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  1. #561
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Zephro's Avatar
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    Not really fantasy but I've been reading Rivers of London and Moon Over Soho, by Ben Aaronovitch, recently. They're good fun, managed to get a reference to Wong Kei's and System Shock 2 on the same page. They're about a special branch of the met who deal with magic users in London. Not very deep, what fantasy novel is, but good fun and some funny moments. The author also clearly loves London so really makes it shine.

  2. #562
    Quote Originally Posted by mrchinchin25 View Post
    Now reading - Revelation Space (Alastair Reynolds). A hard sci-fi series I'm told, just 10% in at the mo, quite liking it so far.
    33% in, starting to get hooked. Loving the "our theories about the aliens are maybe not accurate" and "wierd stuff that scares you and may be lurking in your brain" vibes.
    Planetside2 / Firefall: Crustycuffs
    Mechwarrior Online / Blood Bowl: Mrchinchin25
    GuildWars2: Shiifty (Mesmer) Frank Tankborn (Warrior)
    Raptr: mrchinchin25 Steam: mrchinchin25 Origin: ​Crustycuffs

  3. #563
    Quote Originally Posted by Vexing Vision View Post
    Just let me chime in for the love of Abercrombie - while I thought that The Heroes was his weakest book so far, I still found it immensely enjoyable, and his next books are bought blindly.

    His next one is supposed to hit around Q4 this year, and I can't wait for it.
    I'm not sure I class Heroes as his weakest book (although to be fair, I don't dare say any of his books are his weakest - I don't want the bloody cross carved into me!)

    I'm a sucker for well written battles where you can visualise the scale and locations of the battle - and this sold it in spades, with maps and all sorts of goodies.
    Planetside2 / Firefall: Crustycuffs
    Mechwarrior Online / Blood Bowl: Mrchinchin25
    GuildWars2: Shiifty (Mesmer) Frank Tankborn (Warrior)
    Raptr: mrchinchin25 Steam: mrchinchin25 Origin: ​Crustycuffs

  4. #564
    Quote Originally Posted by Fiyenyaa View Post
    On my "to read" shelf;
    - Eisenhorn Trilogy (Dan Abnett)
    - Best Served Cold (Joe Abercrombie)
    - The Heroes (Joe Abercrombie)
    - The Travels of Ibn Battutah (Tim Mackintosh-Smith)
    - Revelation Space (Alastair Reynolds)
    - The Tent, The Bucket and Me (Emma Kennedy)

    What a shelf! Wish I could go back and read Eisenhorn again for the first time.
    Planetside2 / Firefall: Crustycuffs
    Mechwarrior Online / Blood Bowl: Mrchinchin25
    GuildWars2: Shiifty (Mesmer) Frank Tankborn (Warrior)
    Raptr: mrchinchin25 Steam: mrchinchin25 Origin: ​Crustycuffs

  5. #565
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    Would the Eisenhorn Trilogy be a good starter for those uninitiated to the Wh20k universe(yes, we are more than a myth)?

  6. #566
    Network Hub Rakysh's Avatar
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    I think Cain would be a better place to start, but Eisenhorn will probably do ok. Actually, 15 Hours is pretty good and fairly short and accessible, so I'd start there- it was my first 40k book, I think.

  7. #567
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Althea's Avatar
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    Cain or Gaunt's Ghosts will be best, but if you want to read about the SPAYSE MAHREENS then you want the Ultramarines trilogy.


  8. #568
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus squirrel's Avatar
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    I found some of you mates' recommendations very interesting. Unfortunately the only English book store in my area refuses to stock them, say they dont expect those to popular here. They offer to order them for me but prices are very expensive. They charge USD30 for a novel. I understand their cost and risk, it's just those price tags are not affordable for me.

    The only way I can order myself is probably through Amazon.com, but it's shipping costs are way too high. I wonder if the shipping cost is really that high or if Amazon.com profits directly for internationally shipping.

  9. #569
    Lesser Hivemind Node Feldspar's Avatar
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    Distribution costs are high, more so for small packages. Remember that as well as Amazon having to make a profit on your order (after all they are a business), the distribution companies also have to make their buck and the high prices of fuel are cutting into their profit margins.

    Remember that ordering from the US means that your parcel is travelling airfreight, so your shipping costs have to pay for:-

    Amazon packaging up your goods
    Someone driving your parcel to the airport
    Someone loading the plane
    The plane flight
    Someone off-loading the plane
    Sorting of the parcel through customs and in a regional distribution centre
    Delivering the parcel to you.

    And it may be more complex than that. I doubt Amazon.com profits directly from the international shipping, maybe indirectly with cheaper rates due to volume, I know the company I work for don't, we expend effort trying to make sure we are getting stuff to the customers as cheap as possible.

    Could you order them in electronic form, surely that would work out cheaper in the long run?

  10. #570
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    Or just freaking download them off warez sites.

  11. #571
    Lesser Hivemind Node Kaira-'s Avatar
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    Got "The Year of Our War" as a birthday gift, so started reading that. Seems interesting enough, though I find it (at least in the beginning) quite hard to follow what is happening.

  12. #572
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus squirrel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Feldspar View Post
    Distribution costs are high, more so for small packages. Remember that as well as Amazon having to make a profit on your order (after all they are a business), the distribution companies also have to make their buck and the high prices of fuel are cutting into their profit margins.

    Remember that ordering from the US means that your parcel is travelling airfreight, so your shipping costs have to pay for:-

    Amazon packaging up your goods
    Someone driving your parcel to the airport
    Someone loading the plane
    The plane flight
    Someone off-loading the plane
    Sorting of the parcel through customs and in a regional distribution centre
    Delivering the parcel to you.

    And it may be more complex than that. I doubt Amazon.com profits directly from the international shipping, maybe indirectly with cheaper rates due to volume, I know the company I work for don't, we expend effort trying to make sure we are getting stuff to the customers as cheap as possible.

    Could you order them in electronic form, surely that would work out cheaper in the long run?
    I used to order from Amazon.com before the English bookstore in my area started business. Actually if one planned carefully for ordering, shippment cost can be affordable, but prerequisite, you have to group as many items as possible. Having each order containing only a few items and shipping cost is prohibitively high.

    I want to order electronic versions too but I am so concerned about DRM. I can't tolerate "purchasing" sth. I cannot truly own, as for games, and as for books.

    Quote Originally Posted by Shane View Post
    Or just freaking download them off warez sites.
    Hey actually I know some places. But you know, the first rule of Fight Club is......

  13. #573
    Lesser Hivemind Node Feldspar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kaira- View Post
    Got "The Year of Our War" as a birthday gift, so started reading that. Seems interesting enough, though I find it (at least in the beginning) quite hard to follow what is happening.
    Yeah, it's not that easy to follow at first, many characters are either known by name or title interchangably but not both together; doesn't stop to explain concepts much (but this does keep the flow and doesn't assume the reader is slow and needs everything explaining); jumps into flashbacks often without warning; and starts in the middle of action (thus avoiding the slow labourious start, I mean how many times do you want to read about some guy growing up in a sleepy village).

    Persevere, though, the series is a nice set of interlinked stories with the narrator as the fulcrum but not always the focus.

  14. #574
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Unaco's Avatar
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    Mostly I've been rereading the preliminary synopsis for Joe Abercrombie's forthcoming book...

    “Shy South comes home to her farm to find a blackened shell, her brother and sister stolen, and knows she’ll have to go back to bad old ways if she’s ever to see them again. She sets off in pursuit with only her cowardly old step-father Lamb for company. But it turns out he’s hiding a bloody past of his own. None bloodier. Their journey will take them across the lawless plains, to a frontier town gripped by gold fever, through feuds, duels, and massacres, high into unmapped mountains to a reckoning with ancient enemies, and force them into alliance with Nicomo Cosca, infamous soldier of fortune, a man no one should ever have to trust…”
    First thing: Nicomo Cosca!

    Second thing: Who's the bloodiest man we know? (rhetorical question, it's quite obvious who it will be). Expected publication is Autumn in the UK. Can't wait!

    Aside from that, I have recently given up reading Feist's Riftwar Saga... I got through Magician, and a few chapters into Silverthorn, but it really typifies the reasons I shunned fantasy for much of my life*: It's twee, it's sanitised, it's cliched, it's generic. I might go back to it, when I have absolutely nothing else to read.

    Instead, I've picked up The Judging Eye (part 1 of Bakker's Aspect Emperor trilogy) and ordered White Luck Warrior. After them, I'll probably read books 12 & 13 of the Wheel of Time... Then I'm at something of a loss. Scott Lynch's Locke Lamora books seem appealing, but I know there are only 2 out of 7 planned books published, and I much prefer to consume entire series in one go.

    *I was given the Hobbit by an English teacher when I was ~12 years old. I despised it. 16 years after, I got into Fantasy through ASoIaF, and in the last year have read that, first 11 books of Wheel of Time, Joe Abercrombie's 5 books, all of Erikson and Esselmont's Malazan books, the Complete Tales of the Black Company and The Prince of Nothing Trilogy.
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    I just have an opinion different to your own. Circle jerking is good for no one, be glad somebody isn't afraid to disagree with women on the internet.
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    No, you are literally the cancer that is killing gaming.
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    Nobody's ever lost sleep over being called a cracker.

  15. #575
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Jockie's Avatar
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    Was wondering if anyone could help me in a couple of ways.

    Firstly, does anyone have any recommendations for good cyberpunk stories (be it short story collections or novels) past the obvious like Neuromancer?

    Secondly, the reason I'm asking is i'm researching for my final creative writing assignment at uni and I'd quite like to know if my idea is in any way original. Essentially it's about a near-future story about a man-made afterlife, where human consciousness can be replicated in electronic form and are able to inhabit articifial environments, exploring ideas like the monetisation of the afterlife, religious reactions and terrorism/hacking. Does this sound familiar to anyone? (i'm sure it's been done before but my search results have been inconclusive)
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  16. #576
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus mrpier's Avatar
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    Jockie - For your second point, there has been some authors that have written about this in their works, Peter F. Hamilton in the latest the Void series has a sort of government made up of post-existence humans, not really the focus of the series though.

    Iain m. Banks has touched up against this in several of the culture novels, most extensively (I think, haven't read all of his books yet) in Surface Detail.

    Tad Williams uses something similar in his Otherland books, although the focus is initially on it as a sort of videogame. This is also written in a near-future setting.

  17. #577
    Lesser Hivemind Node westyfield's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jockie View Post
    Essentially it's about a near-future story about a man-made afterlife, where human consciousness can be replicated in electronic form and are able to inhabit articifial environments, exploring ideas like the monetisation of the afterlife, religious reactions and terrorism/hacking. Does this sound familiar to anyone? (i'm sure it's been done before but my search results have been inconclusive)
    Altered Carbon by Richard Morgan is a little like that, except it's not artificial - a person's consciousness is stored on a chip that's implanted in their neck. When they die, they download into a new body (which could be a clone, or an entirely different one). Only the rich can afford it, so an elite class appears that can do pretty much anything it wants. It's quite good, a solid future-noir detective/action story (the protagonist is a mercenary solving a man's murder - but the man is still alive in a new body). Not entirely sure it's what you're looking for but I'd recommend it anyway.

  18. #578
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Jockie's Avatar
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    Thanks to both of you, very helpful.
    I write about them video games at these locations

    And on Twitter

  19. #579
    Lesser Hivemind Node Feldspar's Avatar
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    The Red Men by Matthew De Abaitua kind of covers this from a different angle, the titular red men are simulations of living people maintained digitally to enhance the productivity of their living counterparts and part of the book explores the differences of how a digital person isn't bound by the physical or moral laws of the real world, inhabiting a world of back-ups and resets.

  20. #580
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Kelron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Feldspar View Post
    The Red Men by Matthew De Abaitua kind of covers this from a different angle, the titular red men are simulations of living people maintained digitally to enhance the productivity of their living counterparts and part of the book explores the differences of how a digital person isn't bound by the physical or moral laws of the real world, inhabiting a world of back-ups and resets.
    I think I read that, it was entertaining but ultimately forgettable (at least, judging from the way I'd forgotten it until you mentioned it).

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