changed and everything has been ramped up to eleven, but not for the better. For anyone unfamiliar, it's the third and newest entry in his series The Demon Cycle. Whats struck me as strange is that
    1 - Two of the main characters from the previous books seem to talk like they're from the deep south. While they did this previously every so often, I don't remember them doing it nearly as much as they are now. Every other sentence seems to contain extra apostrophes in place of letters.
    2 - The prologue at the start contains language and actions that I really really do not remember being mentioned at all in the previous two books.

    Now I'll admit, it's been a year maybe since I read the first two back to back, but I don't think I'd be so surprised by it unless it's different. I'm not finding myself enjoying it as much, but I'm only about an eight of the way through it. I'm hoping it will get better.

  4. #1404
    Obscure Node Thuull's Avatar
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    The Summoner, but Gail Z. Martin, cuz I dig Necromancers. Wish the book were better though.

  5. #1405
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus coldvvvave's Avatar
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    China Mieville - Perdido Street Station

    Another "steam/cyber/diesel/bio/magic/something -punk London", this time MAXIMUM DISGUSTING, every object in this book is either slimy, dirty, contaminated or covered in fecal matter( authors favorite). So it's your typical urban fantasy but it has a charming bunch of middle aged liberal art-intelligentsia as heroes/protagonists which is kind of cool because I absolutely love liberal art-intelligentsia, they are the funniest people, usually insane and/or incapable of survival without tight government control they hate so much. They are exactly the types I rarely see in sci-fi/fantasy novels but often irl. Here they are social outcasts, unemployed, occassional drug-users, hate government, hate leos, have links with organised crime( surprise!) and are scum in other ways, but charming scum.
    Last edited by coldvvvave; 19-02-2013 at 01:55 PM.
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  6. #1406
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Zephro's Avatar
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    I'm currently reading The Invention of Tradition:
    http://books.google.co.uk/books/abou...d=sfvnNdVY3KIC

    It's a series of essays edited by Eric Hobsbawm on the invention of tradition, usually for reasons of political power over the last couple centuries. Essays cover the invention of Scottish Highland traditions, the pageantry of the royal family, attempts at creating traditions in colonial india and africa, and also the working class.

    Anyway also reading Judge Dredd: The Complete Case Files 3 to balance it all out.

  7. #1407
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus L_No's Avatar
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    Reading The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy again. Absolutely hilarious.

  8. #1408
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus sabrage's Avatar
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    I finally went out and bought Infinite Jest, having checked it out from the library with intention to read and never even entertaining the notion of starting it. I'm only 60 pages or so in, so the intricacies of structure haven't made themselves apparent to me so much as the annoyance of having a 1000-page novel with 3 different bookmarks, a dictionary and a phone to decode it have.

    Since my Infinite Jest reading apparatus isn't exactly portable, I'm alternating Walden, Invisible Cities (...again,) and Omar Khayyám's Rubáiyát. I like DFW, but his haphazard Rolodex of styles (including an ill-conceived attempt at ebonics) isn't always as nourishing as his themes.

  9. #1409
    Network Hub Rath's Avatar
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    I've just finished MAUL by Tricia Sullivan, and I don't know whether to blame her, Orbit publishing, or presumably their one under-qualified proofreader for the fact that there were at least two instances in the book where "of" was used in place of "have". Also, the plot is all over the shop and the characterisation erratic. I am not happy with this book at all. No sir.

  10. #1410
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Similar's Avatar
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    Finished Jon Ronson's The Men Who Stare At Goats and I'm not sure what to think. It's a bit like the way it's written stops it from having much impact. It feels sort of too casual somehow. Still worth reading, though.

  11. #1411
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Drake Sigar's Avatar
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    Lone Wolf: http://www.projectaon.org/en/Main/Home

    Having stuff transfer over from each book with a degree of continuity and a main story that revolved around unlocking more power was genius, it really encourages you to buy the whole series. I don't know if there were other Choose Your Own Adventure series that did the same thing. If Starwars didn't do it, then they should have.

  12. #1412
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Skalpadda's Avatar
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    I've been reading A Short History of Nearly Everything by Bill Bryson. I've never read anything of his before and was expecting the usual popular science writing, trying to astound me with amazing facts of nature that I already know or don't really care about. To some extent it is that, but he writes as much about the history and methodology of science as he does about scientific knowledge and he also lifts up plenty less flattering stories about science and scientists. It ends up being a short history of science as a discipline that's entertaining to read and gives nice context for everything it talks about.

    Also finished The Trouble with Physics by Lee Smolin the other day. Not a hugely entertaining read, but it confirmed my prejudices against string theorists, so that's something.

  13. #1413
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Jockie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Similar View Post
    Finished Jon Ronson's The Men Who Stare At Goats and I'm not sure what to think. It's a bit like the way it's written stops it from having much impact. It feels sort of too casual somehow. Still worth reading, though.
    That's Ronson's style, I actually felt MWSAG is one of his weakest books. Remaining casual and down to earth as a Jewish man visiting the leaders of the Ku Klux or Muslim extremists, or embarks on adventures with conspiracy theorists in Them works for him far better
    I write about them video games at these locations

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  14. #1414
    Lesser Hivemind Node eRa's Avatar
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    Cobra II - The inside story of the invasion and occupation of Iraq.

    An enjoyable read, I'm only into the planing stages for both sides so far. But the authors seem to know their subject well. I'd recommend it if you have any interest in this particular operation.

  15. #1415
    Lesser Hivemind Node internetonsetadd's Avatar
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    I can hardly believe that I'm still reading Stranger in a Strange Land, but I've had the book on my shelf since I was 14 so I was unwilling to start something else and potentially never finish it. Almost done. There's half of a pretty decent novel here. The rest is fairly tedious, basically just one-sided conversations that Heinlein is having with the reader by hijacking otherwise interesting characters and pitting them against other characters who conveniently become docile and stupid. There's only so much "What do you mean, Jubal?" I can take. I'm glad I didn't go with the uncut version.

  16. #1416
    Network Hub corbain's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sabrage View Post
    I finally went out and bought Infinite Jest, having checked it out from the library with intention to read and never even entertaining the notion of starting it. I'm only 60 pages or so in, so the intricacies of structure haven't made themselves apparent to me so much as the annoyance of having a 1000-page novel with 3 different bookmarks, a dictionary and a phone to decode it have.
    .
    How are you getting on with IJ? I read it a couple of years ago- i found it much easier to read on an e-reader which makes all the jumping back and forth less of an ordeal, and is also just lighter to hold. There are some great section-by-section recaps available online which I found invaluable.

  17. #1417
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Voon's Avatar
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    Kay, I looked around my local bookstore and found Norwegian Wood. Just NW when I was planning to buy Hard-boiled Wonderland but it'll do. I read a bit of the translator's notes and found out it's his first published book. Vintage Murakami, then.

    And I re-read Catch-22 right at the first chapter and it still made me WAT. Either I'm not reading it right or Yossarian's gay for the Chaplain. I enjoyed it anyways
    Art blog here.

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  18. #1418
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Kelron's Avatar
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    Catch 22 is probably my favourite book ever.

  19. #1419
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    Colonization Aftermath by Harry Turtledove. Just read How Few Remain by him and now just waiting for the price on Tom Clancy's new book to come down in price. (yes, I know he didn't write it all, even so I must finish keep reading!)

  20. #1420
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    Catch 22 is pretty confusing at first. Stick with it, it's not entirely linear.

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