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  1. #181
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    I'm currently reading The Picture of Dorian Gray. Don't know why I hadn't thought of it sooner, it's brilliant.

  2. #182
    Network Hub Cable's Avatar
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    @Ethyls
    yea it really is, i just finished it so i won't say anything spoilerish but yea it was amazing

  3. #183
    Obscure Node Plankton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ethyls View Post
    I'm currently reading The Picture of Dorian Gray. Don't know why I hadn't thought of it sooner, it's brilliant.
    Quote Originally Posted by Cable View Post
    @Ethyls
    yea it really is, i just finished it so i won't say anything spoilerish but yea it was amazing
    Im about to start reading it too ^^

  4. #184
    Lesser Hivemind Node westyfield's Avatar
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    I read the Picture of Dorian Grey whilst on holiday last year. Really really good - if you haven't read it, read it.

    I'm currently reading Redemption Ark by Alastair Reynolds. Great stuff.

  5. #185
    Network Hub Megagun's Avatar
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    Also reading Redemption Ark. Indeed, great stuff. :)

  6. #186
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Kelron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ColOfNature View Post
    Definitely try Gaiman - I haven't seen any of his film work except Beowulf, so I can't really say how it compares to his written work, but Neverwhere is a good entry point if you liked Strange, it has a comparable combination of whimsy and darkness. Good Omens has a similar tone, but with added Pratchett (always a good thing). Anansi Boys is less dark, and American Gods is less whimsical - it's a dense read but probably the best of the bunch.
    American Gods is my favourite of his full novels, but Stardust, The Sandman (his graphic novel series) and some of his short stories have more in common with Strange. Smoke & Mirrors is a nice collection of short stories, there's also Fragile Things which I can't remember much of and Angels & Visitations which I haven't read.

  7. #187
    Lesser Hivemind Node icupnimpn2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kelron View Post
    American Gods is my favourite of his full novels, but Stardust, The Sandman (his graphic novel series) and some of his short stories have more in common with Strange. Smoke & Mirrors is a nice collection of short stories, there's also Fragile Things which I can't remember much of and Angels & Visitations which I haven't read.
    I hated Stardust: The Movie, though. Felt it was smarmy and inauthentic. It's one of the reasons I haven't tried reading Gaiman. Am I throwing the baby out with the bathwater?

  8. #188
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Kelron's Avatar
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    I didn't much like the movie either, the book is better but I mainly suggested it because it of the Victorian-style fairytale theme. You definitely shouldn't let it put you off Gaiman, I suggest reading Neverwhere, Good Omens or American Gods first then try the others if you're still interested.

  9. #189
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    American Gods is superb. My sister just got the 10th Anniversary Edition at a signing, and some passages are supposedly more long-winded, which is awesome.

    I'm reading The Left Hand of Darkness by Ursula K. Leguin. She's done a remarkable job so far.

  10. #190
    Obscure Node Pace's Avatar
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    I thought American Gods was great taken two pages at a time. I mean, it was full of these almost stand-alone little sections which were often brilliant. Like mini short stories or just extended descriptions of situations or places. As a whole I never quite figured out what it was supposed to add up to, but Gaiman is obviously an incredibly talented writer.

  11. #191
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Xercies's Avatar
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    I really loved Stardust the movie and it pretty much got me into Geiman, though I wish Ricky Gervais would die in a fire in that movie.

  12. #192
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    Approriately enough to the username above I'm reading "Persian Fire" an account of the rise of Persia and some of its attempts to spread into Greece.

  13. #193
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Ian's Avatar
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    American Gods: Excellent.

    Stardust: Much better than the film. Unless the whole premise annoyed you then it's a not-unreasonable guess that much of the stuff you liked least in the film was added while adapting it.

    I'm on the home stretch of Black House. It took an age to get going but once it finally did it's a good read.
    A brave heart and a courteous tongue. They shall carry thee far through the jungle, manling.

  14. #194
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    Just finished A Dance with Dragons, the series has been pretty much ruined for me.

  15. #195
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Althea's Avatar
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    I finished Prince of Thorns (The Broken Empire #1) by Mark Lawrence this morning, so it's back to Jasper Fforde's The Eyre Affair (Thursday Next #1) and Elizabeth Moon's Engaging the Enemy (Vatta's War #3).

    I didn't enjoy Prince of Thorns all that much, if I'm honest.

  16. #196
    Finished reading Consider Phlebas (Iain M. Banks) - loved it. Of his books, already read Look to Windward, and I've got Player of Games on the shelf ready to read "soon".

    Currently reading Killing Rommel by Stephen Pressfield - really like his writing style, and this makes a change for him with it not being about ancient greece or people pushing trees over with shields. Also it feels like an accurate depiction of how a world war would be so chaotic and pretty mental. Half-way in so we'll see.

    Future projects - er too many at the moment but the shortlist -

    - Malazan books, I'm up to Bonehunters (read once already but will need a re-read) and have got Reapers Gale ready to go on the shelf
    - Player of Games
    - The Heroes (Joe Abercrombie- need to buy it first)
    - Warlord Chronicles (Bernard Cornwell) - re-read, already read the 1st so 2 more to go

    Thats the shortlist anyway - the full list keeps getting longer...

  17. #197
    Network Hub Chaz's Avatar
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    Just finished reading The Hyperion Omnibus: Hyperion by Dan Simmons. Don't think I'd read any of his stuff before, quite different from the usual space opera stuff. Makes a nice break from the more straight laced sci-fi by the likes of Peter Hamilton, Neal Asher and Ian Banks etc.

    Other recent good reads have been:

    The Quiet War, Gardens of the Sun (Paul McAuley) Very good sci-fi writer, I'd recomend any of his books.
    The Lies of Locke Lamora (Scott Lynch) Kind of sci-fi fantasy with magic and technology but with a renaissance style setting, but without really focusing on any of it. Very good I thought.
    Left Hand of God (Paul Hoffman) Sort of fantasy setting, but more alternate medieval. Again very good, looking forward to the sequel.

    As well as the Sci-fi stuff I also like a good dose of history. Quite into reading about the age of sail and Napoleonic era at the moment.
    Just finished reading "Cochrane the Dauntless: The Life and Adventures of Admiral Thomas Cochrane, 1775-1860" by David Cordingly. Thomas Cochrane is generally thought of as being the real life inspiration for characters like Hornblower and Jack Aubrey.

    If you only read one book about the age of tall ships, then read this one "Storm and Conquest: The Battle for the Indian Ocean, 1808-10" by Stephen Taylor, it is absolutely brilliant and I hope he writes something again sometime soon.

    Other good history books and writers I like would have to include:

    Max Hastings
    Antony Beevor
    Mark Urban (I highly recommend "Rifles" and "Fusiliers")
    The Battle: A New History of the Battle of Waterloo (Alessandro Barbero) Very good and accessable account of the battle at Waterloo. Some Napoleonic stuff can be a bit stodgy but this is pretty pacy.
    Empires of the Sea: The Final Battle for the Mediterranean, 1521-1580 (Roger Crowley) I also highly recommend this one. Not a heavy read but packed full of action and amazing facinating stuff about life, politics and warfare in the Mediterranean during that period. I knew being a galley slave sucked, but I didn't know how badly until I read this. Also the white slave trade. Hundreds of thousands of people from the coasts of Europe were captured and sold into slavery in the Middle East, and entire coastlines could be left desolate. Yet whilst we hear a lot about the African slave trade we rarely get to hear or read about this one.

    Anyway, currently awaiting from Amazon:

    The Endymion Omnibus (Dan Simmons) The next two parts to Hyperion.
    Red Seas Under Red Skies (Scott Lynch) sequel to Lies of Locke Lamora
    The Technician (Neal Asher) Can't think of any other writter that currently does action packed sci-fi better. Big bad ass guys with big guns vs even bigger aliens, great stuff.
    Seafaring Women: Adventures of Pirate Queens, Female Stowaways, and Sailors' Wives (David Cordingly) Yep, more maritime history.
    Last edited by Chaz; 07-08-2011 at 12:45 PM.

  18. #198
    Lesser Hivemind Node Nullkigan's Avatar
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    I need to buy an ebook reader as I'm running out of shelf space.

    Recently finished Dance with Dragons and Wise Man's Fear (King Killer Chronicles/Name of the Wind book 2). Minor spoilers follow, moreso for Dance.

    Interestingly, they were essentially opposites.

    Wise Man's Fear
    had an absolutely fantastic first half that had me laughing out loud in several places and was a pleasure to read. The second half was much duller as the author indulged in setting up hooks and throwing events straight at Kvothe rather than letting him simply work himself into and out of an entertaining corner. The Fae diversion was particularly odious. The very end of the book picked up again, but the third volume is going to be extremely cramped if even half of what was outlined in the first couple of chapters of book one is going to actually happen.

    Meanwhile, Dance was comparatively dull even though it was about the more interesting half of the cast. Davos is a terrible character. He's a former smuggler, knighted and turned King's Hand, yet he's about the only character in the entire series with an uncompromising sense of honour and duty and thus never does anything interesting at all. Jon and Dany spend their time making stupid teenager mistakes, whilst Tyrion sort of floats around discovering new plotlines. Things get much better 2/3rds of the way through when events start to come to a head again and the last few chapters were actually very good. Hopefully this is the end of the period Martin originally wanted to skip entirely and the next book will be back on form and stop using cliches quite so much.

    Next on my list is Anathema. I'm also keeping an eye out for the next Scott Lynch book as I liked both Lies and Skies. I should probably finish the third of Bakker's Prince of Nothing series, but I find I simply don't care for it. It really should be more of my sort of thing than it is.
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  19. #199
    Just finished The Windup Girl by Paolo Bacigalupi, and loved it. There were a few parts that were hard to get through due to their imagery, but the effect was intended and I'm glad I powered through. The ending caught me off guard in the best of ways, and I'm definitely hungry for more from Bacigalupi.

    For now though, I'm taking a recommendation from this forum and reading Perdido Street Station by Mieville. I've heard mixed reviews, but I liked The City and the City, so I'm looking forward to it.

  20. #200
    Just finished A Dance with Dragons. I expected more to be resolved in Dance with Dragons considering it's such a large book. There are so many plot-lines open and Martin seems to be adding a dozen more with each book. I hope he gets to tie up all the loose ends.

    I'm currently reading American Gods by Neil Gaiman. It's interesting reading it after having read Terry Pratchett's Small Gods as they are based on a similar concept. I think I will be reading more Gaiman when I finish it.

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