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  1. #1

    Windows 7 native Blu-ray burning?

    Probably a dumb question but weirdly I can't find a definitive answer after a quick Google - does Windows 7 support native Blu-ray burning? I used to use Nero for burning DVD's and CD's prior to having Windows 7 but now I just use Win7 native burning. Most of the recorders I've looked at all come without software (like Nero).

    For backing up my PC data I use external drives but I also used to burn several DVD's every year for permanent backups. Now my data is too large for DVD's so I need to upgrade my optical drive.

  2. #2
    Lesser Hivemind Node frightlever's Avatar
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    Discs aren't super reliable and external hard drives are pretty cheap these days. I'd go for a couple of external drives and keep one at your parent's house or somewhere else off-site. Or Dropbox your important files.

    Sorry, can't answer your specific question.

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    Win 7 has no native support for burning Blu rays. I've used CDBurner XP in the past, which is free, seems to do the job pretty well.


    Or Dropbox your important files.
    If you're saving important documents on Dropbox, I'd urge you to encrypt your cloud sync folder, and continue to back it up seperately. Do not rely upon cloud storage to keep your documents safe or secure. It is collaborating/sharing software, not a professional backup solution.

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    Secondary Hivemind Nexus gundato's Avatar
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    Still not actually what you are asking, but if you take fright's suggestion of a cloud backup (which I support as generally a single fire can wipe out both your computers AND your back-ups, the way most people do it...), be aware of how secure the service is. Last time I checked, Dropbox doesn't actually encrypt your files and for a while had a big issue with people being able to grab anything they had the MD5 hash for (I think it also doesn't encrypt so it can scan for piracy and shit). Spideroak is a much better solution as they locally encrypt before storing it online. Of course, SPideroak also raises the question of how you are able to decrypt the files on a separate computer, but don't think too hard :p

    Either way, use something like Truecrypt for your really sensitive documents. Hell, you should do that in general on the off chance someone steals your back-up DVDs/blurays/hard drive.

    My personal approach is that I use Spideroak for all documents I want backed up/mirrored, but I use an extra layer of encryption for anything sensitive (keepass database for all my passwords, and various truecrypt thingies for sensitive documents).
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    Of course, SPideroak also raises the question of how you are able to decrypt the files on a separate computer, but don't think too hard
    Well, because it uses your password as the encryption key?



    Of course, considering it is US based and closed source, their claim of secure encryption counts for nothing, so good shout on Truecrypt.

  6. #6
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus gundato's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Davkaus View Post
    Well, because it uses your password as the encryption key?



    Of course, considering it is US based and closed source, their claim of secure encryption counts for nothing, so good shout on Truecrypt.
    Except that one of my friends forgot his password, had it changed, and was still able to access his files. So... yeah :p

    Also, there is nothing to really be worried about as whatever authorities are involved will still have to get a warrant for the equivalent of wiretapping. What you are thinking of is that email service (Lavabit?) that kept selling things as "The government wants to get ALL OF YOUR E-MAILS!!"... Because they were dumbfucks and were covering their asses by playing on how incredibly moronic most people are about security (and the internet's tendency to jump at an excuse to fight against any government).

    1. They used the same private key for basically everyone's mail
    2. They dicked around with the government to the point that the US Government no longer trusted them to get the data out of the databases for them
    3. They had to give the US government the private key AND their databases

    So using Spideroak (or possibly Dropbox, but I don't know about them enough) is no more insecure than using a phone (in fact, much more secure probably...) as the equivalent of a warrant (or the "We'll get a warrant some day, but fuck it for now" that the NSA is in trouble for :p) is required for each individual.

    Like I said, still encrypt the sensitive stuff seperately, but Spideroak is a pretty reputable company that prides itself on taking an intelligent approach to security and encryption, rather than just saying "We encrypt shit" and following REALLY bad practices

    Essentially, think of it as this: Lavabit ran a hotel where they knowing allowed drug deals and prostitution (probably not that, but they knew that a lot of people used it for shady purposes) occur. They also used the same key for every single door in the hotel. When the police came, they got a key to the room (admittedly, after threatening to arrest everyone on the staff and having to surround the entire building...), went to the door, unlocked it, and entered to arrest folks (actually collect evidence).

    Now, if this were a hotel and the police barged in on you jerking off in the shower, you have every right to be a bit annoyed. How dare the police kick down room 106 instead of 109. But once the initial shock wears off, you should probably be a lot more angry at the hotel management for letting that happen because of something as shitty as using one key for every room.
    Last edited by gundato; 02-01-2014 at 10:25 PM.
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    Lesser Hivemind Node frightlever's Avatar
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    I thought there were a number of SSL certificates in the Lavabit case, IIRC, but you'd never expect to have one per client. He had thousands of clients. When they demanded he hand over the keys he obligingly printed them out for them on hundreds of sheets of paper but the feds then threatened him with a $10k per day fine until he handed them over for reals (oh and by the way we're on holiday for the next couple of days so the earliest you can hand them over is then).

    Leo Laporte interviewed him on Triangulation.

    http://twit.tv/show/triangulation/125

    If you want to be completely paranoid you can set up Owncloud on a Synology NAS and put that somewhere off-site. Hell, stash a couple of them. One at home, one at work and one at the underground bunker you've been preparing for the past fifteen years.

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    It's funny how quickly threads wander off-topic, isn't it?

    I don't think Windows 7 has any native Bluray burning facilities but there are a number of apps to do the job. I don't use Bluray but my favoured free burning app, CDBurnerXP (it could do with a rename nowadays), claims to handle Bluray.

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    I don't think people worry about the government/police getting their data, but crooks using the same systems to get the data. No one worries about a lock smith breaking in. But people do worry about criminals picking the locks (they especially do for expensive cars) to get off with your stuff.

    Cloud storage seems only as reliable as the next account hack. Though it's got a very good track record in comparison to Adobe accounts or PSN+. That being said, I'd put the risk at about the same as a house burning down, that is very low. The only thing that puts me off online backup is speed and bandwidth costs. It makes it easier and cheaper to buy a new HDD every month for some. :P

    Discs can be the same. For the time it takes and the cost of the media, it might be cheaper for little HDDs or usb sticks.

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    Lesser Hivemind Node DigitalSignalX's Avatar
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    VSO video converter might be what you want if you ever are looking to burn multimedia blue-rays. It will also convert existing DVD ISO files of any type (data, video etc) to blue ray if you end up migrating.
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  11. #11
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus gundato's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TechnicalBen View Post
    I don't think people worry about the government/police getting their data, but crooks using the same systems to get the data. No one worries about a lock smith breaking in. But people do worry about criminals picking the locks (they especially do for expensive cars) to get off with your stuff.

    Cloud storage seems only as reliable as the next account hack. Though it's got a very good track record in comparison to Adobe accounts or PSN+. That being said, I'd put the risk at about the same as a house burning down, that is very low. The only thing that puts me off online backup is speed and bandwidth costs. It makes it easier and cheaper to buy a new HDD every month for some. :P

    Discs can be the same. For the time it takes and the cost of the media, it might be cheaper for little HDDs or usb sticks.
    That is why I suggest reading up on the services you use and having a second layer of encryption for really sensitive documents. If hackers do nail Spideroak and crack my specific key pair (or get the key Spideroak probably has in a database :p), I will be pissed and keep an eye on all my accounts and identity shit and what not, but I am not going to freak out. Because all my passwords and my scanned copies of legal paperwork and the like are further encrypted in a keepass and truecrypt respectively, and both of those are fairly secure (it takes so much effort to get in that I will be low on the priority list of any hacker).


    Quote Originally Posted by frightlever View Post
    I thought there were a number of SSL certificates in the Lavabit case, IIRC, but you'd never expect to have one per client. He had thousands of clients. When they demanded he hand over the keys he obligingly printed them out for them on hundreds of sheets of paper but the feds then threatened him with a $10k per day fine until he handed them over for reals (oh and by the way we're on holiday for the next couple of days so the earliest you can hand them over is then).

    Leo Laporte interviewed him on Triangulation.

    http://twit.tv/show/triangulation/125

    If you want to be completely paranoid you can set up Owncloud on a Synology NAS and put that somewhere off-site. Hell, stash a couple of them. One at home, one at work and one at the underground bunker you've been preparing for the past fifteen years.
    Yeah... printing it on hundreds of sheets of paper definitely counts as "dicking around"

    And I would definitely expect them to have a unique pair for every client. It is "free" to generate (cost in electricity and computer time both being pretty small) and they apparently had premium services too, so yeah...

    Both parties (US government and Lavabit) fucked with each other, but Lavabit and the like are trying to play themselves up as "super awesome hacktivists who are totally all about our freedoms" even though they had a shitty service with major flaws in it. Especially as they had cooperated with authorities in the past.
    Nah, this entire thing reeked as a way for them to bail on the broken service before people looked too closely while setting themselves up as internet heroes.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lavabit..._and_gag_order is probably as close to unbiased as we are going to get (and that is wikipedia, so the userbase definitely skews in the favor of "fuck the government, freedoms!"). And even that portrays Lavabit as having intentionally mislead the internet to make it seem like the US Government was trying to get ALL THE DATAS!!! instead of what they actually DID have a warrant for (I guess the NSA has to get one every few years :p).

    Again, if Lavabit had done exactly what they did the two dozen over times subpoenas were issued for user data there would have been no problems. They instead decided to side with the criminal (assuming this was Snowden: Regardless of how you feel about what he did, the guy DID break laws. And arguing "it is for the greater good" is the exact same argument the US Government uses when they "bend" the law, so... I suggest not using that argument :P), fuck with the authorities, and suffered for it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by AMacdoanld View Post
    It's funny how quickly threads wander off-topic, isn't it?

    I don't think Windows 7 has any native Bluray burning facilities but there are a number of apps to do the job. I don't use Bluray but my favoured free burning app, CDBurnerXP (it could do with a rename nowadays), claims to handle Bluray.
    We veered offtopic incredibly quickly, but in our defence, CDBurnerXP was recommended in the third post!

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    gundato, think for a moment. Lavabit offered a service. Encrypted communications. They were a company. The gov/NSA asked for all the keys to that encryption. How does that effect the business?

    This is not a locker with shopping/storage in it, and the police ask for a key to check for drugs. This is equivalent a company selling video equipment, and the government asking for a live feed to every camera. Privacy for a drug dog to sniff at a box, is a lot less embarrassing, than the police walking in to your bath room to "search" you.

    Thus, Lavabit, being communications, not storage, could not continue as a business offering secure communications and giving the keys to the NSA/Gov. As soon as they were asked for keys, their business model was extinct. They knew this, and prolonged the fall as long as they could. It might have been a stupid move, and they were annoying over it (printing keys on paper), but hey, go out with a bang. :)

    See if your business/place of work could continue if you had someone looking over your shoulder 24/7 to pull out customers. It would not take long before your customers realize they've got 24/7 surveillance on them, and they'd think twice about buying off your company.

    Might have gone differently if they had asked for a number of keys, and not all keys?
    From your own link:
    Wired speculated that Levison was fighting a warrant or national security letter seeking customer information under extraordinary circumstances, as Lavabit had complied with at least one routine search warrant in the past.[11][15] Levison stated in an interview that he has responded to "at least two dozen subpoenas" over the lifetime of the service.[16] He hinted that the objectionable request was for "information about all the users" of Lavabit.[17]
    It then mentions they wanted whatever form of master key the site had too. Basically, they seemed to want it all.
    Last edited by TechnicalBen; 04-01-2014 at 01:11 PM.

  14. #14
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus gundato's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TechnicalBen View Post
    gundato, think for a moment. Lavabit offered a service. Encrypted communications. They were a company. The gov/NSA asked for all the keys to that encryption. How does that effect the business?
    The exact same way the previous two dozen or so requests for data by law enforcement (that Lavabit complied with...) did? Or is the NSA actually asking (rather than taking, as is their style) fundamentally different than the FBI asking?

    This is not a locker with shopping/storage in it, and the police ask for a key to check for drugs. This is equivalent a company selling video equipment, and the government asking for a live feed to every camera. Privacy for a drug dog to sniff at a box, is a lot less embarrassing, than the police walking in to your bath room to "search" you.
    No, this is exactly what you said it wasn't. This is a company offering a service and law enforcement asking for information pertaining to that service. The fact that it affected every single camera is Lavabit's fault.

    Thus, Lavabit, being communications, not storage, could not continue as a business offering secure communications and giving the keys to the NSA/Gov. As soon as they were asked for keys, their business model was extinct. They knew this, and prolonged the fall as long as they could. It might have been a stupid move, and they were annoying over it (printing keys on paper), but hey, go out with a bang. :)
    Then good to know nobody has used a telephone for decades because of wire taps.

    Or that nobody used Lavabit even after they gave out similar information in previous requests :p

    See if your business/place of work could continue if you had someone looking over your shoulder 24/7 to pull out customers. It would not take long before your customers realize they've got 24/7 surveillance on them, and they'd think twice about buying off your company.
    Again, Lavabit had already complied with previous court orders in the past...

    And there is no reason this should have affected all of their customers. Lavabit's system was fundamentally broken and insecure and THAT is why this is a problem, but they want to "go out with a bang" and rally the internet to them rather than wait a year or two to be "exposed", similar to what is happening with snapchat and what almost happened with dropbox a few years back (if dropbox got caught pulling that shit today, they would be gone. But nobody cared about security back then :p)

    Might have gone differently if they had asked for a number of keys, and not all keys?
    From your own link:
    And that came into play AFTER Lavabit started dicking around with the government ("going out with a bang" as you put it).

    Was the US government being petty? Of course. Lavabit had dicked around with them. But I also can't blame them for not trusting the company to give reliable data and evidence after they have already shown they have

    And here is another link on the subject. It is a pretty shitty looking site, but it seems VERY left leaning and it is consistent with other stories I have read, so I think it is valid for this bit. And either way, I can't be arsed to look at the second google result :p
    http://legalinsurrection.com/2013/10...-lavabit-case/

    In short, Lavabit first received a request from the government in June to provide data for one of its email users (whom many still presume to be Snowden based upon the timing and the charges listed in the unsealed documents). Because that user had enabled Lavabit’s premium secure service, Levison explained that he could not easily comply with the request because, based on Lavabit’s system, only the user is supposed to have access to the encryption key. So the government filed a motion that compelled Lavabit to comply with the request.
    Basically, Lavabit got a VERY standard request for information (the same kind normal cops make, just at a federal scale). Lavabit decided to protect said customer (unlike in the previous two dozen occurrences...). So they decided to "compromise"

    But Mr. Levison said he spent much of the following day thinking of a compromise. He would log the target’s communications, unscramble them with the encryption keys and upload them to a government server once a day. The F.B.I. told him that was not enough. It needed his target’s communications “in real time,” he said.
    We don't know the exact details of what the government wanted, but if they were trying to prevent the customer (probably Snowden :p) from leaking sensitive material or were trying to track him for whatever reason, that is completely reasonable from a legal standpoint (it is a wiretap). And even if it isn't, it is still Lavabit behaving differently from the previous times they complied

    When it was clear Mr. Levison had no choice but to comply, he devised a way to obey the order but make the government’s intrusion more arduous. On Aug 2, he infuriated agents by printing the encryption keys — long strings of seemingly random numbers — on paper in a font he believed would be hard to scan and turn into a usable digital format. Indeed, prosecutors described the file as “largely illegible.”
    And that is dicking around and intentionally obstructing justice (in the legal sense of the word).

    After all that, I sure as hell wouldn't trust the company to cooperate, would you?


    Again, the issue with this is that The Internet (reddit in particular...) caught wind of this and are portraying Lavabit as freedom fighters when they were actually immature assholes with a fundamentally shitty service who took a political position and got nailed for it. But because it is "fighting for our freedoms", people ignore that the service itself was designed horrifically and quite insecure. People ignore the fact that lavabit hasn't given a shit in the past. People ignore the fact that this is actually a pretty clear-cut case (Lavabit was issued a court order, they acted like assholes to obstruct justice).

    If Lavabit had really given a shit about "our rights", they would have fought this legally (actually, they would have fought this legally years ago when they first started complying with these orders...). They claim that they can't afford lawyers for this stuff: That is one of the things the ACLU is QUITE good for. Or they would have done what that other company did in between the court orders (so maybe a few months after the last time they complied with law enforcement to violate the privacy of their users...) and just wiped their databases and moved on. But they chose to instead act like children in the hopes that nobody would take a close look at just how shitty their service was.

    Because Lavabit is basically gone. But once all the legal fees are handled, the owners are going to be writing books (that everyone will buy and not read) and are probably going to have new start-up companies (that everyone will blindly buy into) because they are now Internet Folk Heroes. And it really does disgust me how people buy into this bullshit and praise them when we would lynch an "old white guy" who drives a company into the ground to pad his pockets.
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    So are you saying the NSA did not ask for a master/all keys? If it was insecure, a future update could change that. A current system error/bug/exploit is no reasons to close a business if the fix was "take out the central key". Why would they close over offering a "new upgraded" site?

    Your saying they would prefer to have the supposed fame from "closing down instead of giving in" over "giving 1 account out at court order and upgrading the site"? They preferred to close over making more money?

    Sorry, I don't follow your own posts as consistent. You mention it's the same, then post how it's different. Was the difference because this account was different, "premium"? If it uses a different system, perhaps it would expose the other communications. But as said, yes, it was a loophole that should not be there (Lavabit should not even have access to the coms in the first place). They could have released then done an "update" to remove the access to other customers. Perhaps they still will, under a different name?

    I never said they care about "our rights". (You really love to read into my posts on gaming and all sorts of opinion). I said they as a business, cannot operate to both give out all communications, and offer "secure" communications. If the NSA can request, they cannot run their business. They threw a tantrum and stormed out. That's nothing to do with freedom fighting. But I can understand most people would react similar if someone came in and shut down their business.

    Though I'd hope I'd be more civilized and plan slightly more sensibly and not offer such a dangerous service.

    PS, Telephones are not advertised as "secure communications", neither is email (and why the companies I worked for did not use it for confidential/secure communication).
    Last edited by TechnicalBen; 06-01-2014 at 02:17 PM.

  16. #16
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus gundato's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TechnicalBen View Post
    So are you saying the NSA did not ask for a master/all keys? If it was insecure, a future update could change that. A current system error/bug/exploit is no reasons to close a business if the fix was "take out the central key". Why would they close over offering a "new upgraded" site?
    The NSA asked for the key they needed to access the data. The fact that that was the master key is Lavabit's problem. It should NOT have been the Master Key and it should NOT have been a problem.

    That was why I mentioned the really shitty hotel example. Is it the cop's fault if the key they were given for room 204 unlocks every door in the building?

    Your saying they would prefer to have the supposed fame from "closing down instead of giving in" over "giving 1 account out at court order and upgrading the site"? They preferred to close over making more money?
    They saw that they would be exposed as not giving a shit about their customer's security and, as you yourself have said repeatedly, that was their selling point. By cutting and running, they can write books and probably make new companies that are likely just as shit for security.

    We will never know what really happened, but it looks like the guys in charge took a political stand, got nailed on that, and realized they were fucked no matter what at that point (because even if they completely redesigned the system for security, they lost trust). If they had just given in like they did the other two dozen times nothing would have happened.

    Sorry, I don't follow your own posts as consistent. You mention it's the same, then post how it's different. Was the difference because this account was different, "premium"? If it uses a different system, perhaps it would expose the other communications. But as said, yes, it was a loophole that should not be there (Lavabit should not even have access to the coms in the first place). They could have released then done an "update" to remove the access to other customers. Perhaps they still will, under a different name?
    I don't know what is different. My gut says that it was because they politically supported the mystery client (Snowden :p), and they got burned for it.

    And the difference, as I said above: Throwing a pedo under the bus is one thing. Nobody cares. Throwing a folk hero under the bus gets you exposed and burns bridges

    I never said they care about "our rights". (You really love to read into my posts on gaming and all sorts of opinion). I said they as a business, cannot operate to both give out all communications, and offer "secure" communications. If the NSA can request, they cannot run their business. They threw a tantrum and stormed out. That's nothing to do with freedom fighting. But I can understand most people would react similar if someone came in and shut down their business.
    Except they never had a problem giving away this information in the past. What makes the NSA special, ESPECIALLY when the NSA is actually doing it legally(-ish :p) for the first time ever?


    What is different in this situation? Lavabit decided to protect THIS customer for whatever reason (probably political), and they got burned for it.

    PS, Telephones are not advertised as "secure communications", neither is email (and why the companies I worked for did not use it for confidential/secure communication).
    But morons thought Lavabit and the like WERE secure, and that illusion was dispelled.

    It is just like the current debacle over the US spying on our allies. OF COURSE we spy on them. They spy on us. Everyone spies on everybody. That is how the world works. But the problem is that we got caught, so now everyone has to act indignant and offended.
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    Except they never had a problem giving away this information in the past. What makes the NSA special, ESPECIALLY when the NSA is actually doing it legally(-ish :p) for the first time ever?
    Because they never asked for the master key before. I would guess the exposure never evoked the "bug/exploit/mistake of centralized key" before. Or the previous examples as you said were all "illegal activity". Lavabit could always recover from those requests, as any community users are already aware there is no protection for illegal activity. Where as Lavabit saw no way to recover from this exposure. If we assume it was a whistle blower, while still illegal, it is harder to defend such action toward the community/userbase. It would remove their ability to continue being a business as no doubt it was a large proportion of their user base (China etc?).

    That's not freedom fighting. It's a conflict of interest on a business level. Plus a big error in business practice (centralized access to customer data when it's advertised as "secure"). But at the same time, it gives them little ability to do anything but close down. I'd still have thought they'd do a Mega and just re-open the site but with amended code/legal implementations. Strange they chose to completely scuttle it.

    It is just like the current debacle over the US spying on our allies. OF COURSE we spy on them. They spy on us. Everyone spies on everybody. That is how the world works. But the problem is that we got caught, so now everyone has to act indignant and offended.
    No, the problem is still spying. Such as, we can re-word the sentence "of cause we were stealing, everyone does it", and the problem is not less if everyone does it or if it's obvious. But note, I'm not acting indignant or offended, just pointing out, if someone steals from you, you would be upset. "We" care, the "governments" tend not to (it's their info and they share it/have unwritten agreements), but that's another conversation. Thus I can understand people being upset if their spied on (less so than stealing or whatever), or if a business is put into a legal headlock. :P

    As an example, people justify things for all the wrong or made up reasons. But that does not lessen any real wrong done to them. Just because they get emotional and pick the wrong "cause", should we view them as less effected? We can point out the real cause, but they still get effected by it none the less. Lavabit might have chosen wrongly to delay the inevitable. They might have blamed the wrong people. But they saw no way out of this last request, and realized their error in the service being offered (on the level of code or the level of legal restrictions).

    They supplied the roads only. To put any emotional or ideological reason beyond "building roads to make money" at this point would be projecting. Either of ones own ideas or of those they assume others to have.
    Last edited by TechnicalBen; 06-01-2014 at 04:02 PM.

  18. #18
    Jeez, a simple question is all I asked!

    But seriously, CDBurnerXP looks like a winner - if I do buy a recordable Bluray drive that is. The 1000 year lifespan of the Modisc that comes with the LG drive I've been looking at is a nice addition, though I'm pretty sure in 1000 years time I'll be dead so the point of that is what exactly?

    As for keeping backup files "off-site" I keep a 16gb USB drive on my car keys so it's with me every time I go out. In the event of some major disaster at home at least I have my most precious data on me...also encrypted.

  19. #19
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus gundato's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TechnicalBen View Post
    Because they never asked for the master key before. I would guess the exposure never evoked the "bug/exploit/mistake of centralized key" before. Or the previous examples as you said were all "illegal activity". Lavabit could always recover from those requests, as any community users are already aware there is no protection for illegal activity. Where as Lavabit saw no way to recover from this exposure. If we assume it was a whistle blower, while still illegal, it is harder to defend such action toward the community/userbase. It would remove their ability to continue being a business as no doubt it was a large proportion of their user base (China etc?).
    Because in the past they never had to ask for the key to the data they want. Again, the fact that it is the master key is the fault of Lavabit and Lavabit alone.

    And you DO realize this is also illegal, right? The law doesn't turn off if you approve of who is doing it.

    Stop fixating on "they want the master key", because it is really irrelevant. They wanted a key, the fact that it was the master one is Lavabit's shitty system.

    That's not freedom fighting. It's a conflict of interest on a business level. Plus a big error in business practice (centralized access to customer data when it's advertised as "secure"). But at the same time, it gives them little ability to do anything but close down. I'd still have thought they'd do a Mega and just re-open the site but with amended code/legal implementations. Strange they chose to completely scuttle it.
    I suspect it is mostly for legal purposes, since they are still in hot water over the obstruction charges if memory serves. Once that dies down and the "Email is inherently insecure, bwaghc!!!" shit goes away (again...) I see someone stepping in with a less stupid approach.


    No, the problem is still spying. Such as, we can re-word the sentence "of cause we were stealing, everyone does it", and the problem is not less if everyone does it or if it's obvious. But note, I'm not acting indignant or offended, just pointing out, if someone steals from you, you would be upset. "We" care, the "governments" tend not to (it's their info and they share it/have unwritten agreements), but that's another conversation. Thus I can understand people being upset if their spied on (less so than stealing or whatever), or if a business is put into a legal headlock. :P
    Oh, I would definitely be pissed if they got caught. But, for me at least, it is background noise. I know not to send detailed recipes for how to mix explosives over my gmail. I know people are watching and shit. But I can basically "ignore" that. Same thing with this. Even a bit of basic thought will reveal just how insecure the system was, but nobody wanted to look that closely at the time.
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  20. #20
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus
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    May 2012
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    1,513
    Yeah, I pretty much did lay the blame on Lavabit in my post. Still don't get where your beef is at anyone who actually posts here. Your treating us like we ran Lavabit or are promoting it.

    I was merely mentioning that worry over online backups is not unfounded. The examples out there, Lavabit and Megaupload, in addition to Adobe and PSN, mean that sites can loose data or get shut down. It's not overreacting, it's knowing that there is some risk, though small. It may be down to choice by the user, failing to "choose the right service", but knowing it's a risk means people take note and make better choices.

    Same thing with this. Even a bit of basic thought will reveal just how insecure the system was, but nobody wanted to look that closely at the time.
    Your saying Snowden both used it and knew it was unsecure? Or used it not knowing the risks? Or used it but fell for the fake promises? Or possibly did not care (it's all down to time as nothing is 100% secure)?

    The same applies to backups. Nothing is 100% secure, but we look to trade off time and reliability. I'd not bother with the expense of a system offering 1000 year reliability. 10 years guarantee or so will do (most HDDs) and another 50 a 5 years later for new media. Unless you want to go the tape route. :P

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