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  1. #1
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    Complete newb to PC building seeking advice.

    As stated in the title, I am completely new to PC building. So go specific and easy on me.

    I am trying to setup the best possible gaming PC with a budget of USD$1000-1300.

    I have no clue at all how to build a PC and my only PC-related experiences are plugging in USB devices and downloading device drivers.

    The things I already have:
    Mouse
    Keyboard

    Can anyone give me a list of what else I need? If possible, recommend me the names of the items, so I can go shopping easily.


    The games I am fairly interested in maxing out are Dota 2 and Counter-Strike: Global Offensive.

  2. #2
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    http://www.logicalincrements.com/

    You can get quite a lot for your budget. Once you have the parts it is not much harder than plugging in USB - you can ask here or youtube videos of any hard parts you run into.

  3. #3
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Sakkura's Avatar
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    Here's what I would suggest, with a couple hundred dollars left for a good monitor. Only a midrange graphics card since you don't seem to play very graphically demanding games.

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    CPU: Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($229.99 @ NCIX US)
    CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-U12P SE2 54.4 CFM CPU Cooler ($59.98 @ OutletPC)
    Motherboard: Asus Z87-PLUS ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($137.99 @ Newegg)
    Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($68.00 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Crucial M500 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($85.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($59.98 @ OutletPC)
    Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 660 2GB Video Card ($174.99 @ NCIX US)
    Case: Corsair 400R ATX Mid Tower Case ($65.99 @ NCIX US)
    Power Supply: Antec High Current Gamer 620W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($59.99 @ Newegg)
    Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($14.99 @ Newegg)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($88.98 @ OutletPC)
    Total: $1046.87
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-01-04 20:28 EST-0500)

  4. #4
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    Noctua cooler is a bit overboard unless he plans to overclock. Could save $30-$40.

    Go $30-$40 cheaper on the CPU with an i5-4570.

    Put it into the graphics or monitor. Or a 240GB SSD. 128GB does does not last long. Of course if you are only worried about 2-4 games and a few apps on the SSD, 120 is enough. You also see some read/write gains with the 240GB+.

  5. #5
    Network Hub FurryLippedSquid's Avatar
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    Could also halve the price of the motherboard, seems excessive for a budget build.

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16813157387
    Last edited by FurryLippedSquid; 05-01-2014 at 02:37 PM.

  6. #6
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    Ah yah, that also. More expensive MB gets you more SATA III ports, better RAID support, USB 3.0 ports, PCI slots, built in WiFi, RAM overclock and maybe a slight improvement in the bridge. Don't go cheap, but you could find what works for you around $100.

    Personally I like to stick to the sub $100s for my choices or higher. And Asus which tend to be a little more.

  7. #7
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    Thank you guys for the advice.

    Can I ask, if the systems/hardware recommended for me are actually upgradable?

    Also, Sakkura, can that system definitely max out on Dota 2 and CS:GO?

    Lastly, what should I prioritize getting first?
    What are the most important components of my PC that require the least amount of change?
    What are the components that fail easily or require changes every 1-2 years?
    If I have extra money, where should I spend them on to get the most value?

    I'm looking at building a PC meant to last me at least 5 years, of course with upgrades, but at a reasonable price. My intent is to be able to play those 2 core games of mine while still be able to enjoy whatever new games coming out in the next 2-3 years, not necessarily at maximum settings, but at least decently.

  8. #8
    Network Hub FurryLippedSquid's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fenghuang View Post
    Thank you guys for the advice.

    Can I ask, if the systems/hardware recommended for me are actually upgradable?

    YES.

    Also, Sakkura, can that system definitely max out on Dota 2 and CS:GO?

    YES. EASILY.

    Lastly, what should I prioritize getting first?

    ERM, ALL OF IT REALLY, WON'T WORK TOO WELL WITHOUT ANY OF IT EXCEPT THE SSD, BUT AS WINDOWS SHOULD BE ON IT, YOU'RE LOOKING AT A REFORMAT FURTHER DOWN THE LINE.

    What are the most important components of my PC that require the least amount of change?

    THAT CPU SHOULD LAST YOU 5 YEARS AT LEAST. AS WILL THE CASE, MOTHERBOARD, RAM, ALL 3 DRIVES (TOUCH WOOD), AND PSU.

    What are the components that fail easily or require changes every 1-2 years?

    ANYTHING CAN FAIL. YOUR VIDEO CARD WILL BE THE FIRST THING TO UPGRADE. EVERYTHING ELSE SHOULD LAST FOR YEARS. I'VE BEEN RUNNING THE SAME SYSTEM FOR FIVE YEARS (Q8200 and GTX 260) AND ONLY NOW IS IT STARTING TO CREAK. SPENT £100 ON A NEW VIDEO CARD (7850) OVER CHRISTMAS AND NOW I'M HAPPY AGAIN. FOR A WHILE. SHOULD HAVE SPENT A BIT MORE IN TRUTH!

    If I have extra money, where should I spend them on to get the most value?

    VIDEO CARD. BUT DON'T FORGET TO FACTOR A MONITOR IN TO YOUR BUDGET.

    I'm looking at building a PC meant to last me at least 5 years, of course with upgrades, but at a reasonable price. My intent is to be able to play those 2 core games of mine while still be able to enjoy whatever new games coming out in the next 2-3 years, not necessarily at maximum settings, but at least decently.

    THIS WILL SERVE YOU WELL. THOUGH YOU MAY NEED TO UPGRADE THE VIDEO CARD IN A YEAR OR TWO. DEPENDS ON THE GAMES REALLY, IF YOU'RE LOOKING TO MAX OUT WITCHER 3 LATER IN THE YEAR, YOU'LL NEED A BETTER VIDEO CARD. BUT REALLY THAT'S THE ONLY GAME LOOKING SET TO TEST YOUR SYSTEM AT THE MOMENT.
    I've put my answers in the quote as it was easier.
    Last edited by FurryLippedSquid; 05-01-2014 at 07:12 PM.

  9. #9
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Sakkura's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moraven View Post
    Noctua cooler is a bit overboard unless he plans to overclock. Could save $30-$40.

    Go $30-$40 cheaper on the CPU with an i5-4570.

    Put it into the graphics or monitor. Or a 240GB SSD. 128GB does does not last long. Of course if you are only worried about 2-4 games and a few apps on the SSD, 120 is enough. You also see some read/write gains with the 240GB+.
    Quote Originally Posted by FurryLippedSquid View Post
    Could also halve the price of the motherboard, seems excessive for a budget build.

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16813157387
    Over $1000 is not a budget build. And I set it up for overclocking. Of course you can ditch that and save some money, but it's not a better build that way.

  10. #10
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Sakkura's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FurryLippedSquid View Post
    I've put my answers in the quote as it was easier.
    I agree with those answers.

    All these builds are somewhat CPU-heavy and GPU-light. I went that way because those types of games really don't put a lot of load on the GPU. But if you switch to more graphically demanding games later on, it's easy to upgrade the GPU and the rest of the build would still easily keep up.

  11. #11
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Kelron's Avatar
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    Do you want the best PC you can get for the budget you specified, or the cheapest PC that can handle the games you want to play? CS and Dota are not very demanding.

  12. #12
    Network Hub FurryLippedSquid's Avatar
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    The above is a valid point. You could build a system to max out those games for around half the price of the mean of your quoted budget. However, if this is important to you...

    Quote Originally Posted by fenghuang View Post
    while still be able to enjoy whatever new games coming out in the next 2-3 years, not necessarily at maximum settings, but at least decently.
    ...you should be building the system recommended.

    Quote Originally Posted by Sakkura View Post
    Over $1000 is not a budget build. And I set it up for overclocking.
    Very true, I'm not sure the OP knows what budget to use! (no offence). And doesn't seem the type to get all overclocky.
    Last edited by FurryLippedSquid; 05-01-2014 at 08:03 PM.

  13. #13
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    There are auto overclocking tools but generally for a first time builder, overclocking is usually not recommended.

    But yah, if you want it to last longer into the light, you might as well keep the higher CPU. Upgrade the video card in 2 years.

    Still think the Noctua is overkill, especially for a first time builder. Its a pain to get in and you need to make sure to have low profile heatsinks on the RAM. $25 Arctic Cooler or similar would be easier to put it and just do nearly the same cooling.

  14. #14
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    That Noctua is superb (I'm yet to see temps above 55 celsius), but the biggest PITA to install I've ever come across.

    Sakkura's recommendations are good. Double check that the RAM will fit in there with that monster of a fan and consider upping the GPU a notch or two if you want to play upcoming AA titles with all the bells and whistles.

  15. #15
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Sakkura's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moraven View Post
    There are auto overclocking tools but generally for a first time builder, overclocking is usually not recommended.

    But yah, if you want it to last longer into the light, you might as well keep the higher CPU. Upgrade the video card in 2 years.

    Still think the Noctua is overkill, especially for a first time builder. Its a pain to get in and you need to make sure to have low profile heatsinks on the RAM. $25 Arctic Cooler or similar would be easier to put it and just do nearly the same cooling.
    When you're building your own computer, that's generally where the interest in overclocking starts to creep in. As for "recommended", technically overclocking is never officially recommended. But with a solid build it's fine.

    As for low profile heatsinks on the RAM... the G.Skill kit has low-ish heatsinks. And the motherboard is on Noctua's list of motherboards supported with high DIMMs.

  16. #16
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    Need help here too!!!!

    Is this pc good for gaming totes newwb here :P

    Processor
    Intel® Core™ i5-4430 Processor (6M Cache, up to 3.20 GHz)
    Operating System
    Microsoft Windows 7 64bit Trial
    MS-Office 2010 (free Trial)
    MacAfee Antivirus (free Trial)
    Chipset
    Intel® B85 Chipset
    Form factor Micro ATX
    Audio Eight (6+2) channel Intel® HD Audio
    Lan Support Gigabit Ethernet controller
    Peripheral interfaces
    Eight USB 2.0 ports (4 external ports, 4 via internal headers)
    Four USB 3.0 ports (2 external ports, 2 via internal headers)
    Four Serial ATA 6.0 Gb/s port
    Two SATA 3.0 Gb/s ports
    Graphics
    Memory Amount 4096MB DDR3
    Memory Interface (bit) (MHz)
    CUDA cores 128bit
    Engine CLK (MHz) 810Mhz
    Memory CLK (Gbps) 1 Gbps
    Memory
    Support for DDR3 1600 /1333 MHz DIMMs
    one 4GB memory module 1333MHz
    Maximize your system memory capacity for ultimate performance
    XMS heat spreader
    Storage
    500GB SATA 6Gb/s NCQ 16mb Cache Barracuda
    Chassis
    Airflow optimized - mesh on front panel, air vents on top, side panel, and bottom
    Supports up to 7 fans, including one pre-installed 120mm rear fan
    Tool-free mechanical design for quick assembly
    Dust filters at top and bottom for easy maintenance
    6 HDD bays and 7 expansion slots provides a plenty of expansion
    Power Supply
    Output Capacity 420 Watts
    Hold Up Time >17ms
    Efficiency >70%
    Fan 120MM

  17. #17
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Sakkura's Avatar
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    Well there's very little information about what actual hardware is in the system. Only the CPU and hard drive seem to be explicitly stated.
    It apparently only has a single 4 GB DIMM at 1333 MT/s, so that kinda sucks. And the graphics card has 4 GB DDR3 memory, which is just idiotic.

    You only get a trial version of Windows, so you'd have to pay for a full version later. They don't specify the power supply, so there's a real risk it's a terrible no-name unit.

  18. #18
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    Sounds like a scam to me. Well, not totally a scam, you get exactly what is on paper and you pay for it. It's not "a good deal" though, at any price.

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