Page 60 of 114 FirstFirst ... 1050585960616270110 ... LastLast
Results 1,181 to 1,200 of 2277
  1. #1181
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus coldvvvave's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Moscow, Russia
    Posts
    1,641
    I tried reading Cloud Atlas but... well, I just can't. It bored me.

  2. #1182
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    1,523
    Finished The Lies of Locke Lamora yesterday, so onto the sequel. After that I think I shall read the other Tiffany Aching books.

  3. #1183
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Ravelle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    1,603
    Quote Originally Posted by Serenegoose View Post
    Finished The Lies of Locke Lamora yesterday, so onto the sequel. After that I think I shall read the other Tiffany Aching books.
    Good to finally see someone reading those books! I loved both of them two bits, get ready for some crazy shit for the next book.

    It's really sad Scott Lynch suffered mental problems and had to postpone writing the books, I've been waiting forever for the third book now. Wiki says the third book is expected publication in autumn 2013 but I guess that can be taken with some salt.
    Steam | Origin: xRavelle | Skype: TheRavelle | PSN: Voltburn | Watch me struggle through my backlog

  4. #1184
    Network Hub Koobazaur's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    The Fridge
    Posts
    260
    Kafka on the Shore... more like, Kafka on the WHAT THE HELL IS GOING ON

  5. #1185
    Activated Node
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    46
    I am reading a book called "Ghastly Ghost Stories".

  6. #1186
    Network Hub
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    177
    Man's Search For Meaning.
    Good read. Finished it in one seating.

  7. #1187
    Lesser Hivemind Node fiddlesticks's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Zürich
    Posts
    751
    Quote Originally Posted by Koobazaur View Post
    Kafka on the Shore... more like, Kafka on the WHAT THE HELL IS GOING ON
    With a title like that it'd be more surprising if the book wasn't completely incrompehensible.

  8. #1188
    Network Hub Koobazaur's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    The Fridge
    Posts
    260
    haha, it's actually not so much incomprehensible, as just really random and off-the-wall. But in a good way, it's intriguing. And I do love me some Franz Kafka too :)

  9. #1189
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus sabrage's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    GMT-7
    Posts
    3,266
    Quote Originally Posted by Koobazaur View Post
    Kafka on the Shore... more like, Kafka on the WHAT THE HELL IS GOING ON
    Have you read Kangaroo Notebook?

  10. #1190
    Obscure Node
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    8
    I've been reading Mein Kampf.

  11. #1191
    Activated Node Steph's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Italy
    Posts
    48
    Quote Originally Posted by Koobazaur View Post
    haha, it's actually not so much incomprehensible, as just really random and off-the-wall. But in a good way, it's intriguing. And I do love me some Franz Kafka too :)
    Very intriguing indeed though I enjoyed 'Norwegian Wood' more.
    I'm reading Foucault's Pendulum and it embarrassess Dan Brown and it's code in every possible way.
    What a masterpiece.

  12. #1192
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus squirrel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    1,640
    Poorly Made In China by Mr. Paul Midler, a US business consultant stationing in Guangdong, Southeastern China, specializing in solutions for importers who are in trouble with Chinese manufacturing, quality issue is often the issue he is hired to sort out. Kinda freelancer he is.

    As the title suggested, this book concerns quality problem of Chinese manufactured products, and what cause them. He claimed from the beginning of the book that he wasn't intending to provide solution for the issue, since he wasn't prepared so yet, but it would be essential to address the nature of the problem first so that we can study it more thoroughly for solutions. I've read 6 chapters out of 22. He explained why importers all over the world choose to procure from China in spite of all the negative issues they have to face here, and it seems not likely for them to move their manufacturing base to other regions in the near future.

    This book is not that well organized in my opinion. In the each of the first 6 chapters, it is quite noticeable the focus is easily distracted. But I admire his observation, which so far is very consistent with mine who is adapted to the business culture here (but of course, do I have a choice otherwise?!)

    BTW, really interesting to learn that in the west, restaurant is kinda business emerged only after the French Revolution 1789. Is this true?
    Last edited by squirrel; 13-09-2012 at 03:10 PM.

  13. #1193
    Lesser Hivemind Node
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    868
    Quote Originally Posted by Unaco View Post
    Good luck with it... hope you get as much enjoyment from them as I did. Let me know how you get on. And if I can give you a few pieces of advice...

    Be ready to 'flounder' a little, at the start. It's a vast world the 2 authors have created, and it was never going to be easy to write a 'painless' introduction to it. Persevere and a lot will be revealed. Not all. But definitely a lot. It'll at least make a lot more sense, anyway. If you get the same (Bantam paperback) edition of Gardens of the Moon as I did, Erikson's foreword covers this.

    It's proven to be a good test for readers and the series... either people drop it halfway through Gardens, or something clicks with them at around that point, and then they stick with the series. When I first started, I was a little concerned... it wasn't clicking, I didn't know what to think, I thought it was trash almost. Then, into the 2nd half of the book, something clicked. And yeah... it's probably now my favourite series of books, next to Kandell, Schwarz & Jessell's "Principles of Neuroscience".
    I've finished the book, and am a bit underwhelmed. Well, I was expecting something like A Song of Ice and Fire with more wizardry and orcs, but these two do not have much in common. Erickson, unlike Martin who gives more attention to the characters than world-building, Erickson tries to keep it balanced. Gardens of the Moon follows a bunch of characters but also focuses on the world whose history spanning hundreds of thousands of years has an effect on the present events and the characters. The setting and lore kept me interested, but the storyline and characters, those I found to be fucking awful.

    The characters feel shallow and coarse, with bullshit motivations and make stupid choices. Lorn baits to Tyrant to Darujhistan and unleashes a Demon Lord despite knowing that either of these could flatten the very city that she had been sent to help conquer. I feel that the duality in personality that Erickson tries to portray amongst characters like Lorn, Rallick, Crokus et al was poorly depicted and left me doubting the sanity of these folks. Characters that have been alive/sentient for millennia do not differ much from mortals is their intelligence or motivation. Oponn makes two the characters its tools which accomplishes nothing other than putting itself in peril and having its tools used against it. All of the good guys making it out in one piece was another thing that pt me off. The one character I didn't outright hate was Anomander Rake but he too felt more like a victim of the uber-badass cliche.

    The book felt like something a D&D player would write; a deep history, a number of cultures, epic stuff happening, dragons, feminist streaks, magic, well defined rpg-ish classes, this is a setting that begs for a tabletop adaptation unless it hasn't been done already. Anyway, I don't think that this series is for me, I look for different things in a fantasy novel than what it chooses to focus on.

  14. #1194
    Obscure Node
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    5
    I read any type of romantic books preferred to read and these books fulfill over sexual requirements...any body like this?????
    NTEP scale
    Last edited by Lanko; 22-09-2012 at 02:23 PM.

  15. #1195
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus mrpier's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    1,280
    Quote Originally Posted by Shane View Post
    The book felt like something a D&D player would write; a deep history, a number of cultures, epic stuff happening, dragons, feminist streaks, magic, well defined rpg-ish classes, this is a setting that begs for a tabletop adaptation unless it hasn't been done already. Anyway, I don't think that this series is for me, I look for different things in a fantasy novel than what it chooses to focus on.
    Spot on, that's the origin of the world, it was a rpg world created by Erikson and Esslemont, and I think Gardens of the Moon originally started out as a script for a movie.

  16. #1196
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    1,876
    Just finished reading The Suicide Shop by Jean Teule. Picked it at random in a book store waiting for my train and it's surprisingly hilarious.

    About to get started on The Tibetan Book of Life and Death that my former boss gave to me last week. Going to be a loooong read.

  17. #1197
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    1,523
    I think my current reading plans are:

    Finish Red Seas Under Red Skies (amazing.)
    Grab one of the Tiffany Aching books to read and finish that in time for...
    Oct 4th, when The Hydrogen Sonata by Iain M M Banks is released, and then finish that in time for Oct 18th, when Red Country, by Joe Abercrombie is released. Good month for books, October is. Lots of Red in what I'm reading, too. Oh goodness, now it's doing that thing where I've typed the word out and it's lost meaning.

  18. #1198
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    1,523
    Quote Originally Posted by Ravelle View Post
    Good to finally see someone reading those books! I loved both of them two bits, get ready for some crazy shit for the next book.
    Your name makes a lot more sense now, Orrin.

  19. #1199
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Unaco's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    1,900
    Quote Originally Posted by mrpier View Post
    Spot on, that's the origin of the world, it was a rpg world created by Erikson and Esslemont, and I think Gardens of the Moon originally started out as a script for a movie.
    .

    It was intended to be a movie originally... ICE and Erikson tried to get it funded, out of Hollywood, for quite a while. At one point it was going to be a comedy movie based on the Phoenix Inn regulars (Kruppe, Rallick Nom, Murillo etc). It was never intended to be a book, until someone suggested they try that route. I think, from this and the rewriting, that it does suffer somewhat.

    I can understand people having issues with Gardens of the Moon. It's a good book, I think... but it isn't the best introduction to the Malazan series. It definitely has its problems. If you do have Deadhouse Gates though, I would give that a read before you give up... It changes the focus quite a lot, the Chain of Dogs is a brilliant bit of story telling, and it feels more like the first book of the Book of the Fallen. If not, I apologise for my hard sell on the series, if I misrepresented it or pushed it on you.

    Anyway... I'm currently reading the Anabasis by Xenophon. It's not fiction, but instead the true story of 10,000 Greek/Hellenic mercenaries, who went to Persia at the behest of the Persian King's brother to kick some arse. Unbeknownst to the majority, that arse was the one belonging to the Persian King. They fought a battle, won, but their employer was killed, their allies bought/scared off... and they were left in a foreign, hostile land, with no idea how to get home, surrounded by enemies, under almost constant attack, and the threat of annihilation (they were largely heavy infantry, while their enemy had lots of cavalry - the enemy could run away safely and never be caught/wiped out. They couldn't run, ever, or would be destroyed). It's actually one of the inspirations of the Chain of Dogs I mentioned earlier. It might be the translation I got, but it isn't the most emotionally told story... it's a little dry, not much description or 'character' to it. But it is a historical text, and very insightful. Xenophon was a contemporary of Socrates and Plato, and he could write very well in an analytical and informative way.

    I've also just finished reading Mark Lawrence's Broken Empire books 1 and 2 (Prince and King of Thorns). It's another of these that seeks to completely invert the traditions of Fantasy, I think. Instead of the story of the Fantasy hero, and his arc/development, it's the arc of a Fantasy 'villain', the big bad. It's also not the 'historical' sort of fantasy, but is set in a post-apocalypse, where the previous advanced civilisation has been all but wiped off the face of the earth, and society has reverted to a feudal state. It was utterly compelling, and I found it difficult to put down the two books... ripped through them in about a week. It's definitely not going to be for everyone... the main character is, largely, a bastard. An absolute bastard. Amoral, unflinching, driven. But also somewhat charming. I won't spoil anything, but he isn't completely irredeemable. Almost so, but not quite.

    After that, I started a re-read of Joe Abercrombies 5 books, starting with The Blade Itself, in preparation/anticipation of a Red Country. I'm very much looking forward to that... Nicomo Cosca and Logen Ninefingers!

    That's a shame to hear about Scott Lynch. I thoroughly enjoyed the first 2 Locke Lamora books, even if they weren't the grandest, epicest, mature books, and was looking forward to Republic of Thieves.
    Quote Originally Posted by Hypernetic View Post
    I just have an opinion different to your own. Circle jerking is good for no one, be glad somebody isn't afraid to disagree with women on the internet.
    Quote Originally Posted by Hypernetic View Post
    No, you are literally the cancer that is killing gaming.
    Quote Originally Posted by Serenegoose View Post
    Nobody's ever lost sleep over being called a cracker.

  20. #1200
    Network Hub Raaritsgozilla's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    317
    Halfway through "The October Horse" by Colleen Mccullough.

    Some may know it, but if you dont its a series of 7 set in the mid to late republic/early principate of Rome. I just finish the 7th book then seem to go back to the first again.

    But during my upcoming holiday I have Magician and Beevor's Second World War to read. Much excite

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •