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  1. #941
    Lesser Hivemind Node westyfield's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Althea View Post
    Pretty sure that's a spammer.
    Oh damn, looks like you're right. Odd that it wasn't actually advertising anything.

  2. #942
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Althea's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by westyfield View Post
    Oh damn, looks like you're right. Odd that it wasn't actually advertising anything.
    There's loads of different types. Some hit a certain post number and then advertise, some try and integrate themselves, some can't because of forum software (think of a sperm with no tail - that's what they end up like) and so on.


  3. #943
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    Started 'The Heroes' after finishing the first law trilogy. Fuck but I hate Bayaz - in a good way.

  4. #944
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Unaco's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Serenegoose View Post
    Started 'The Heroes' after finishing the first law trilogy. Fuck but I hate Bayaz - in a good way.
    Indeed. Bayaz is brilliant. One of my favourite characters. Total c***, but brilliant to read.

    I'll update briefly (or not so briefly, as it turns out) with what I've been reading recently, but might elaborate on these later... Glen Cook deserves a lot of exposure especially.

    I read "A Fortress in Shadow" and "A Cruel Wind", the prequel and main sequence novels of Glen Cook's Dread Empire series. Very good indeed. Great characters, setting, world/lore etc. Eminently readable. Shows where Cook was coming from, turning fantasy on its head somewhat, and how he's been such an inspiration for a lot of modern 'dark' fantasy writers (Malazan, Abercrombie). Although on as epic a scale (almost) as the Black Company, not as epic in scope, and perhaps more endearing because of that. Smaller cast of characters as might be expected from Fantasy as well.

    I then read the first 2 Gentleman Bastard novels by Scott Lynch ("The Lies of Locke Lamora" & "Red Seas Under Red Skies"). I thoroughly enjoyed them, and raced through them (finished the 2 in a about 10 days). They are that sort of swashbuckling, rip-roaring adventure type of books, with a lot less of the philosophising and the like I've been used to in the fantasy I've been reading (Bakker, Malazan, Abercrombie), but great reads none the less. They're about a group of con-artists/elaborate thieves, in a Renaissance era Italy analogue, with a Venetian/Florentine/Warring states style of setting. The 2nd one even has Pirates!

    I have the first two complete Chronicles of Thomas Covenant, The Unbeliever (the first 6 books) sitting on my shelf currently, which arrived today, and are currently waiting for me to jump into. Unfortunately, due to the pace I got through the Gentleman Bastards' books, and the recent bank Holiday in the UK, they didn't arrive before I had finished "Red Seas Under Red Skies". And so, I was left on Sunday evening with nothing new to read (I could have gone back to Feist's Riftwar series, but I would have rather masturbated with a cheese grater... at least that would have been mildly amusing).

    I decided instead to start a re-read of the Malazan books, a series that I started about a year ago exactly, and of which I've read everything currently published (by Erikson and Esselmont). There's something about these books, and the world they create, that endears them to me so much... Yes, they're sprawling, sometimes confusing, sometimes contradictory, sometimes bewildering novels... Yes, they can leave plot threads (and entire garments) hanging, dangling in the wind at times. They're not "easy" books to read, and they can leave a reader (especially one new to the series) floundering at points. But the scope, the depth, the thought that's gone into the world, and the way it comes across (almost like osmosis, you absorb the world and the peoples and the characters with each new book) is, to me, quite staggering. The two architects of the world, Erikson and Esslemont (who created the world and a lot of the characters not for literature, but for tabletop RPGs back in the '80s), are (or were) both archaeologists, students of ancient cultures and peoples... and it really shows with the books. I think I got this line from a review, about how, with each new book, or chapter, or paragraph even, they strip away another strata or layer of the history of the world, to reveal something new. Every ruin, every barrow, every character introduces some new thread to the world, and altogether they produce this amazingly deep, rich, epic, fantastic world. Brilliant characters and personalities as well... the comaraderie, kinship provided by the Bridgeburners or the Bonehunters is great... the treatment of the ascendants and gods and Gods and all the others on the spectrum of power that seems to exist is wonderful aswell, bringing the greatest and the least together... and the dialogue is a joy at times, Kruppe is fantastic, as are Shadowthrone and Cotillion (who were originally Erikson and Esslemont's pnp RPG characters), and Tehol Beddict and Bug had me actually laughing out loud at times.

    I'm almost tempted to put off Thomas Covenant and just plough right on through with the Malazan books...
    Last edited by Unaco; 09-05-2012 at 07:13 PM.
    Quote Originally Posted by Hypernetic View Post
    I just have an opinion different to your own. Circle jerking is good for no one, be glad somebody isn't afraid to disagree with women on the internet.
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    No, you are literally the cancer that is killing gaming.
    Quote Originally Posted by Serenegoose View Post
    Nobody's ever lost sleep over being called a cracker.

  5. #945
    Activated Node CWalker's Avatar
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    Finally finished Storm of Swords part the first, and commenced part 2. Got to that chapter, and now I hate the series and everything to do with it :'(

  6. #946
    Quote Originally Posted by CWalker View Post
    Finally finished Storm of Swords part the first, and commenced part 2. Got to that chapter, and now I hate the series and everything to do with it :'(
    Oh god. That chapter.

  7. #947
    Activated Node CWalker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alex Bakke View Post
    Oh god. That chapter.
    Everything was going so well, and...and...DAMN YOU GEORGEEEE

  8. #948
    Lesser Hivemind Node westyfield's Avatar
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    Never forget.

  9. #949
    Network Hub corbain's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alex Bakke View Post
    Oh god. That chapter.

    Is that chapter the one often described as the R** W****** ?

    Personally, I loved that twist...

  10. #950
    Activated Node CWalker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by corbain View Post
    Is that chapter the one often described as the R** W****** ?

    Personally, I loved that twist...

    As far as twists go, it's spectacular. Completely caught me off guard, though that may just be because I'm an idiot :P

    Storm of Swords is very finished, and Feast for Crows has commenced. I expect great things, judging by the quality of SoS.

  11. #951
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Berzee's Avatar
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    I have been reading the first book in the Ranger's Apprentice series (because I skipped Young Adult books when I was a Young Adult, they are practically all I read at present). I'm about 60% finished and from the first page I have been experiencing the same strange sensation in practically every chapter. It goes like this:

    Ohnoooo so clicheeee--Whew! Averted!
    Ohnoooo characters acting indefensibly stupid and heading towards unnecessary pain--Oh...they actually learned from their previous mistakes!
    and so forth

    I am not sure if John Flanagan does this on purpose -- introducing tropes which I have long ago tired of, waiting for me to lose faith in him, and then tossing the disappointment aside by the simple expedient of giving most of the characters at least an average amount of common sense -- but it's been fun for me. =P

    It helps also that there is an appreciable number of Funny Things that occur.
    Support for my all-pepperjack-cheese food bank charity drive has been lukewarm at best.

  12. #952
    This week I have been reading The God Delusion by Richard Dawkins, and I have been enjoying it immensely.


    Quote Originally Posted by CWalker View Post
    As far as twists go, it's spectacular. Completely caught me off guard, though that may just be because I'm an idiot :P

    Storm of Swords is very finished, and Feast for Crows has commenced. I expect great things, judging by the quality of SoS.

    Hah, I wouldn't bet on FfC being good. It's terrible IMO.

    For me, the twist was great in that the sheer severity of what occurred was massive, but I saw it coming.

  13. #953
    Quote Originally Posted by CWalker View Post
    As far as twists go, it's spectacular. Completely caught me off guard, though that may just be because I'm an idiot :P

    Storm of Swords is very finished, and Feast for Crows has commenced. I expect great things, judging by the quality of SoS.
    I've been see-sawing between Gaunt's Ghosts and GoT but I've just picked up book 4 again.
    But yeah, THAT bit is amazing.
    Caught me off guard too.

    Best twist I've read since the end of Use of Weapons.

  14. #954
    Lesser Hivemind Node westyfield's Avatar
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    Slowly working my way through The Red House Mystery by A.A. Milne. Yes, that A.A. Milne.
    Its a very pleasant read. I bought it as a Christmas present for my mum last year, she enjoyed it and said I should read it, and now I've finally got round to doing so.
    I'm not far enough into it yet to have formed my own hypothesis, but from what I've heard and where it seems to be going, it should be possible to figure out whodunnit before the main character does.
    In the introduction, Milne writes: "For this is really what we come to: that the detective must have no more special knowledge than the average reader. The reader must be made to feel that, if he too had used the light of cool inductive reasoning and the logic of stern remorseless facts (as, Heaven bless us, we are quite capable of doing) then he too would have fixed the guilt. ... Death to the author who keeps his unravelling for the last chapter, making all the other chapters but prologue to a five-minute drama. This is no way to write a story."

    So far, so recommended. Will report back once I've finished it.

  15. #955
    Lesser Hivemind Node Drayk's Avatar
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    I finished "Le grand vaisseau" (Marrow) last week.

    I started "The pillars of the earth" but stopped at 150 pages or so... will probably continue another time.

    I am reading "A dance with Dragons" on my Kindle in English...

    I am not patient enough to wait for the French translation. Besides it would cost me 5 times as much for the same content.
    Last edited by Drayk; 16-05-2012 at 08:25 AM.

  16. #956
    Quote Originally Posted by westyfield View Post
    Milne writes: "For this is really what we come to: that the detective must have no more special knowledge than the average reader. The reader must be made to feel that, if he too had used the light of cool inductive reasoning and the logic of stern remorseless facts (as, Heaven bless us, we are quite capable of doing) then he too would have fixed the guilt. ... Death to the author who keeps his unravelling for the last chapter, making all the other chapters but prologue to a five-minute drama. This is no way to write a story."
    That quote from Milne makes it sound amazing. I'll try and track it down on the kindle.

  17. #957
    Lesser Hivemind Node Keep's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alex Bakke View Post
    This week I have been reading The God Delusion by Richard Dawkins, and I have been enjoying it immensely.
    I say this as an atheist, but urrrgh The God Delusion. This is my summary of that book:
    Part 1. Undergraduate arguments as to why God doesn't exist.
    Part 2. Religion is bad on a societal scale so let's hate it. Hate! Haaate.

    Quote Originally Posted by westyfield View Post
    I'm not far enough into it yet to have formed my own hypothesis, but from what I've heard and where it seems to be going, it should be possible to figure out whodunnit before the main character does.
    I'm really conflicted about those types of whodunnits. I mean, definitely better than "pull it out of my arse" resolutions or "I have key information but the reader won't know specifically what it is until the last chapter".

    But then again the thrill for me of a good whodunnit is "Of course! I shoulda seen it coming!" Not "Right. I saw that coming." And it's a tough spot to find for the author without pulling a few tricks along the way.
    Free speech don't mean unchallengeable speech.

  18. #958
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Althea's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Keep View Post
    Part 2. Religion is bad on a societal scale so let's hate it. Hate! Haaate.
    Yeah, 'cos it's totally stupid to hate a system that discriminates against The People Of The Day (or, if there's no-one around, the Jews) and breeds hatred.


  19. #959
    Quote Originally Posted by Keep View Post
    I say this as an atheist, but urrrgh The God Delusion. This is my summary of that book:
    Part 1. Undergraduate arguments as to why God doesn't exist.
    Part 2. Religion is bad on a societal scale so let's hate it. Hate! Haaate.
    I picked it up due to a couple of guys I know talking about how much of a dick he is. I hadn't actually read all that much by him before The God Delusion, so I thought I'd take a look - So far, (Four chapters in), he's coming across as a very reasonable man with very reasonable points. I don't understand what you mean by "Undergraduate arguments" - I'm not even an undergraduate, much less a man who knows about the current theological debates. Are his arguments just too simple? If so, I'm still a bit confused, because from my understanding the book is supposed to be an entry-level book looking at why there's no god.

  20. #960
    Lesser Hivemind Node westyfield's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Keep View Post
    I'm really conflicted about those types of whodunnits. I mean, definitely better than "pull it out of my arse" resolutions or "I have key information but the reader won't know specifically what it is until the last chapter".

    But then again the thrill for me of a good whodunnit is "Of course! I shoulda seen it coming!" Not "Right. I saw that coming." And it's a tough spot to find for the author without pulling a few tricks along the way.
    I don't mind detective stories, as long as I remember that it's a story about a detective. Often though I'll try to figure it out, and then in the final scene Captain Hastings will turn up and Poirot will say "Ah yes, Hastings was most diligent in gathering evidence back in London while I was investigating here at Smitherson Manor. Here's the evidence, including a signed confession from Lord Smitherson himself! And here's another piece of information that proves that Arthur 'Suspicious' Vagabond couldn't have murdered old Sir Massive-Inheritance!"

    Sometimes I want to read about a detective solving a case, and sometimes I want to solve it myself from the comfort of my sofa.

    Quote Originally Posted by Althea View Post
    Yeah, 'cos it's totally stupid to hate a system that discriminates against The People Of The Day (or, if there's no-one around, the Jews) and breeds hatred.
    Hello! Just thought I'd point out that we're not actually all the same. Much as with atheists, apatheists, agnostics, et cetera, there are nice religious people and nasty religious people. Take away the religion and you're left with nice people and nasty people.

    (Enough ranting now, I have a laboratory report to write and only seven hours in which to write it.)

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