Page 99 of 112 FirstFirst ... 4989979899100101109 ... LastLast
Results 1,961 to 1,980 of 2233
  1. #1961
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Jesus_Phish's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Dublin, Ireland
    Posts
    4,155
    The first and second I both enjoyed. The third I bought, sat down in the bookshop to read it because I'd a few hours to kill and the bookshop is nice and quiet as opposed to Starbucks and after about an hour I thought about returning it before leaving the store.
    "Halo is designed to make the player think "I look like that, I am macho sitting in my undies with my xbox""

    Steam ID

  2. #1962
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus gundato's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    5,298
    Quote Originally Posted by Serenegoose View Post
    So, that's my whining. Anybody got anything I should read? I'm all about sci-fi and fantasy, but character driven, not world driven. Clashes of armies are dull. People being confronted with tests of their character, growing and failing and struggling, that's my jam.
    Well, Butcher's Dresden Files is pretty much perfect for the "tests of their character, growing and failing and struggling", but everyone and their mother knows about that series by now :p. A similar one that I just started reading over the past few months (the next installment is coming out in about a week) is the Hellequin Chronicles by Steve McHugh, although the protagonist is a bit TOO powerful and perfect for my tastes. Very fun universe and McHugh writes very good action sequences and can definitely pull off the horrifying aspects of urban (and medieval) fantasy, but I find I don't actually LIKE the protagonist. I like what he goes through and his narrative, I just don't like HIM, if that makes sense.

    Reading about yesterday's NSA "protest" on the internet (that was insanely half-assed) did remind me of The Expanse by James S.A. Corey, and that might be up your alley. It is sci-fi (set in the distant future, the main cast are people on a space ship, etc), but mostly focused on telling the story (the science is far more accurate than most books, but the authors don't mind running on Rule of Cool when needed).
    The world is pretty interesting, but it is very much character driven. One of the protagonists, Holden, is a great study on the argument between full disclosure and telling people only what they need to know, and Miller is very much a character who can be described as "a washed up cop being forced to confront his life and question if he ever accomplished anything or if said life had any meaning". Basically every installment has about five or six sequences where at least one of the protagonists is pushed to their limits and/or forced to contemplate what kind of a person they are.

    And while it does touch on some pretty dark themes at time, it never feels grimdark. One of the main characters is very much reminiscent of how Logan was handled in Red Country: He is clearly a dark and conflicted character who has a metric crapton of issues to work out, but he isn't given POV chapters so it is up to the reader to fill in the gaps on all of his inner turmoil, which works MUCH better if you ask me.

    One of the biggest themes in The Expanse is definitely about finding a way to balance idealism with the real world. What happens when a man who believes in freedom of information is confronted with knowledge that can tear the solar system apart? What happens when a cowboy cop is confronted with the consequences of his actions? What happens when a macho soldier finds something she can't fight? What happens when a woman of peace is trapped in the middle of a civil war? And lots more.
    Last edited by gundato; 12-02-2014 at 04:55 PM.
    Steam: Gundato
    PSN: Gundato
    If you want me on either service, I suggest PMing me here first to let me know who you are.

  3. #1963
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    1,440
    Quote Originally Posted by Jesus_Phish View Post
    The first and second I both enjoyed. The third I bought, sat down in the bookshop to read it because I'd a few hours to kill and the bookshop is nice and quiet as opposed to Starbucks and after about an hour I thought about returning it before leaving the store.


    Owch. That's no good. I don't think there's many books I've felt that negatively for before. Ah, I'm really not sure what I'm looking for at the moment. Well that's untrue. I'd love another Un Lun Dun, or Mistborn, or Surface Detail, or I Shall Wear Midnight. I'm just struggling to find it.

  4. #1964
    Lesser Hivemind Node
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    UK, Derby
    Posts
    987
    Read the Kindle sample of The Fell Sword and instantly snapped and bought it. Should keep me busy for a while.

    Also discovered that Burn, the final volume of Julianna Baggott's trilogy, is out oh God I can't keep up with books. At least now I can finally finish Fuse; I'd put that one down about 3/4 of the way through because to be honest I simply didn't want it to end. I did an article ages ago for the film website I used to write for, the gist of which was "Why the hell is anyone adapting The Hunger Games when X, Y and Z exist" - I still stand by that. The sheer wealth of YA novels which are just really, really good books by any standards, only tweaked for a teenage audience, means there's no excuse for paying any more attention than necessary to Suzanne Collins' drivel. (Not even if your excuse is "cha-ching!".)

    EDIT: Pure, Baggott's first book, did get optioned, but like Patrick Ness's Chaos Walking books there's no way any film adaptation is going to do it justice. People really don't seem to want to acknowledge the stuff YA authors are allowed to get away with - it's the whole "Silly rabbit, cartoons are for kids" argument writ large.
    Last edited by Eight Rooks; 12-02-2014 at 04:57 PM.

  5. #1965
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    1,440
    Thanks for the recommendations, Gundato. I've got the first Dresden Files book (as a gift) but I've not read it yet. The others I'll see if I can find tomorrow at the bookshop, give them a chance to grab me.

  6. #1966
    Lesser Hivemind Node
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    UK, Derby
    Posts
    987
    Also, just as an observation, I tried the sample of the first book of Daughter of Smoke & Bone: granted, it was a while ago, but I remember I recoiled when she stuck "I couldn't stop thinking about <hero name>, ohmyGod, he was just so dreamy, let me tell you exactly how dreamy he was" inside the first five or ten pages. No. If you think so little of your audience you've got to start telling them "No, seriously, keep reading, there are hot guys and everything" that fast (and arguably if you believe you've got to do it that blatantly at all) there's a good chance you're not worth my time. I got irritated by that sort of thing when I was an idiot horny teenager, and it seems even sillier now.

  7. #1967
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    1,440
    Quote Originally Posted by Eight Rooks View Post
    Read the Kindle sample of The Fell Sword and instantly snapped and bought it. Should keep me busy for a while.

    Also discovered that Burn, the final volume of Julianna Baggott's trilogy, is out oh God I can't keep up with books. At least now I can finally finish Fuse; I'd put that one down about 3/4 of the way through because to be honest I simply didn't want it to end. I did an article ages ago for the film website I used to write for, the gist of which was "Why the hell is anyone adapting The Hunger Games when X, Y and Z exist" - I still stand by that. The sheer wealth of YA novels which are just really, really good books by any standards, only tweaked for a teenage audience, means there's no excuse for paying any more attention than necessary to Suzanne Collins' drivel. (Not even if your excuse is "cha-ching!".)
    Why is anybody adapting the Hunger Games when Chaos Walking exists. Those books should be required reading on the 'this will mess you up' front. The Tiffany Aching books should be on there too. Just as instrumental guides on people and how they work. Super insightful.

    PS! I'm an author. Have 3 chapters from my first novel. (Which is finished.) I feel like doing a little bit of shameless self-plugging, because I'm feeling uncharacteristically bold today. And I'm proud of it.

    http://ourfaeriesarediffering.tumblr...nder-chapter-1

  8. #1968
    Lesser Hivemind Node
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    UK, Derby
    Posts
    987
    Quote Originally Posted by Serenegoose View Post
    Why is anybody adapting the Hunger Games when Chaos Walking exists. Those books should be required reading on the 'this will mess you up' front. The Tiffany Aching books should be on there too. Just as instrumental guides on people and how they work. Super insightful.

    PS! I'm an author. Have 3 chapters from my first novel. (Which is finished.) I feel like doing a little bit of shameless self-plugging, because I'm feeling uncharacteristically bold today. And I'm proud of it.

    http://ourfaeriesarediffering.tumblr...nder-chapter-1
    See my edit. There's no way even half the violence, swearing, large-scale battle scenes, terrorism, slavery and general nastiness will make it in unexpurgated, and I do think there's a valid argument to be had that they need to be. The whole "What's The Hunger Games? Oh, it's like Battle Royale for tweens" thing was dumb, but it was nowhere near as far off the mark as some people insisted. A lot of YA novels are dark, dark, dark and the kind of thing that, put on screen in as much detail as exists on the page, would net an instant 15 or equivalent, probably higher. And in more than a few of them - Ness's writing, certainly - the violence isn't gratuitous, it's part of the message the book is trying to put across.

  9. #1969
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    1,440
    It's not a perfect book series, and it does have the odd issue, but given how the first two books turned out, I'd say there's mitigating circumstances. Without wanting to be spoilery, it gets into high fantasy territory fast but the main character is very much a product of our world and time. So it helps show just how out of step she is with the setting and circumstances.

  10. #1970
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    1,440
    Quote Originally Posted by Eight Rooks View Post
    See my edit. There's no way even half the violence, swearing, large-scale battle scenes, terrorism, slavery and general nastiness will make it in unexpurgated, and I do think there's a valid argument to be had that they need to be. The whole "What's The Hunger Games? Oh, it's like Battle Royale for tweens" thing was dumb, but it was nowhere near as far off the mark as some people insisted. A lot of YA novels are dark, dark, dark and the kind of thing that, put on screen in as much detail as exists on the page, would net an instant 15 or equivalent, probably higher. And in more than a few of them - Ness's writing, certainly - the violence isn't gratuitous, it's part of the message the book is trying to put across.
    Oh, agreed, but I was more making the abstract argument, rather than the practical one. I think they do need to be in there, uncensored, and I think that culling all that stuff for the sake of getting a 12 rating is really letting down everyone. So practically speaking, I hope nobody ever touches chaos walking. In theory, however, I think it deserves it. If that makes sense.

  11. #1971
    Lesser Hivemind Node
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    UK, Derby
    Posts
    987
    Quote Originally Posted by Serenegoose View Post
    It's not a perfect book series, and it does have the odd issue, but given how the first two books turned out, I'd say there's mitigating circumstances. Without wanting to be spoilery, it gets into high fantasy territory fast but the main character is very much a product of our world and time. So it helps show just how out of step she is with the setting and circumstances.
    Yeah, I'm prepared to be proven wrong inasmuch as I can believe there might well be stuff worth reading past that. I've just read plenty of books where there wasn't really, and it drives me up the wall when it gets in the way of the narrative - stuff like Emily McKay's dreadful The Farm was a half-decent idea utterly floored by all the tangents into "OMG why is he looking at me he's such a bad boy he's so dreamy I'd never imagined such a hot bad boy could ever like me" etc., etc. I'm aware it's something of a necessary evil, and obviously I don't think it's wrong to have awkward teenagers falling for each other in any novel, never mind novels aimed at awkward teenagers. Just I end up comparing those books where it's done poorly to something like the romances in Philip Reeve's books - still very much pitched at the same audience but simple, graceful, wonderfully observed, utterly heartbreaking - and my brain hurts.

    EDIT: You do know Chaos Walking has been optioned by Lionsgate, right? Just checking.

  12. #1972
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    1,440
    I know. But I'm trying not to think about it too hard.

  13. #1973
    Network Hub Stense's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    London
    Posts
    206
    Quote Originally Posted by Serenegoose View Post
    PS! I'm an author. Have 3 chapters from my first novel. (Which is finished.) I feel like doing a little bit of shameless self-plugging, because I'm feeling uncharacteristically bold today. And I'm proud of it.

    http://ourfaeriesarediffering.tumblr...nder-chapter-1
    Ooh, cool. I'll get reading it when I have some free time. Thank you.
    I have a new book out. Fancy some cynical fantasy comedy? Check it out:
    http://amzn.to/1oVrKlx

    Read my other stories: http://tessstenson.blogspot.co.uk/

  14. #1974
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    1,440
    Went into town to try and find a few of the books I was recommended, but being a luddite and not having a phone with internet access, I couldn't remember the names or authors. Oops. So I'll be writing those down before turning off the computer tomorrow.

    Still, a good 150 pages into The Revolution Trade now, and that's moving along at a fair clip. Saw a book called The Copper Promise as well, and read a few pages of it. Seemed a bit high fantasy by way of Joe Abercrombie (opens up with a torturer being about their business) and though I don't normally go in for that kind of thing, I don't have nearly enough female authors or female protagonists in my bookshelf. It's both, and it didn't immediately turn me off, so we'll see.

    Made me all reminiscent about Sand Dan Glokta, though. Good character.

  15. #1975
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    1,440
    Alright, Revolution Trade is finished. Not how I expected it. Good, if not his best. Definitely got better as it went.

    Now I guess I'm onto Raising Steam. Copper Promise after that, if I can't find any female led fiction I'd rather read before that.

  16. #1976
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus gundato's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    5,298
    In my continuing stalling while waiting for the books I have been looking forward to for a while (yay, tomorrow is the next Hellequin book) I finally gave the Nightside series a shot. I read a short story in an anthology I grabbed for a Dresden Files story (I think it was the one where an extremist priest stole Michael's sword, which is probably one of the most heartwarmingly awesome Dresden stories ever. That thing triggers Jurassic Bark levels of feels) and it seemed like a pretty cool universe. Essentially a mirror of London that is all about supernatural things cranking the depravity and horror up to eleven.

    After reading the first 2.6666 books (will finish the third tonight. They are short), I think I'll continue on with this. Not huge on John Taylor (the protagonist) in terms of his powers (he is a walking deus ex machina), but I definitely like the character. It is fun to read about someone who, to everyone else, is a mary sue but who is clearly just bluffing his way through life and getting very lucky. Similar to Dresden in that regards, but he really doesn't seem to have much offensive capability and probably can't defend himself against more than one foe at a time. So you get a nice climactic scene where he saves the world per book, but mostly it is just trying to weasel his way through and bluff random thugs. But mostly I am reading it for the supporting cast which includes a woman who walks around blasting things with a shotgun, a demigod with a straight razor, and a walking corpse held together with duct tape and staples.

    in terms of writing, it is pretty weak. The story is good, but the author doesn't really know how to tell it. he glosses over the bits that can have a good bit of emotional punch and it gives me the sense that he knows those are important but doesn't know how to tell them. Still, the plot and story itself is pretty fun.

    Not great books, and they will probably remain my "I need a stopgap and I don't feel like reading a ginormous novel", but I also see myself reading through the whole series, eventually.
    Steam: Gundato
    PSN: Gundato
    If you want me on either service, I suggest PMing me here first to let me know who you are.

  17. #1977
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Fumarole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    California
    Posts
    2,529

    I bought this a long time ago but bounced off of it a few pages in. Recently I found it on a bookshelf the missus cleaned and am now really into it. So apparently not only do I have a gaming backlog, but a book backlog too. Great.
    The Medallion of the Imperial Psychopath, a Napoleon: Total War AAR
    For the Emperor!, a Total War: Shogun 2: Fall of the Samurai AAR

  18. #1978
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    1,440
    So, I sort of started Raising Steam whilst I was at the hairdressers today, and I'm enjoying it. The story's really yet to kick off, but there's been plenty of Vetinari, and it's better written than Snuff, in my opinion. It's a bit all over the place to start with, but I get the feeling that's intentional, lots of short scenes establishing the various perspectives. He certainly can still use his impeccable turn of phrase to establish a sense of the wonder trains must have evoked (and I recall evoking, as a child) at the time. But then I accidentally misplaced it (not properly, just left it with someone else as they went off to do shopping) so I picked up Ancillary Justice by Ann Leckie because really I felt more like reading some sci-fi anyway. That's an interesting one. It's about a massive troop carrier battleship AI who definitely seems to have once worked for the bad guys, now reduced to a single human body with an agenda she's not keen on explaining to the reader just yet. I enjoy that she genders everyone as female, even as her narration elaborates that she's aware that she's probably talking to a male, but isn't good enough at speaking to quite remember all the proper forms and as an AI from a largely gender-unbothered society, doesn't really care anyway. We'll see how the story goes as it materialises, but promising start.

  19. #1979
    Network Hub
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    344
    I got an e-reader, and thus have been delving into the public domain stuff that I don't have to pay for. So far I've read Wuthering Heights (which was brilliant) and Picture of Dorian Grey (which was also brilliant), but I've stalled out on Heart of Darkness, which I find to be a complete slog. I feel like there's something about the story that I'm just not getting, seeing as how it's a classic and all, but it really does not appeal to me in the least. Thankfully it's incredibly short, so it should be fairly easy to just force my way through the thing, but it's taking me far longer then I thought it would.

  20. #1980
    Obscure Node
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Milan, Italy
    Posts
    4
    I've just finished the combo "The Shining"/"Doctor Sleep". The first is hands-down the best horror/thriller book ever written, the second a worthy sequel. Recommended to everybody.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •