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  1. #1441
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Sketch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by corbain View Post
    Don't worry, you haven't really been spoiled.
    Ok, cool thanks. This is what I wanted to know.
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  2. #1442
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    Finished Casual Vacancy by J.K. Rowling a while ago - not bad, pretty intense ending, overall it was a good read but nothing exceptional.
    Now I've started City & City by China Miéville and the setting seems pretty great, all this talk about what he sees but he can't see etc. is confusing. Looking forward to the explanation of this "world" :)
    GW2: Eknurr (Lvl 80 Engi), Elaina Mischievous (Lvl 80 Ranger), Neeaha (Lvl 80 Mesmer), Bald Carl (Lvl 80 Guardian)

  3. #1443
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Lambchops's Avatar
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    Made some more progress in rereading all of Discworld thanks to doing a bit of traveling. Now onto Soul Music, which means I've just finished Men at Arms, from which I'm going to have to quote this excellent passage:

    "The reason that the rich were so rich, Vimes reasoned, was because they managed to spend less money.

    Take boots, for example. He earned thirty-eight dollars a month plus allowances. A really good pair of leather boots cost fifty dollars. But an affordable pair of boots, which were sort of OK for a season or two and then leaked like hell when the cardboard gave out, cost about ten dollars. Those were the kind of boots Vimes always bought, and wore until the soles were so thin that he could tell where he was in Ankh-Morpork on a foggy night by the feel of the cobbles.

    But the thing was that good boots lasted for years and years. A man who could afford fifty dollars had a pair of boots that'd still be keeping his feet dry in ten years' time, while the poor man who could only afford cheap boots would have spent a hundred dollars on boots in the same time and would still have wet feet.

    This was the Captain Samuel Vimes 'Boots' theory of socioeconomic unfairness."

    Also on the site where I handily found that quote to copy and paste I stumbled on this computer game related quote from Pratchett which made me giggle;

    "Over the centuries, mankind has tried many ways of combating the forces of evil... prayer, fasting, good works and so on. Up until Doom, no one seemed to have thought about the double-barrel shotgun. Eat leaden death, demon... "

  4. #1444
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Sketch's Avatar
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    That boots one is one of my favourite from any Discworld book, and the Nights Watch story arc is one of the best too. Vimes is a seriously great character.
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  5. #1445
    Obscure Node ScrabbitRabbit's Avatar
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    I'm currently reading Song at Dawn: 1150 in Provence (The Troubadors) by Jean Gill and Reaper Man by Terry Pratchett.

    Song at Dawn has been a pleasant surprise, seeing as I bought it on a whim with no prior knowledge of the author. It's the first bit of historical fiction I've read, too. I'm thinking I need to buy some more stuff from this genre.

    Reaper Man is the second Discworld book I've read, the first being Mort. I absolutely adore Pratchett's sense of humour.

  6. #1446
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    Priceless: The Myth of Fair Value (and How to Take Advantage of It)

    Kind of an eye opener for me at least. I'll never look at money or shopping the same again...

  7. #1447
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doodier View Post
    Finished Casual Vacancy by J.K. Rowling a while ago - not bad, pretty intense ending, overall it was a good read but nothing exceptional.
    Now I've started City & City by China Miéville and the setting seems pretty great, all this talk about what he sees but he can't see etc. is confusing. Looking forward to the explanation of this "world" :)

    I really enjoyed The City and The City. Confusing and alienating in turns, an abstract idea that seems so alien as to be fantastical but ultimately conceptually plausible. Orwell on acid.

    Currently reading The Kraken and I think this may be my favourite yet, evoking a more up to date, punkier Neverwhere. The link between the London of the Kraken and the imagination at work in DC's Dial H for Hero series (highly recommend) is pretty apparent, wasn't quite so obvious from Looking for Jake or Perdido Street, which are distinctly more gothic.

  8. #1448
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Fumarole's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mctittles View Post
    Priceless: The Myth of Fair Value (and How to Take Advantage of It)

    Kind of an eye opener for me at least. I'll never look at money or shopping the same again...
    I've heard good things about it. Would you recommend it?
    The Medallion of the Imperial Psychopath, a Napoleon: Total War AAR
    For the Emperor!, a Total War: Shogun 2: Fall of the Samurai AAR

  9. #1449
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    i read disworld books 1-17 in order, but after watching first season of Game of Thrones i decided to read those books instead, currently on book 4. i will surely go back to the discworld books when im done with GoT

  10. #1450
    Lesser Hivemind Node Bobtree's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fumarole View Post
    I've heard good things about it. Would you recommend it?
    I absolutely would, even though it eventually gets rather dry and ends up describing a lot of case studies. Poundstone is an excellent writer, and I also liked Prisoner's Dilemma, his book about game theory and nuclear war.

    If you like Priceless, the best book I've read of this sort is The Invisible Gorilla, and if you love that, read Blindsight (science fiction, but relevant and incredibly sharp).

  11. #1451
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fumarole View Post
    I've heard good things about it. Would you recommend it?
    I would really recommend it; at least if you haven't done a lot of study on decision making psychology and number anchoring. Those are two main points the book drives home but goes over a lot of real world examples. It really gets you thinking about how you shop and what really is the "value" of money.

  12. #1452
    Kiss of the Spider Woman by Manuel Puig

  13. #1453
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    Cell by Stephen King.
    Also just finished Kingdom Come ​.

  14. #1454
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    A Storm of Swords by George R. R. Martin.

    The Shropshire Lad - collection of poems written by fine English gentleman A. E. Housman.

  15. #1455
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    I was thinking about the books I read as a kid and there's two that I can't remember the names of right now. I was hoping someone could help me out.

    The story is set in a post-apocalyptic world where all the adults are dead. The children live in communities of their own. A group of, perhaps three, children decide to move on from where they are to escape starvation. They have a horse. Throughout their travels they are pursued by a packs of blind dogs. In the biting cold they find shelter in another community living in the midst of all the snow. The have a stockpile of apples that they subsist on. The group lives there for a while until one of them realizes that the cold is slowly killing them, and that it's the apples that make them less sensitive to it. Also, the kids refer to someone dying as ''stopped dreaming".

    The second is set in perhaps the 60s or 70s, and is about a pair of siblings who go to live with their deadbeat uncle. I've forgotten much of the story, but in the ending the uncle is convicted of burning down his boss' store while he claims that the boss got him to do it in order to claim insurance money.

  16. #1456
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus squirrel's Avatar
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    What about we talk about what upcoming book we are looking forward to?

    Me first, "Gods of Guilt" by Michael Connelly, gonna be the fifth book of the Lincoln Lawyer series. Mickey Haller is gonna work on a case in which one prostitute he used to help was murdered. I am guessing this is the prostitute he represented in her drug case in the 1st book. If you recall from the 4th book, at the end Haller decided to run for the DA office. Of course that's rather odd for a small-time, yet extremely infamous lawyer (but his bad reputation doesn't bring him real money, what a shame) to stand a chance in a public election.

    To be published by the end of the year, what a long wait, but I'm sure it will be worth the wait. The main theme of the series, which the ultimate justice will always be delivered, no matter how corrupted and twisted the system is, fascinates me.

  17. #1457
    Lesser Hivemind Node Feldspar's Avatar
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    Recently finished Cloud Atlas which I found okay, but ultimately unsatisfying and George Orwell's 1984 which I enjoyed much more than I thought I would, it hadn't dated half as much as I thought it would have, and although it doesn't carry the punch and relevance it might have 50 years ago it is still a pretty striking novel.

  18. #1458
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    Currently working through a collection of HP Lovecraft short stories. Some are legitimately unsettling, though occasionally he settles into an idea that only sort of half-works (ex: Beyond The Wall of Sleep).

    Also, I personally couldn't get into 1984. I get why people love it, but I found that it was an interesting set of ideas shoehorned into a rather bland story. And when the main character started reading a textbook for 20 pages I wanted to throw the thing across the room.

  19. #1459
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    Just finished reading The 39 Steps and Greenmantle by John Buchan. Thoroughly enjoyed them.

  20. #1460
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    Just finished Kraken . VERY good. Very weird.

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